WordPress.com was down for about half an hour

Whew, my blog was down for about half an hour. Very frustrating. Demonstrates one of the weaknesses on being on a beta service (WordPress.com is still in development). Yesterday we were over at F5 meeting with the guys who make their hardware and services. They demonstrated to us how to build a service that’ll stay up no matter what happens to your servers.

Service uptimes are very important, and even more important when you are betting your business on them.

When you are looking at a blog tool for your business, you better make sure it has failover to another data center in a different city. Does anyone offer that kind of blog service for a reasonable price?

66 thoughts on “WordPress.com was down for about half an hour

  1. Is blog software and serives reached the “industrial strenght” threshold ? Where DR and reduncy is coupled with HAS ??

    I don’t think so. Most companies don’t even have a blog let alone servers and hosting serives for them.

    We the comunity is crying “wolf” just because it is something (blog hosting) we are paying for and want service and uptime. When it blogs become mission critcal then one will find apps and servers being jelled together to obtain “best of class” attriubtion. Till then sitback and expect that we will have “noise” failure for interim moments of time!!

  2. Is blog software and serives reached the “industrial strenght” threshold ? Where DR and reduncy is coupled with HAS ??

    I don’t think so. Most companies don’t even have a blog let alone servers and hosting serives for them.

    We the comunity is crying “wolf” just because it is something (blog hosting) we are paying for and want service and uptime. When it blogs become mission critcal then one will find apps and servers being jelled together to obtain “best of class” attriubtion. Till then sitback and expect that we will have “noise” failure for interim moments of time!!

  3. The blogs hosted at http://www.msmvps.com are down atleast once a day, for atleast 15-20 minutes. It all started around the day at PDC when the electricity went out (I believe the servers that host us are located in LA).

    I feel bad for Susan Bradley (http://msmvps.com/bradley/) she is really trying to get us to a better server, and this keeps happening. She is doing this, from what I believe, all on her own dime. I thank her for everything, and feel bad when people complain about the server down time.

  4. The blogs hosted at http://www.msmvps.com are down atleast once a day, for atleast 15-20 minutes. It all started around the day at PDC when the electricity went out (I believe the servers that host us are located in LA).

    I feel bad for Susan Bradley (http://msmvps.com/bradley/) she is really trying to get us to a better server, and this keeps happening. She is doing this, from what I believe, all on her own dime. I thank her for everything, and feel bad when people complain about the server down time.

  5. My understanding is that WP.com is not intended to be a business solution, so it doesn’t really bother me that it should be down for half an hour when people want to use it.

    Annoying? Yes. Terrible? No. No one’s business depends on WP.com being up 99.9% of the time. Nor does a business depend on having their blog up all of the time.

    Also, I assume/hope this maintenance was scheduled, so users knew to expect a 30-min outage. When I used other hosting services, I appreciated their notifications scheduled downtime. If your service isn’t free, I’d expect scheduled maintenance to be done late Saturday night or early Sunday morning, when it would have the least impact on traffic.

    On another note, I think demanding redundant, fault-tolerant, 100%-uptime, RAIDed, load-balanced servers for one’s weblog is akin to demanding that your coffee be served in a double-walled platinum carafe: It might be nice, but it’s really not worth the price. We’re talking blogs here, not e-commerce.

    Each user needs to determine how much uptime is really worth for them. With the vast majority of hosts, the vast majority of bloggers will never experience unscheduled downtime. The difference in downtime between a $5 a month normal host and a $99 a month uber-redundant host will be imperceptible.

  6. My understanding is that WP.com is not intended to be a business solution, so it doesn’t really bother me that it should be down for half an hour when people want to use it.

    Annoying? Yes. Terrible? No. No one’s business depends on WP.com being up 99.9% of the time. Nor does a business depend on having their blog up all of the time.

    Also, I assume/hope this maintenance was scheduled, so users knew to expect a 30-min outage. When I used other hosting services, I appreciated their notifications scheduled downtime. If your service isn’t free, I’d expect scheduled maintenance to be done late Saturday night or early Sunday morning, when it would have the least impact on traffic.

    On another note, I think demanding redundant, fault-tolerant, 100%-uptime, RAIDed, load-balanced servers for one’s weblog is akin to demanding that your coffee be served in a double-walled platinum carafe: It might be nice, but it’s really not worth the price. We’re talking blogs here, not e-commerce.

    Each user needs to determine how much uptime is really worth for them. With the vast majority of hosts, the vast majority of bloggers will never experience unscheduled downtime. The difference in downtime between a $5 a month normal host and a $99 a month uber-redundant host will be imperceptible.

  7. Robert, for God’s sake, go and buy yourself a hosting and forget about hosted blogging services. Take a look at GoDaddy: helluva traffic for only $3.95/mo. Mine blog is hosted there. WordPress setup takes only couple minutes. Why bother with something else?

  8. Robert, for God’s sake, go and buy yourself a hosting and forget about hosted blogging services. Take a look at GoDaddy: helluva traffic for only $3.95/mo. Mine blog is hosted there. WordPress setup takes only couple minutes. Why bother with something else?

  9. Jeff, agreed, once you have the infrastructure to actually support “more than enough 9s” of uptime, building an app framework that makes maintenance upgrades and the like seamless is a fantastic idea :)

  10. Jeff, agreed, once you have the infrastructure to actually support “more than enough 9s” of uptime, building an app framework that makes maintenance upgrades and the like seamless is a fantastic idea :)

  11. Robert, thanks again for stopping by yesterday. We really enjoyed your visit and great discussion.

    This is a fascinating dialogue. It also highlights how the role of a network is changing quickly. The notion of how many “9′s” a company needs is an interesting – and critical – discussion. Need varies based upon the business requirements and budget tolerance.

    But, here’s a different angle on the cost factor. What if you could build an application that ensures total uptime during datacenter/app updates while automating the process through app and network integration? The cost savings in CLI/management effort is significant with total error reduction (i.e. downtime).

    Or, if the device is smart enough to read and understand the datastream and sanitize it to ensure that sensitive information never leaves the datacenter, what’s that worth? (think credit card numbers? SS#s?) It’s kind of like those Mastercard ads… Cost of servers? $$$… Cost of network hardware? $$$… Avoiding the costs of telling your 30,000 customers that you *may* have leaked their credit card numbers? Priceless. ;-)

    We’ve got an iRule on DevCentral that does this. (http://devcentral.f5.com).

    We’re getting to the point where the value of applications running on smart network devices can more than cover the cost of the network gear (and servers, for that matter).

    Uptime and fault tolerance are the foundation to deploying any web app or service. Using more advanced features (APIs, rules, etc.) offer a completely different way of looking at cost/value/business criticality.

    - Jeff

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