Beattie not finding startups with any depth

Russell Beattie, who works at Yahoo, has a great post today where he takes on a lot of the hype around new companies that are springing up like mushrooms around the world. I visited a few of these startups this week and I too didn’t find the next Microsoft or Google. But, if I took you back in time to 1998, would you have believed me if I said that Google would be a business with a $100 billion market cap within seven years? I don’t think so.

I look for small things that I’d like to use. And, there are definitely some things coming that fit that bill. I do judge everything by Jeff Sandquist’s seven day rule. What new apps are surviving your seven-day test?

Comments

  1. “I too didn’t find the next Microsoft”

    Isn’t this a great thing, since that’d mean we won’t have to deal with a convicted monopoly abuser for over a decade?

  2. “I too didn’t find the next Microsoft”

    Isn’t this a great thing, since that’d mean we won’t have to deal with a convicted monopoly abuser for over a decade?

  3. >If I took you back in time to 1998, would you have
    >believed me if I said that Google would be a business
    >with a $100 billion market cap within seven years?

    No. But here’s the thing – I remember realising, the very first time I tried Google, that Alta Vista was finished. And when the text-only ads popped up, I remember realising that I found them useful, not annoying (compared to the banner ads that were ubiquitous at the time). Years later, when I set-up Google adwords campaigns, there was another “wow factor” – they made unbelievably easy to use; and it started connected customers to the business in a few minutes.

    In other words – I think there were more than a few clues that Google was going to change the world. For a number of current, high-profile start-ups, on the other hand, the most exciting thing people can find to say about them is that they use AJAX.

    Now, it may be that some of these guys do actually have businesses that are going to change the world. And it’s just that they haven’t found a good way to communicate what they’re doing. But for the moment, I have to say I can see where Russell Beattie is coming from. (more at http://www.psynixis.com/blog/?p=14 )

  4. >If I took you back in time to 1998, would you have
    >believed me if I said that Google would be a business
    >with a $100 billion market cap within seven years?

    No. But here’s the thing – I remember realising, the very first time I tried Google, that Alta Vista was finished. And when the text-only ads popped up, I remember realising that I found them useful, not annoying (compared to the banner ads that were ubiquitous at the time). Years later, when I set-up Google adwords campaigns, there was another “wow factor” – they made unbelievably easy to use; and it started connected customers to the business in a few minutes.

    In other words – I think there were more than a few clues that Google was going to change the world. For a number of current, high-profile start-ups, on the other hand, the most exciting thing people can find to say about them is that they use AJAX.

    Now, it may be that some of these guys do actually have businesses that are going to change the world. And it’s just that they haven’t found a good way to communicate what they’re doing. But for the moment, I have to say I can see where Russell Beattie is coming from. (more at http://www.psynixis.com/blog/?p=14 )

  5. I’ve got an app that’ll be worth $10 billion once it goes public.

    The last statement may or may not be a lie.

    Ok, it’s a lie, but it’d be nice! I have a network of sites worth several thousand. That’s close to a billion, right?

  6. I’ve got an app that’ll be worth $10 billion once it goes public.

    The last statement may or may not be a lie.

    Ok, it’s a lie, but it’d be nice! I have a network of sites worth several thousand. That’s close to a billion, right?

  7. Here’s a clue. If you see someone write about a new startup and they spend more tme describing the technology the startup is using rather than the product, avoid the startup (and product)l

  8. Here’s a clue. If you see someone write about a new startup and they spend more tme describing the technology the startup is using rather than the product, avoid the startup (and product)l

  9. Excellent post!
    I was going to blog about Russ’s comments tonight, but you have just written what I was thinking. It’s easy to make the mistake of thinking that the waters have stagnated but the truth is that the granularity of the solutions have changed.
    Russ will come around to some of these startup companies in his own time, just like we all will.

    Glad to see you have kept the layout and style of your previous blog website.

  10. Excellent post!
    I was going to blog about Russ’s comments tonight, but you have just written what I was thinking. It’s easy to make the mistake of thinking that the waters have stagnated but the truth is that the granularity of the solutions have changed.
    Russ will come around to some of these startup companies in his own time, just like we all will.

    Glad to see you have kept the layout and style of your previous blog website.

  11. I thought that Ebay had no chance when they first went public. Just because an individual wouldn’t use a product/service doesn’t mean there aren’t scores of others who would pay good money for it.

  12. I thought that Ebay had no chance when they first went public. Just because an individual wouldn’t use a product/service doesn’t mean there aren’t scores of others who would pay good money for it.

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