Can I shoot someone?

I just asked someone why they only provide partial-text feeds. Here’s the answer I got back:

Currently our sites only provide excerpt feeds because we feel it is really important to get customers to our sites. We will be looking into full text feeds to see if this is something that is feasible for our sites. Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

OK, let me get this straight? You’re asking me to send people to your Web site, but you treat me like a slave? Got it. Unsubscribed! No link for you. You just lost my 18 readers. Er, NewsGator says I have 18,000 subscribers. None of them for you. I’m not going to be your slave today. No sirreeeeeeeee.

Comments

  1. I’m reminded of the book Catcher in the Rye. Forgive me if I paraphrase incorrectly but in the book Holden speaks of a speech class where if the speaker went off topic the class yelled “Digression!”

    Perhaps there should be a similar rule here. However, instead of Robert going off topic, it’s when his posts seem…well…a bit high and mighty. When this happens and he wields the power of his readers around, we simply yell “Ego!”

    Just a thought. ;)

  2. I’m reminded of the book Catcher in the Rye. Forgive me if I paraphrase incorrectly but in the book Holden speaks of a speech class where if the speaker went off topic the class yelled “Digression!”

    Perhaps there should be a similar rule here. However, instead of Robert going off topic, it’s when his posts seem…well…a bit high and mighty. When this happens and he wields the power of his readers around, we simply yell “Ego!”

    Just a thought. ;)

  3. I’m reminded of the book Catcher in the Rye. Forgive me if I paraphrase incorrectly but in the book Holden speaks of a speech class where if the speaker went off topic the class yelled “Digression!”

    Perhaps there should be a similar rule here. However, instead of Robert going off topic, it’s when his posts seem…well…a bit high and mighty. When this happens and he wields the power of his readers around, we simply yell “Ego!”

    Just a thought. ;)

  4. Steve: I have an ego. I’m not going to treat my readers like idiots or slaves. I won’t send them to people who treat people this way. Maybe the folks who treat people like info slaves are the real egotists.

  5. Steve: I have an ego. I’m not going to treat my readers like idiots or slaves. I won’t send them to people who treat people this way. Maybe the folks who treat people like info slaves are the real egotists.

  6. Steve: I have an ego. I’m not going to treat my readers like idiots or slaves. I won’t send them to people who treat people this way. Maybe the folks who treat people like info slaves are the real egotists.

  7. The is exactly what I have been telling bloggers for what seems like eternity now. They are old-school. They think the only way they can up their business is to have users go to their site to collect on advertising. If you offer everything through RSS you still get the hits, you still retain the business, and you strengthen the bond between business and customer.

    The is a classic example of a site “not getting-it.” They are only causing themselve more problems by alienating users and, at the same time, doubling their traffic costs by making customers download their pages twice. Once through RSS and another through their web page.

  8. The is exactly what I have been telling bloggers for what seems like eternity now. They are old-school. They think the only way they can up their business is to have users go to their site to collect on advertising. If you offer everything through RSS you still get the hits, you still retain the business, and you strengthen the bond between business and customer.

    The is a classic example of a site “not getting-it.” They are only causing themselve more problems by alienating users and, at the same time, doubling their traffic costs by making customers download their pages twice. Once through RSS and another through their web page.

  9. The is exactly what I have been telling bloggers for what seems like eternity now. They are old-school. They think the only way they can up their business is to have users go to their site to collect on advertising. If you offer everything through RSS you still get the hits, you still retain the business, and you strengthen the bond between business and customer.

    The is a classic example of a site “not getting-it.” They are only causing themselve more problems by alienating users and, at the same time, doubling their traffic costs by making customers download their pages twice. Once through RSS and another through their web page.

  10. Robert: You really need to relax, people do have different opinions about different issues… just because they don’t agree with you is not an excuse to act childish.

  11. Robert: You really need to relax, people do have different opinions about different issues… just because they don’t agree with you is not an excuse to act childish.

  12. Robert: You really need to relax, people do have different opinions about different issues… just because they don’t agree with you is not an excuse to act childish.

  13. Too much caffeine since being back? ;-^)

    Though I do get ticked at such “canned” responses myself. I wouldn’t have linked to them for that reason alone.

  14. Too much caffeine since being back? ;-^)

    Though I do get ticked at such “canned” responses myself. I wouldn’t have linked to them for that reason alone.

  15. Too much caffeine since being back? ;-^)

    Though I do get ticked at such “canned” responses myself. I wouldn’t have linked to them for that reason alone.

  16. Brad: that’s how many content sites view you. As a slave that should dutifully visit without ever questioning. Oh, and you should also add some “user generated content” while you’re there, so they can put an ad next to it and make lots of money off of your efforts.

    Ahmad: this is far beyond agreeing or not agreeing. They want my readers to visit and be dutiful little readers. And if having a snit is childish, then you might want to visit some other, more corporate blog. I think you got me confused with some press release or something.

  17. Brad: that’s how many content sites view you. As a slave that should dutifully visit without ever questioning. Oh, and you should also add some “user generated content” while you’re there, so they can put an ad next to it and make lots of money off of your efforts.

    Ahmad: this is far beyond agreeing or not agreeing. They want my readers to visit and be dutiful little readers. And if having a snit is childish, then you might want to visit some other, more corporate blog. I think you got me confused with some press release or something.

  18. Brad: that’s how many content sites view you. As a slave that should dutifully visit without ever questioning. Oh, and you should also add some “user generated content” while you’re there, so they can put an ad next to it and make lots of money off of your efforts.

    Ahmad: this is far beyond agreeing or not agreeing. They want my readers to visit and be dutiful little readers. And if having a snit is childish, then you might want to visit some other, more corporate blog. I think you got me confused with some press release or something.

  19. Robert … I think this is one of those things that cannot be settled by opinions.

    People claim that partial feeds draw users to a site versus full feeds that people use to send people to a site.

    Are you aware of any experiments or studies done on this subject?

  20. Robert … I think this is one of those things that cannot be settled by opinions.

    People claim that partial feeds draw users to a site versus full feeds that people use to send people to a site.

    Are you aware of any experiments or studies done on this subject?

  21. Robert … I think this is one of those things that cannot be settled by opinions.

    People claim that partial feeds draw users to a site versus full feeds that people use to send people to a site.

    Are you aware of any experiments or studies done on this subject?

  22. As a content publisher who provides partial text feeds I’m offended by this. Did you even try to understand the flipside Robert?

    For example, would you pay 10$/year to get full text feeds? Would you suffer ads in your feeds to get full text feeds?

