Anil wants Flickr to pay

Interesting little debate going on the blogs this morning. Anil Dash wants Flickr to pay its users, particularly the ones who put the most popular content onto the service. Caterina, co-founder of Flickr, answers back, says more to life than money.

That sounds cool, but there certainly is a belief among mainstream big company publishers I’m listening to that “user generated content” (I HATE that term) is how they are going to build profitable businesses. Basically, they are looking at bloggers and photographers and others as cheap labor. Get the stuff for free, stick ads next to it, and make a ton of money. That basically explains a large percentage of the Silicon Valley startup’s business plans lately too.

I feel the same about these folks as I felt about the folks who talked about “making sites sticky” in the late 1990s. They created business opportunity by being selfish and greedy. Which is sorta funny, when you think about it, isn’t it?

The real way to create a sticky site turned out to be to send people away from your site more often than anyone else.

It’ll be interesting to see if the best way to build a really great Internet business and a great Web-based community just might be to pay people to write, take photos, record podcasts, and give their knowledge into the system. Hmmm, what are the two of the hottest companies? eBay and Google. They pay their users, particularly ones who are popular (I have friends making $10,000+ a month off of Google ads, for instance).

64 thoughts on “Anil wants Flickr to pay

  1. Pingback: Preoccupations
  2. Suggest flickr that booger and go to Spy Media http://www.spymedia.com which previewed Nov 2005 and solves the problem flickr created. It’s based on an eBay like commerce system. It also requires every photo to be profiled before selling and news relevant before posting which eliminates being a dumping ground for family photos.

  3. Suggest flickr that booger and go to Spy Media http://www.spymedia.com which previewed Nov 2005 and solves the problem flickr created. It’s based on an eBay like commerce system. It also requires every photo to be profiled before selling and news relevant before posting which eliminates being a dumping ground for family photos.

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  5. To pay or – not? Ultimate decision, obviously, is upon Flickr itself. But IMHO, it would be great to Flickr itself, to honor part of its toplist photographers.
    Flickr anyway doesn’t want to pay nothing? Guys, I beleive, there IS room for another Flickr (whatever it will be named)! Let’s build another photosharing service. Anybody?

  6. To pay or – not? Ultimate decision, obviously, is upon Flickr itself. But IMHO, it would be great to Flickr itself, to honor part of its toplist photographers.
    Flickr anyway doesn’t want to pay nothing? Guys, I beleive, there IS room for another Flickr (whatever it will be named)! Let’s build another photosharing service. Anybody?

  7. Come on robert .. all the post is plain nonsense and the final is incredible:

    “Or does it mean I should just make an automated script that grabs my interesting photos and posts them to my TypePad blog so that I can put ads on them?”

  8. Come on robert .. all the post is plain nonsense and the final is incredible:

    “Or does it mean I should just make an automated script that grabs my interesting photos and posts them to my TypePad blog so that I can put ads on them?”

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