#71: RSS Bandit author considers OPML reading lists

Dare Obasanjo is one of the authors of RSS Bandit (a really nice free Windows-based RSS Aggregator) and he’s considering OPML reading lists and wants your feedback.

Why does this matter? Well, it’d let you create your own Memeorandum style newspage for instance.

Dare, what I’d like to do is import my 1,400 feeds and then assign a weight to each of them. Some of those bloggers, for instance, write about politics. Some tech. Some family life. So, what I want is to tag them and then give them a weight in each category. Dave Winer, for instance, outweighs Rick Segal in tech, but Rick outweighs Dave in VC.

If I delete a reading list I don’t want to delete the subscriptions. I think we need two different interfaces for those things.

What do you think?

Comments

  1. What I really want is a memeorandum engine for my feeds. the most linked articles being shown to me first. tagging is big, really big, tag based navigation isn’t going anywhere and that is annoying me. not one developer is listening to me on my ideas for an rss reader, it really makes me sad because every new rss reader that comes out is just a clone of the other one.

    i tried contacting dare personally but never get replies :(

    What I want to see happen to OPML is tagging be implemented right in the spec, so we can have a dynamic outline.

    Think ipod interface, you can have an outline of genres, an outline oy years, an outline of artists or album names. I love opml i really do, but it is so static, and it’s annoying me. we need to look at the successful ipod user interface, see how they apply tagging and make something similar for an rss reader.

    if any developer, especially you dare, or nick bradbury want to listen to anything i have to say just drop me a line please. devilsrejection at gmail.com

  2. What I really want is a memeorandum engine for my feeds. the most linked articles being shown to me first. tagging is big, really big, tag based navigation isn’t going anywhere and that is annoying me. not one developer is listening to me on my ideas for an rss reader, it really makes me sad because every new rss reader that comes out is just a clone of the other one.

    i tried contacting dare personally but never get replies :(

    What I want to see happen to OPML is tagging be implemented right in the spec, so we can have a dynamic outline.

    Think ipod interface, you can have an outline of genres, an outline oy years, an outline of artists or album names. I love opml i really do, but it is so static, and it’s annoying me. we need to look at the successful ipod user interface, see how they apply tagging and make something similar for an rss reader.

    if any developer, especially you dare, or nick bradbury want to listen to anything i have to say just drop me a line please. devilsrejection at gmail.com

  3. Bing bing bing.

    The abilty of the user to define how the feed author is an authority is something I brought up at MindCamp, but no one seemed too interested except Alex Barnett. Everyone there seemed more interested in search engines defining the context and the tags. Like everyone would just agree on what the tags mean and how people fit into them. That’s wrong thinking.

    http://www.lazycoder.com/weblog/index.php/archives/2005/11/05/tagging-rss-opml-session/

  4. Bing bing bing.

    The abilty of the user to define how the feed author is an authority is something I brought up at MindCamp, but no one seemed too interested except Alex Barnett. Everyone there seemed more interested in search engines defining the context and the tags. Like everyone would just agree on what the tags mean and how people fit into them. That’s wrong thinking.

    http://www.lazycoder.com/weblog/index.php/archives/2005/11/05/tagging-rss-opml-session/

  5. Stefan, in one way I agree with you, but there are degrees of importance. I subscribe to 400+ feeds, but if I’ve only got 5 mins to see what’s up (but don’t have time to scann them all), then we have a problem, the ‘attention’ problem.

    Now, Yahoo’s reseach showed that users of RSS (including those who don’t know they are using RSS) have 4.5 subscriptions, so for the avergae user, maybe this isn’t so much of a problem? That said, I think this average will increase, a lot.

  6. Stefan, in one way I agree with you, but there are degrees of importance. I subscribe to 400+ feeds, but if I’ve only got 5 mins to see what’s up (but don’t have time to scann them all), then we have a problem, the ‘attention’ problem.

    Now, Yahoo’s reseach showed that users of RSS (including those who don’t know they are using RSS) have 4.5 subscriptions, so for the avergae user, maybe this isn’t so much of a problem? That said, I think this average will increase, a lot.