    Sorry, but the world is changing. Feeds are being monetized either directly or by asking folk to come to the site if they want more information.

    It’s not about making users into “slaves” anymore than requiring you to pay for a newspaper makes you “slave”.

    All of that said, I prefer full text feeds, but if a blog is consistently good enough I don’t mind partial text.

    We dont’ do partial text across the board, only once a site approaches the million page per month band. And we only keep it partial if subscribers don’t drop like flies.

    Ultimately we’re trying to find a balance between actually making money off the content that costs us money, and giving our users what they want, how they want it.

    It’s a struggle though. Especially when you get rants like yours, Robert. Rants that don’t allow for any leniency. Any innovation. Any CHANGE.

  23. As a content publisher who provides partial text feeds I’m offended by this. Did you even try to understand the flipside Robert?

    For example, would you pay 10$/year to get full text feeds? Would you suffer ads in your feeds to get full text feeds?

    Sorry, but the world is changing. Feeds are being monetized either directly or by asking folk to come to the site if they want more information.

    It’s not about making users into “slaves” anymore than requiring you to pay for a newspaper makes you “slave”.

    All of that said, I prefer full text feeds, but if a blog is consistently good enough I don’t mind partial text.

    We dont’ do partial text across the board, only once a site approaches the million page per month band. And we only keep it partial if subscribers don’t drop like flies.

    Ultimately we’re trying to find a balance between actually making money off the content that costs us money, and giving our users what they want, how they want it.

    It’s a struggle though. Especially when you get rants like yours, Robert. Rants that don’t allow for any leniency. Any innovation. Any CHANGE.

  24. As a content publisher who provides partial text feeds I’m offended by this. Did you even try to understand the flipside Robert?

    For example, would you pay 10$/year to get full text feeds? Would you suffer ads in your feeds to get full text feeds?

    Sorry, but the world is changing. Feeds are being monetized either directly or by asking folk to come to the site if they want more information.

    It’s not about making users into “slaves” anymore than requiring you to pay for a newspaper makes you “slave”.

    All of that said, I prefer full text feeds, but if a blog is consistently good enough I don’t mind partial text.

    We dont’ do partial text across the board, only once a site approaches the million page per month band. And we only keep it partial if subscribers don’t drop like flies.

    Ultimately we’re trying to find a balance between actually making money off the content that costs us money, and giving our users what they want, how they want it.

    It’s a struggle though. Especially when you get rants like yours, Robert. Rants that don’t allow for any leniency. Any innovation. Any CHANGE.

  25. No not at all, there is a reason your blog is so popular, because of the passion you bring to it. However I think in some cases you may get carried away and not realize it. E.g. the title of this blog entry “Can I shoot someone?” sure of course you don’t mean that but its a tad overkill for someone looking for a link and not happening to provide full text feeds!

  26. No not at all, there is a reason your blog is so popular, because of the passion you bring to it. However I think in some cases you may get carried away and not realize it. E.g. the title of this blog entry “Can I shoot someone?” sure of course you don’t mean that but its a tad overkill for someone looking for a link and not happening to provide full text feeds!

  27. Patrick: When we put partial feeds on blogs, we see website traffic go up more than 25-70%, depending on the blog, time of day, day of the week, number of posts, etc.

  28. Patrick: When we put partial feeds on blogs, we see website traffic go up more than 25-70%, depending on the blog, time of day, day of the week, number of posts, etc.

  29. No not at all, there is a reason your blog is so popular, because of the passion you bring to it. However I think in some cases you may get carried away and not realize it. E.g. the title of this blog entry “Can I shoot someone?” sure of course you don’t mean that but its a tad overkill for someone looking for a link and not happening to provide full text feeds!

  30. Patrick: When we put partial feeds on blogs, we see website traffic go up more than 25-70%, depending on the blog, time of day, day of the week, number of posts, etc.

  31. Jeremy: if that’s true, then can you at least offer both? Either way, I have 740 feeds and that’s too many. I’m getting rid of any that are partial text. Feeds that are partial text treat me like a slave. I’m tired of being treated like a slave.

    I don’t mind advertising, if done well. AKA, like Google. User-centric and all that.

  32. Jeremy: if that’s true, then can you at least offer both? Either way, I have 740 feeds and that’s too many. I’m getting rid of any that are partial text. Feeds that are partial text treat me like a slave. I’m tired of being treated like a slave.

    I don’t mind advertising, if done well. AKA, like Google. User-centric and all that.

  33. Jeremy: if that’s true, then can you at least offer both? Either way, I have 740 feeds and that’s too many. I’m getting rid of any that are partial text. Feeds that are partial text treat me like a slave. I’m tired of being treated like a slave.

    I don’t mind advertising, if done well. AKA, like Google. User-centric and all that.

  34. Patrick: don’t know of any studies. I don’t really care about studies. Do you need studies to tell you whether something is good or not?

    If you think partial text are bettter for readers, then, fine, but offer BOTH!!! That way you are treating your readers with respect. Those who like partial text will feel better. Those, who, like me, prefer full text will feel better too.

  35. Patrick: don’t know of any studies. I don’t really care about studies. Do you need studies to tell you whether something is good or not?

    If you think partial text are bettter for readers, then, fine, but offer BOTH!!! That way you are treating your readers with respect. Those who like partial text will feel better. Those, who, like me, prefer full text will feel better too.

  36. Patrick: don’t know of any studies. I don’t really care about studies. Do you need studies to tell you whether something is good or not?

    If you think partial text are bettter for readers, then, fine, but offer BOTH!!! That way you are treating your readers with respect. Those who like partial text will feel better. Those, who, like me, prefer full text will feel better too.

  37. Robert: Offer both? Like the 360? Both confuses users. As I said, we’re not making you into a slave. We’re listening to the market for each and every blog that transitions.

    The real question here, though, is how can we make feeds work for publishers. Ultimately whatever really works for publishers will really work for users too.

    I don’t feel partial text feeds are the answer, but they’re better than doing nothing.

    Instead of whining about how you’re a “slave” (still dont’ see how that’s the case, since you can choose to leave, you can leave feedback, you can email / skype / msn / call me, etc) why not try and think up a solution?

    As a publisher WE’RE trying. For our users, and for us.

    And saying we should offer every option is a bit non-sensical as well. Would you ask that a newspaper offer both a paid and a free version, and let users choose? How, from a business perspective, do we justify full text feeds? More ads in them? A large segment of the market hates ads in feeds more than they hate partial text feeds.

    This is a serious balancing act, and not an easy one.

    As I said, we’re trying. But that doesn’t mean it’s an easy trick to pull off.

  38. Robert: Offer both? Like the 360? Both confuses users. As I said, we’re not making you into a slave. We’re listening to the market for each and every blog that transitions.

    The real question here, though, is how can we make feeds work for publishers. Ultimately whatever really works for publishers will really work for users too.

    I don’t feel partial text feeds are the answer, but they’re better than doing nothing.

    Instead of whining about how you’re a “slave” (still dont’ see how that’s the case, since you can choose to leave, you can leave feedback, you can email / skype / msn / call me, etc) why not try and think up a solution?

    As a publisher WE’RE trying. For our users, and for us.

    And saying we should offer every option is a bit non-sensical as well. Would you ask that a newspaper offer both a paid and a free version, and let users choose? How, from a business perspective, do we justify full text feeds? More ads in them? A large segment of the market hates ads in feeds more than they hate partial text feeds.

    This is a serious balancing act, and not an easy one.

    As I said, we’re trying. But that doesn’t mean it’s an easy trick to pull off.

  39. Robert: Offer both? Like the 360? Both confuses users. As I said, we’re not making you into a slave. We’re listening to the market for each and every blog that transitions.

    The real question here, though, is how can we make feeds work for publishers. Ultimately whatever really works for publishers will really work for users too.

    I don’t feel partial text feeds are the answer, but they’re better than doing nothing.

    Instead of whining about how you’re a “slave” (still dont’ see how that’s the case, since you can choose to leave, you can leave feedback, you can email / skype / msn / call me, etc) why not try and think up a solution?

    As a publisher WE’RE trying. For our users, and for us.

    And saying we should offer every option is a bit non-sensical as well. Would you ask that a newspaper offer both a paid and a free version, and let users choose? How, from a business perspective, do we justify full text feeds? More ads in them? A large segment of the market hates ads in feeds more than they hate partial text feeds.

    This is a serious balancing act, and not an easy one.

    As I said, we’re trying. But that doesn’t mean it’s an easy trick to pull off.

  40. Scoble, how about this. If we offered full-text feeds with ads as well as partial text feeds without ads, for each blog as well as each category of blog we run as well as for the network of 60 blogs.

    Would that work?

    As I said, we’re still figuring this out. Happy to hear what you have to say :)

  41. Scoble, how about this. If we offered full-text feeds with ads as well as partial text feeds without ads, for each blog as well as each category of blog we run as well as for the network of 60 blogs.

    Would that work?

    As I said, we’re still figuring this out. Happy to hear what you have to say :)

  42. Scoble, how about this. If we offered full-text feeds with ads as well as partial text feeds without ads, for each blog as well as each category of blog we run as well as for the network of 60 blogs.

    Would that work?

    As I said, we’re still figuring this out. Happy to hear what you have to say :)

  43. Jeremy: yes, that works for me. I subscribe to feeds with ads, as long as they are full text.

    James: my feed includes both full-text and partial-text. I’ll see if they can fix that to display my full-text feed.

    Or, you might need to get a news aggregator that lets you see the full-text feed. Sorry.

  44. Jeremy: yes, that works for me. I subscribe to feeds with ads, as long as they are full text.

    James: my feed includes both full-text and partial-text. I’ll see if they can fix that to display my full-text feed.

    Or, you might need to get a news aggregator that lets you see the full-text feed. Sorry.

  45. Jeremy: yes, that works for me. I subscribe to feeds with ads, as long as they are full text.

    James: my feed includes both full-text and partial-text. I’ll see if they can fix that to display my full-text feed.

    Or, you might need to get a news aggregator that lets you see the full-text feed. Sorry.

  46. >Instead of whining about how you’re a “slave” (still dont’ see how that’s the case, since you can choose to leave, you can leave feedback, you can email / skype / msn / call me, etc) why not try and think up a solution?

    I thought up the solution already: offer full text feeds. Damn, is it really that hard? If you have business models that need me to visit your Web site that’s your problem, not mine.

    Figure out how to fix the business model, if that’s what is the problem.

  47. >Instead of whining about how you’re a “slave” (still dont’ see how that’s the case, since you can choose to leave, you can leave feedback, you can email / skype / msn / call me, etc) why not try and think up a solution?

    I thought up the solution already: offer full text feeds. Damn, is it really that hard? If you have business models that need me to visit your Web site that’s your problem, not mine.

    Figure out how to fix the business model, if that’s what is the problem.

  48. >Instead of whining about how you’re a “slave” (still dont’ see how that’s the case, since you can choose to leave, you can leave feedback, you can email / skype / msn / call me, etc) why not try and think up a solution?

    I thought up the solution already: offer full text feeds. Damn, is it really that hard? If you have business models that need me to visit your Web site that’s your problem, not mine.

    Figure out how to fix the business model, if that’s what is the problem.

  49. You know, the only revenue model left for newspapers is all those ads on their page. If you won’t even go to their site at all – ever – that’s hammering the last nail in the journalism coffin.

    And that won’t help democracy.

  50. You know, the only revenue model left for newspapers is all those ads on their page. If you won’t even go to their site at all – ever – that’s hammering the last nail in the journalism coffin.

    And that won’t help democracy.

  51. You know, the only revenue model left for newspapers is all those ads on their page. If you won’t even go to their site at all – ever – that’s hammering the last nail in the journalism coffin.

    And that won’t help democracy.

  52. “Maybe the folks who treat people like info slaves are the real egotists.”

    The company you work for treats people like info slaves.

  53. “Maybe the folks who treat people like info slaves are the real egotists.”

    The company you work for treats people like info slaves.

  54. “Maybe the folks who treat people like info slaves are the real egotists.”

    The company you work for treats people like info slaves.

  55. Larry: it seems that there’s plenty of new style business out here. Why did AOL buy Weblogsinc.com for $25 million?

    But, thanks for a new argument! Advertising is good for democracy! That’s a good one.

  56. Larry: it seems that there’s plenty of new style business out here. Why did AOL buy Weblogsinc.com for $25 million?

    But, thanks for a new argument! Advertising is good for democracy! That’s a good one.

  57. Larry: it seems that there’s plenty of new style business out here. Why did AOL buy Weblogsinc.com for $25 million?

    But, thanks for a new argument! Advertising is good for democracy! That’s a good one.