  7. theres also another thing, that i’ve miss at reading rss.
    i want to give + and – to posts, and the programm shows me the overall rating of a feed. because it would be nice, to have the top wanted feeds on my pocketPC and also i want to remove the badest ones. but with more than 100 feeds, there would be hard work to filter the bad ones out(them, who maybe just had one good post and jumped on my list or so)

  8. theres also another thing, that i’ve miss at reading rss.
    i want to give + and – to posts, and the programm shows me the overall rating of a feed. because it would be nice, to have the top wanted feeds on my pocketPC and also i want to remove the badest ones. but with more than 100 feeds, there would be hard work to filter the bad ones out(them, who maybe just had one good post and jumped on my list or so)

  9. [...] I suppose on the positive side all these formats are only a (Tidy+) XSLT away from RDF/XML anyhow, and as Dan Connolly recently pointed out, that’s not such a big hammer these days. Seems to me the pragmatic approach will be to rack up the micromodels. Another positive point is that with things like attention and reading lists are putting the need for smarter aggregators on the A-lister agenda. Smarter aggregators are helped by smarter data, and smarter data is good for the Web. Danny@12:55 | Semantic Web & Blogging & Programming & Microformats [...]

  10. Well, when the average user only has a handful of feeds, then he can go web based and have a nice little page display.

    But for serious users of RSS (and I mean this in the sense of *needing* to work with this stuff) I find many developers trying to reinvent the extra wheel – instead of concentrating on things which would be important to a user.

    I am not saying that there is the one right solution of how one has to use RSS, it would be nuts to say so. Everybody has a different style of working.

    But there are some things which are consistent:
    We want to read information which are important to us. We need to read certain information regardless if scored down otherwise- We do want to read our feeds but would like to explore more (“other people writing about this, ordered by if they are subscribed to by your friends”)

    On some topics we want to see updates from other sites (“if x new reactions have arrived, pop this up again”). Some information we only want to read for a special amount of time (“gadabe this stuff for the next 30 days, then disappear”) We have rules based upon we would like to unsubscribe (“show me that this feed is on probation, if I do not click the interesting button at least on X percent of the posts, put it into the unsubscribed folder”)

    Also my friends could say this post is important so it pops up on my radar – and they do not need to post about it every time they see something slightly interesting.

    *sigh* but of course, everything would be a goldmine for data mining – concepts of trust and of what share with whom (you can see my feeds but not my recommendations) need to come with this also.

    I doubt that people with many feeds to read have so different needs from the people with some feeds – the latter just gives up earlier. If we improve ways to handle the feeds for power users, I am sure, there will be benefits for the others as well.

    I would hate to see the typical user of IE7 with RSS built in to give up after a handful feeds because they are not managed well enough.

  11. Well, when the average user only has a handful of feeds, then he can go web based and have a nice little page display.

    But for serious users of RSS (and I mean this in the sense of *needing* to work with this stuff) I find many developers trying to reinvent the extra wheel – instead of concentrating on things which would be important to a user.

    I am not saying that there is the one right solution of how one has to use RSS, it would be nuts to say so. Everybody has a different style of working.

    But there are some things which are consistent:
    We want to read information which are important to us. We need to read certain information regardless if scored down otherwise- We do want to read our feeds but would like to explore more (“other people writing about this, ordered by if they are subscribed to by your friends”)

    On some topics we want to see updates from other sites (“if x new reactions have arrived, pop this up again”). Some information we only want to read for a special amount of time (“gadabe this stuff for the next 30 days, then disappear”) We have rules based upon we would like to unsubscribe (“show me that this feed is on probation, if I do not click the interesting button at least on X percent of the posts, put it into the unsubscribed folder”)

    Also my friends could say this post is important so it pops up on my radar – and they do not need to post about it every time they see something slightly interesting.

    *sigh* but of course, everything would be a goldmine for data mining – concepts of trust and of what share with whom (you can see my feeds but not my recommendations) need to come with this also.

    I doubt that people with many feeds to read have so different needs from the people with some feeds – the latter just gives up earlier. If we improve ways to handle the feeds for power users, I am sure, there will be benefits for the others as well.

    I would hate to see the typical user of IE7 with RSS built in to give up after a handful feeds because they are not managed well enough.