  58. Um…slaves?

    Holy crap, exaagerate much? I know that on my phone, I like partial text feeds, about twenty lines. That lets me decide if I want to see more or blow it off. one line’s too little, but when it’s a full text feed, then I have no choice in the matter.

    Full text forces you to be a goose getting stuffed, and you have no choice about it.

    That’s bad too, by the way.

  59. Um…slaves?

    Holy crap, exaagerate much? I know that on my phone, I like partial text feeds, about twenty lines. That lets me decide if I want to see more or blow it off. one line’s too little, but when it’s a full text feed, then I have no choice in the matter.

    Full text forces you to be a goose getting stuffed, and you have no choice about it.

    That’s bad too, by the way.

  60. Um…slaves?

    Holy crap, exaagerate much? I know that on my phone, I like partial text feeds, about twenty lines. That lets me decide if I want to see more or blow it off. one line’s too little, but when it’s a full text feed, then I have no choice in the matter.

    Full text forces you to be a goose getting stuffed, and you have no choice about it.

    That’s bad too, by the way.

  61. “Oh, and Larry: why can’t we put ads into feeds? I don’t know of any rule against that”

    Hmm. Which is worse, the wrath of Scoble or the wrath of Winer?

  62. “Oh, and Larry: why can’t we put ads into feeds? I don’t know of any rule against that”

    Hmm. Which is worse, the wrath of Scoble or the wrath of Winer?

  63. “Oh, and Larry: why can’t we put ads into feeds? I don’t know of any rule against that”

    Hmm. Which is worse, the wrath of Scoble or the wrath of Winer?

  64. How do you send people to those other websites? I don’t get it. Yours is the only one I see when I visit. Certainly, the Google reader doesn’t show links to other sites? Is it your static sidebar? Are you the advertiser here, or are they?

    I think this may demonstrate how inbred web 2.0 is becoming. No one who isn’t related can…relate.

  65. How do you send people to those other websites? I don’t get it. Yours is the only one I see when I visit. Certainly, the Google reader doesn’t show links to other sites? Is it your static sidebar? Are you the advertiser here, or are they?

    I think this may demonstrate how inbred web 2.0 is becoming. No one who isn’t related can…relate.

  66. How do you send people to those other websites? I don’t get it. Yours is the only one I see when I visit. Certainly, the Google reader doesn’t show links to other sites? Is it your static sidebar? Are you the advertiser here, or are they?

    I think this may demonstrate how inbred web 2.0 is becoming. No one who isn’t related can…relate.

  67. As I said earlier this isn’t a simple issue. Robert, you trying to make it into one (without actually caring about the people you’re trying to change) is rather amusing.

    Full text feeds with ads have issues. Partial text feeds have issues. Some companies, like weblogs inc, do a full feed but strip all the links out making the feed readers “second class citizens” according to some.

    Why aren’t you willing to actually talk about this, instead of shoving what you want as gospel?

  68. As I said earlier this isn’t a simple issue. Robert, you trying to make it into one (without actually caring about the people you’re trying to change) is rather amusing.

    Full text feeds with ads have issues. Partial text feeds have issues. Some companies, like weblogs inc, do a full feed but strip all the links out making the feed readers “second class citizens” according to some.

    Why aren’t you willing to actually talk about this, instead of shoving what you want as gospel?

  69. As I said earlier this isn’t a simple issue. Robert, you trying to make it into one (without actually caring about the people you’re trying to change) is rather amusing.

    Full text feeds with ads have issues. Partial text feeds have issues. Some companies, like weblogs inc, do a full feed but strip all the links out making the feed readers “second class citizens” according to some.

    Why aren’t you willing to actually talk about this, instead of shoving what you want as gospel?

  70. >>Oh, and Larry: why can’t we put ads into feeds? I don’t know of any rule against that.

    Because there is no independant third party that measures the metrics of how many eyeballs view an ad in an RSS feed. If you don’t know how many people see an ad, there is no way to assign a value to it. Right now, as we both have previously discussed, there is no way to know how many people see anything in RSS.

    You can’t sell ads for that.

  71. >>Oh, and Larry: why can’t we put ads into feeds? I don’t know of any rule against that.

    Because there is no independant third party that measures the metrics of how many eyeballs view an ad in an RSS feed. If you don’t know how many people see an ad, there is no way to assign a value to it. Right now, as we both have previously discussed, there is no way to know how many people see anything in RSS.

    You can’t sell ads for that.

  72. >>Oh, and Larry: why can’t we put ads into feeds? I don’t know of any rule against that.

    Because there is no independant third party that measures the metrics of how many eyeballs view an ad in an RSS feed. If you don’t know how many people see an ad, there is no way to assign a value to it. Right now, as we both have previously discussed, there is no way to know how many people see anything in RSS.

    You can’t sell ads for that.

  73. >>Larry: it seems that there’s plenty of new style business out here. Why did AOL buy Weblogsinc.com for $25 million?

    If AOL could support a worldwide bureau of reporters and publish an online newspaper, that would be great, but I don’t see the industry business model for everyone else in that purchase.

  74. >>Larry: it seems that there’s plenty of new style business out here. Why did AOL buy Weblogsinc.com for $25 million?

    If AOL could support a worldwide bureau of reporters and publish an online newspaper, that would be great, but I don’t see the industry business model for everyone else in that purchase.

  75. >>Larry: it seems that there’s plenty of new style business out here. Why did AOL buy Weblogsinc.com for $25 million?

    If AOL could support a worldwide bureau of reporters and publish an online newspaper, that would be great, but I don’t see the industry business model for everyone else in that purchase.

  76. “Why aren’t you willing to actually talk about this, instead of shoving what you want as gospel?”

    Well his title isn’t “Microsoft Debater”, it’s “Microsoft Evangelist”. How many evangelists do you know that are willing to debate the existance of God? ;)

    Black and White is defined by him, it’s in his title.

    Larry: Ever heard of web bugs? They have them in RSS feeds too. It’s one way you can measure eyeballs on ads in RSS feeds.

    http://www.eff.org/Privacy/Marketing/web_bug.html

  77. “Why aren’t you willing to actually talk about this, instead of shoving what you want as gospel?”

    Well his title isn’t “Microsoft Debater”, it’s “Microsoft Evangelist”. How many evangelists do you know that are willing to debate the existance of God? ;)

    Black and White is defined by him, it’s in his title.

    Larry: Ever heard of web bugs? They have them in RSS feeds too. It’s one way you can measure eyeballs on ads in RSS feeds.

    http://www.eff.org/Privacy/Marketing/web_bug.html

  78. “Why aren’t you willing to actually talk about this, instead of shoving what you want as gospel?”

    Well his title isn’t “Microsoft Debater”, it’s “Microsoft Evangelist”. How many evangelists do you know that are willing to debate the existance of God? ;)

    Black and White is defined by him, it’s in his title.

    Larry: Ever heard of web bugs? They have them in RSS feeds too. It’s one way you can measure eyeballs on ads in RSS feeds.

    http://www.eff.org/Privacy/Marketing/web_bug.html

  79. Oh, on topic:

    Full text feeds are nice, but you can’t comment through them. You could write a blog post and trackback to the post, but not everyone respects/uses/allows trackbacks. So if you want to discuss the post with the author, you have to go to the site and post a comment anyway. (assuming they allow comment, most egotistical folk enjoy a one-way conversation. You to them).

    Partial text feeds are ok, provided they give me an informative slug not just the first 200 or so characters. That’s useless.

  80. Oh, on topic:

    Full text feeds are nice, but you can’t comment through them. You could write a blog post and trackback to the post, but not everyone respects/uses/allows trackbacks. So if you want to discuss the post with the author, you have to go to the site and post a comment anyway. (assuming they allow comment, most egotistical folk enjoy a one-way conversation. You to them).

    Partial text feeds are ok, provided they give me an informative slug not just the first 200 or so characters. That’s useless.

  81. Oh, on topic:

    Full text feeds are nice, but you can’t comment through them. You could write a blog post and trackback to the post, but not everyone respects/uses/allows trackbacks. So if you want to discuss the post with the author, you have to go to the site and post a comment anyway. (assuming they allow comment, most egotistical folk enjoy a one-way conversation. You to them).

    Partial text feeds are ok, provided they give me an informative slug not just the first 200 or so characters. That’s useless.

  82. I did not read through all the comments but I *know* I’m not the only one wondering where the real Scoble went. Dude, you’re sounding more and more like a pompous self-important jackass with these stupid high-school “i’m-not-linking-to-you” threats.

    Remember, the higher you climb, the harder you fall. And to think I used to really love Scoble’s down-to-earth’d-ness. Yeesh.

  83. I did not read through all the comments but I *know* I’m not the only one wondering where the real Scoble went. Dude, you’re sounding more and more like a pompous self-important jackass with these stupid high-school “i’m-not-linking-to-you” threats.

    Remember, the higher you climb, the harder you fall. And to think I used to really love Scoble’s down-to-earth’d-ness. Yeesh.

  84. I did not read through all the comments but I *know* I’m not the only one wondering where the real Scoble went. Dude, you’re sounding more and more like a pompous self-important jackass with these stupid high-school “i’m-not-linking-to-you” threats.

    Remember, the higher you climb, the harder you fall. And to think I used to really love Scoble’s down-to-earth’d-ness. Yeesh.

  85. black_cat:> Dude, you’re sounding more and more like a pompous self-important jackass with these stupid high-school “i’m-not-linking-to-you” threats.

    Heheh! I’m being told off by someone who won’t even use his or her real name. What a hoot!

  86. black_cat:> Dude, you’re sounding more and more like a pompous self-important jackass with these stupid high-school “i’m-not-linking-to-you” threats.

    Heheh! I’m being told off by someone who won’t even use his or her real name. What a hoot!

  87. black_cat:> Dude, you’re sounding more and more like a pompous self-important jackass with these stupid high-school “i’m-not-linking-to-you” threats.

    Heheh! I’m being told off by someone who won’t even use his or her real name. What a hoot!

  88. Thanks Scott. Webbugs aren’t precise enough when you consider all the variables with RSS, what if images are scraped before display, what about an aggregator that grabs the RSS and feeds to multiple clients.

    When you consider the auditing and due diligence that goes into tracking print circulation, there are really no metrics that match up online, especially for RSS.

    I’m with you, Robert, don’t bite my head off, but what you’re asking is like telling Take Two to give away Grand Theft Auto 8 for free and then make their money by putting an ad in the game.

    >>Advertising is good for democracy! That’s a good one.

    Something has to support journalism, and ads are about all that is left. Imagine what this (or any other free) country would be like if there were no independant news operations.

  89. Thanks Scott. Webbugs aren’t precise enough when you consider all the variables with RSS, what if images are scraped before display, what about an aggregator that grabs the RSS and feeds to multiple clients.

    When you consider the auditing and due diligence that goes into tracking print circulation, there are really no metrics that match up online, especially for RSS.

    I’m with you, Robert, don’t bite my head off, but what you’re asking is like telling Take Two to give away Grand Theft Auto 8 for free and then make their money by putting an ad in the game.

    >>Advertising is good for democracy! That’s a good one.

    Something has to support journalism, and ads are about all that is left. Imagine what this (or any other free) country would be like if there were no independant news operations.

  90. Thanks Scott. Webbugs aren’t precise enough when you consider all the variables with RSS, what if images are scraped before display, what about an aggregator that grabs the RSS and feeds to multiple clients.

    When you consider the auditing and due diligence that goes into tracking print circulation, there are really no metrics that match up online, especially for RSS.

    I’m with you, Robert, don’t bite my head off, but what you’re asking is like telling Take Two to give away Grand Theft Auto 8 for free and then make their money by putting an ad in the game.

    >>Advertising is good for democracy! That’s a good one.

    Something has to support journalism, and ads are about all that is left. Imagine what this (or any other free) country would be like if there were no independant news operations.

  91. I reckon none of you commenters have spotted what sparked off Robert’s ire! But I reckon I did.

    It was the responder’s automatic, robotic, non-human reply to his original post. Culminating in the insincere “…Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns”, which read like someone in a cubicle had just hit a key marked ‘end transmission’.

    Am I right, Robert? Certainly it would be enough to get me angry…

  92. I reckon none of you commenters have spotted what sparked off Robert’s ire! But I reckon I did.

    It was the responder’s automatic, robotic, non-human reply to his original post. Culminating in the insincere “…Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns”, which read like someone in a cubicle had just hit a key marked ‘end transmission’.

    Am I right, Robert? Certainly it would be enough to get me angry…

  93. I reckon none of you commenters have spotted what sparked off Robert’s ire! But I reckon I did.

    It was the responder’s automatic, robotic, non-human reply to his original post. Culminating in the insincere “…Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns”, which read like someone in a cubicle had just hit a key marked ‘end transmission’.

    Am I right, Robert? Certainly it would be enough to get me angry…

  94. Larry: the funny thing is that the site owner who sent me the email doesn’t run a journalistic site.

    The thing is we need to come up with a new business model. Come on, we can do it.

    Remember 1987 when everyone said that the only way to make money is with banner ads? That was proven pretty wrong by those two guys from Stanford.

    There’s plenty of business models out here that don’t require treating your users like jerks.

  95. Larry: the funny thing is that the site owner who sent me the email doesn’t run a journalistic site.

    The thing is we need to come up with a new business model. Come on, we can do it.

    Remember 1987 when everyone said that the only way to make money is with banner ads? That was proven pretty wrong by those two guys from Stanford.

    There’s plenty of business models out here that don’t require treating your users like jerks.

  96. Larry: the funny thing is that the site owner who sent me the email doesn’t run a journalistic site.

    The thing is we need to come up with a new business model. Come on, we can do it.

    Remember 1987 when everyone said that the only way to make money is with banner ads? That was proven pretty wrong by those two guys from Stanford.

    There’s plenty of business models out here that don’t require treating your users like jerks.

  97. Wow, a ready-to-microwave parody, with some Daniel Waters (‘Heathers’) sprinkles…

    No full-text feeds? That’s downright EVIL INCARNATE. Partial feeds suck losers dry. If you wanna f*ck with the eagles, you have to learn to fly. And err, NewsGator says I have tons of subscribers. None of them for you. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I’m not going to be your slave today. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. No sirreeeeeeeee. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I am the most popular blogger around, you can’t play with me. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I wanta shoot someone. As the only place different social types can genuinely get along with each other is in heaven.

  98. Wow, a ready-to-microwave parody, with some Daniel Waters (‘Heathers’) sprinkles…

    No full-text feeds? That’s downright EVIL INCARNATE. Partial feeds suck losers dry. If you wanna f*ck with the eagles, you have to learn to fly. And err, NewsGator says I have tons of subscribers. None of them for you. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I’m not going to be your slave today. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. No sirreeeeeeeee. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I am the most popular blogger around, you can’t play with me. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I wanta shoot someone. As the only place different social types can genuinely get along with each other is in heaven.

  99. Wow, a ready-to-microwave parody, with some Daniel Waters (‘Heathers’) sprinkles…

    No full-text feeds? That’s downright EVIL INCARNATE. Partial feeds suck losers dry. If you wanna f*ck with the eagles, you have to learn to fly. And err, NewsGator says I have tons of subscribers. None of them for you. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I’m not going to be your slave today. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. No sirreeeeeeeee. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I am the most popular blogger around, you can’t play with me. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. Nah. I wanta shoot someone. As the only place different social types can genuinely get along with each other is in heaven.

  100. Again, I’m with ya. I made the pigrimage to MS last year asking for help. I’m working on several right now. But those two guys from Stanford are making most of their money through banner ads.

  101. Again, I’m with ya. I made the pigrimage to MS last year asking for help. I’m working on several right now. But those two guys from Stanford are making most of their money through banner ads.

  102. Again, I’m with ya. I made the pigrimage to MS last year asking for help. I’m working on several right now. But those two guys from Stanford are making most of their money through banner ads.

  103. Scoble, that’s nit-picking. They still made most of their money of ads. Nobody ever says “my business model is banner ads”. They say “my business model is ads”.

    If you can come up with a new business model, great. But that’s not what you asked for in your rant. You asked for publishers to give you everything for nothing.

    Readers, ultimately, have a choice. They can pay for their content with:

    1. Money
    2. Ads
    3. Attention
    4. Information
    5. Time

    Which, to me, means you either have spend to get ad-free feeds, you have to get ads in your feeds, you have to be willing to click through to a site, you have to be willing to give the comapnies info or you need to be willing to somehow give your time.

    I’m all for new business models, but you can’t just say a line like that without copping to something.

    I agree with a previous commenter. This just sounds like you decided to throw a hissy fit at the start and now you’re trying to spin it in such a way that it’s intelligent.

    You want a conversation? Fine. Let’s have a conversation. But why does the conversation have to happen HERE? I feel so SLAVED by having to come to your site just to see if there are updates. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.

  104. Scoble, that’s nit-picking. They still made most of their money of ads. Nobody ever says “my business model is banner ads”. They say “my business model is ads”.

    If you can come up with a new business model, great. But that’s not what you asked for in your rant. You asked for publishers to give you everything for nothing.

    Readers, ultimately, have a choice. They can pay for their content with:

    1. Money
    2. Ads
    3. Attention
    4. Information
    5. Time

    Which, to me, means you either have spend to get ad-free feeds, you have to get ads in your feeds, you have to be willing to click through to a site, you have to be willing to give the comapnies info or you need to be willing to somehow give your time.

    I’m all for new business models, but you can’t just say a line like that without copping to something.

    I agree with a previous commenter. This just sounds like you decided to throw a hissy fit at the start and now you’re trying to spin it in such a way that it’s intelligent.

    You want a conversation? Fine. Let’s have a conversation. But why does the conversation have to happen HERE? I feel so SLAVED by having to come to your site just to see if there are updates. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.

  105. Scoble, that’s nit-picking. They still made most of their money of ads. Nobody ever says “my business model is banner ads”. They say “my business model is ads”.

    If you can come up with a new business model, great. But that’s not what you asked for in your rant. You asked for publishers to give you everything for nothing.

    Readers, ultimately, have a choice. They can pay for their content with:

    1. Money
    2. Ads
    3. Attention
    4. Information
    5. Time

    Which, to me, means you either have spend to get ad-free feeds, you have to get ads in your feeds, you have to be willing to click through to a site, you have to be willing to give the comapnies info or you need to be willing to somehow give your time.

    I’m all for new business models, but you can’t just say a line like that without copping to something.

    I agree with a previous commenter. This just sounds like you decided to throw a hissy fit at the start and now you’re trying to spin it in such a way that it’s intelligent.

    You want a conversation? Fine. Let’s have a conversation. But why does the conversation have to happen HERE? I feel so SLAVED by having to come to your site just to see if there are updates. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.

  106. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.

    Wow. Brilliant phrasing. How true.

  107. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.

    Wow. Brilliant phrasing. How true.

  108. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.

    Wow. Brilliant phrasing. How true.

  109. Jeremy: >Nobody ever says “my business model is banner ads”.

    Um, you don’t get around too much. Actually they do say that at advertising companies. Quite often, in fact.

    There’s a big difference between doing TV advertising and doing print advertising or doing outdoor advertising. It’s all advertising, to be certain, but it is different.

    There’s a huge difference between user-friendly advertising and those other types (interstitials, banners, etc).

    And, why have the conversation here? Cause I’m the loudmouth who posted this to start it off.

  110. Jeremy: >Nobody ever says “my business model is banner ads”.

    Um, you don’t get around too much. Actually they do say that at advertising companies. Quite often, in fact.

    There’s a big difference between doing TV advertising and doing print advertising or doing outdoor advertising. It’s all advertising, to be certain, but it is different.

    There’s a huge difference between user-friendly advertising and those other types (interstitials, banners, etc).

    And, why have the conversation here? Cause I’m the loudmouth who posted this to start it off.

  111. I’m totally with Robert: give me my full-text feed or I’ll go elsewhere. My information firehose drinking time is too valuable and limited for me to be wasting some of it making micro-payments to someone’s advertising engine.

  112. I’m totally with Robert: give me my full-text feed or I’ll go elsewhere. My information firehose drinking time is too valuable and limited for me to be wasting some of it making micro-payments to someone’s advertising engine.

  113. Jeremy: >Nobody ever says “my business model is banner ads”.

    Um, you don’t get around too much. Actually they do say that at advertising companies. Quite often, in fact.

    There’s a big difference between doing TV advertising and doing print advertising or doing outdoor advertising. It’s all advertising, to be certain, but it is different.

    There’s a huge difference between user-friendly advertising and those other types (interstitials, banners, etc).

    And, why have the conversation here? Cause I’m the loudmouth who posted this to start it off.

  114. I’m totally with Robert: give me my full-text feed or I’ll go elsewhere. My information firehose drinking time is too valuable and limited for me to be wasting some of it making micro-payments to someone’s advertising engine.

  115. Scoble. I work with many of the ad companies. I was at AdTech. Nobody says “banner ads”. Because everyone knows banner ads don’t work. Nobody really ever said their model was banner ads. I was there too, right in the thick of it, helping run some of the largest sites on the net at the time.

    “There’s a huge difference between user-friendly advertising and those other types (interstitials, banners, etc).”

    Yeah? What is it? I mean, Google’s now doing animated ads, image ads, banner ads, video ads… How is Google all that different?

    “And, why have the conversation here? Cause I’m the loudmouth who posted this to start it off. ”

    *sigh*

    Fine, have it alone. Sometimes conversations require meeting in the middle. You’ve got a publisher right here talking to you, and you’re pushing me away. So, fine, I’ll go away.

    This isn’t conversation-friendly blogging.

  116. Scoble. I work with many of the ad companies. I was at AdTech. Nobody says “banner ads”. Because everyone knows banner ads don’t work. Nobody really ever said their model was banner ads. I was there too, right in the thick of it, helping run some of the largest sites on the net at the time.

    “There’s a huge difference between user-friendly advertising and those other types (interstitials, banners, etc).”

    Yeah? What is it? I mean, Google’s now doing animated ads, image ads, banner ads, video ads… How is Google all that different?

    “And, why have the conversation here? Cause I’m the loudmouth who posted this to start it off. ”

    *sigh*

    Fine, have it alone. Sometimes conversations require meeting in the middle. You’ve got a publisher right here talking to you, and you’re pushing me away. So, fine, I’ll go away.

    This isn’t conversation-friendly blogging.

  117. Scoble. I work with many of the ad companies. I was at AdTech. Nobody says “banner ads”. Because everyone knows banner ads don’t work. Nobody really ever said their model was banner ads. I was there too, right in the thick of it, helping run some of the largest sites on the net at the time.

    “There’s a huge difference between user-friendly advertising and those other types (interstitials, banners, etc).”

    Yeah? What is it? I mean, Google’s now doing animated ads, image ads, banner ads, video ads… How is Google all that different?

    “And, why have the conversation here? Cause I’m the loudmouth who posted this to start it off. ”

    *sigh*

    Fine, have it alone. Sometimes conversations require meeting in the middle. You’ve got a publisher right here talking to you, and you’re pushing me away. So, fine, I’ll go away.

    This isn’t conversation-friendly blogging.

  118. “You want a conversation? Fine. Let’s have a conversation. But why does the conversation have to happen HERE? I feel so SLAVED by having to come to your site just to see if there are updates. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.”

    Erm … Jeremy, there’s Scoble’s cell phone number and email addres on this blog. You could, like, call him? It might be the fastest way to discover if you guys can work it out. Of course, we won’t be able to follow the conversation word by word. We don’t mind. Talk it over, see if you can agree on something and let us know if it was worth it.

  119. “You want a conversation? Fine. Let’s have a conversation. But why does the conversation have to happen HERE? I feel so SLAVED by having to come to your site just to see if there are updates. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.”

    Erm … Jeremy, there’s Scoble’s cell phone number and email addres on this blog. You could, like, call him? It might be the fastest way to discover if you guys can work it out. Of course, we won’t be able to follow the conversation word by word. We don’t mind. Talk it over, see if you can agree on something and let us know if it was worth it.

  120. “You want a conversation? Fine. Let’s have a conversation. But why does the conversation have to happen HERE? I feel so SLAVED by having to come to your site just to see if there are updates. This isn’t a real conversation. It’s more like leaving post-its on a bulletin board.”

    Erm … Jeremy, there’s Scoble’s cell phone number and email addres on this blog. You could, like, call him? It might be the fastest way to discover if you guys can work it out. Of course, we won’t be able to follow the conversation word by word. We don’t mind. Talk it over, see if you can agree on something and let us know if it was worth it.

  121. Peter, it’s okay I’ve got Scoble’s Skype, MSN, email, cell and work numbers.

    I was trying to be ironic. If Scoble’s asking for massive change, he needs to be ready to hear why things are the way they are (without prejudice) and he needs to be willing to have a conversation.

    Telling me that he’s right and the 5 reasons why he’s right and why all publishers and advertisers are evil (except Google) isn’t helping the conversation.

    I want to hear if he really wants ads in feeds. What he feels this “new business model” should be based on, from a business perspective. How advertisers / publishers / users needs should balance.

    I asked, and keep asking, because I have the sneaking suspicion this is Scoble in “uber elite mode” where he feels that what frustrates him is exactly what companies should respond to.

    We call this living locally, applying globally. It’s unhealthy for anyone, but especially someone with a platform.

    With great power comes… What, the ability rant really ineffectively? ;-)

    Besides, I won’t invade Scoble’s time to talk about this. I know how busy he is first hand. If this is still an issue when I’m on campus again in Feb we’ll talk it out.

    I’m not actually upset, I just don’t see the room for discussion in Scoble’s position.

  122. Peter, it’s okay I’ve got Scoble’s Skype, MSN, email, cell and work numbers.

    I was trying to be ironic. If Scoble’s asking for massive change, he needs to be ready to hear why things are the way they are (without prejudice) and he needs to be willing to have a conversation.

    Telling me that he’s right and the 5 reasons why he’s right and why all publishers and advertisers are evil (except Google) isn’t helping the conversation.

    I want to hear if he really wants ads in feeds. What he feels this “new business model” should be based on, from a business perspective. How advertisers / publishers / users needs should balance.

    I asked, and keep asking, because I have the sneaking suspicion this is Scoble in “uber elite mode” where he feels that what frustrates him is exactly what companies should respond to.

    We call this living locally, applying globally. It’s unhealthy for anyone, but especially someone with a platform.

    With great power comes… What, the ability rant really ineffectively? ;-)

    Besides, I won’t invade Scoble’s time to talk about this. I know how busy he is first hand. If this is still an issue when I’m on campus again in Feb we’ll talk it out.

    I’m not actually upset, I just don’t see the room for discussion in Scoble’s position.

  123. Peter, it’s okay I’ve got Scoble’s Skype, MSN, email, cell and work numbers.

    I was trying to be ironic. If Scoble’s asking for massive change, he needs to be ready to hear why things are the way they are (without prejudice) and he needs to be willing to have a conversation.

    Telling me that he’s right and the 5 reasons why he’s right and why all publishers and advertisers are evil (except Google) isn’t helping the conversation.

    I want to hear if he really wants ads in feeds. What he feels this “new business model” should be based on, from a business perspective. How advertisers / publishers / users needs should balance.

    I asked, and keep asking, because I have the sneaking suspicion this is Scoble in “uber elite mode” where he feels that what frustrates him is exactly what companies should respond to.

    We call this living locally, applying globally. It’s unhealthy for anyone, but especially someone with a platform.

    With great power comes… What, the ability rant really ineffectively? ;-)

    Besides, I won’t invade Scoble’s time to talk about this. I know how busy he is first hand. If this is still an issue when I’m on campus again in Feb we’ll talk it out.

    I’m not actually upset, I just don’t see the room for discussion in Scoble’s position.

  124. Robert ‘Simply’ Scoble asks “Can I Shoot Someone?” (I’m blog whoring again)

    [NOTE: This post is intended to be humorous and NOT an explicit approval of violence of any kind]
    Scoble is enraged by “partial text RSS feeds” and the fact that some sites think giving away the text in RSS could cause them a loss of revenu…

  125. Rock on! Mr Scoble. err … not sure about that shooting business though … (thinking smiley goes here)

    ps. you should get some smileys for your blog it may help calm you down a bit. You can never have too many smileys right. :)

  126. Rock on! Mr Scoble. err … not sure about that shooting business though … (thinking smiley goes here)

    ps. you should get some smileys for your blog it may help calm you down a bit. You can never have too many smileys right. :)

  127. Rock on! Mr Scoble. err … not sure about that shooting business though … (thinking smiley goes here)

    ps. you should get some smileys for your blog it may help calm you down a bit. You can never have too many smileys right. :)

  128. So full vs partial rages on…

    I publish full feeds, but only because I have nothing to lose. RSS is taking off, but it’s still not largely understood by the average user. To be charging into ‘full feeds are right all the time’ at this point seems a bit strange to me.

    Yes, I want to syndicate my content. But I respect the wishes of those that don’t. Whether I subscribe to a partial feed will depend on the quality of the content.

    If ‘A List Apart’ offered partial feeds, I would take them – gratefully (And not want to shoot them…).

    Of course, I don’t know who *this* post refers to and perhaps there is no reason for them not to have full feeds; but they obviously believe there is.

    Are we talking Blogs only here or all RSS content…?

    Most blogs at his point are either fluff or self promotional (at some level) – both these purposes have no reason not to publish full feeds…

    The issue here, I guess is mostly monetisation.

    I think an earlier commenter was fair to point out we need research and stats on full vs partial. I think it might show full feeds result in more subscribers and still get click throughs. I think it might also show that partial feeds, though resulting in less subscribers *might* have more targetted audiences and therefore yield greater results.

    If users subscribe to partial feeds it may be because they know it’s worth it. If they know it’s worth it it may be because they trust the source. If they trust the source they may be more likely potential customers/consumers/whatever.

    Maybe. We’ll see.

  129. So full vs partial rages on…

    I publish full feeds, but only because I have nothing to lose. RSS is taking off, but it’s still not largely understood by the average user. To be charging into ‘full feeds are right all the time’ at this point seems a bit strange to me.

    Yes, I want to syndicate my content. But I respect the wishes of those that don’t. Whether I subscribe to a partial feed will depend on the quality of the content.

    If ‘A List Apart’ offered partial feeds, I would take them – gratefully (And not want to shoot them…).

    Of course, I don’t know who *this* post refers to and perhaps there is no reason for them not to have full feeds; but they obviously believe there is.

    Are we talking Blogs only here or all RSS content…?

    Most blogs at his point are either fluff or self promotional (at some level) – both these purposes have no reason not to publish full feeds…

    The issue here, I guess is mostly monetisation.

    I think an earlier commenter was fair to point out we need research and stats on full vs partial. I think it might show full feeds result in more subscribers and still get click throughs. I think it might also show that partial feeds, though resulting in less subscribers *might* have more targetted audiences and therefore yield greater results.

    If users subscribe to partial feeds it may be because they know it’s worth it. If they know it’s worth it it may be because they trust the source. If they trust the source they may be more likely potential customers/consumers/whatever.

    Maybe. We’ll see.

  130. So full vs partial rages on…

    I publish full feeds, but only because I have nothing to lose. RSS is taking off, but it’s still not largely understood by the average user. To be charging into ‘full feeds are right all the time’ at this point seems a bit strange to me.

    Yes, I want to syndicate my content. But I respect the wishes of those that don’t. Whether I subscribe to a partial feed will depend on the quality of the content.

    If ‘A List Apart’ offered partial feeds, I would take them – gratefully (And not want to shoot them…).

    Of course, I don’t know who *this* post refers to and perhaps there is no reason for them not to have full feeds; but they obviously believe there is.

    Are we talking Blogs only here or all RSS content…?

    Most blogs at his point are either fluff or self promotional (at some level) – both these purposes have no reason not to publish full feeds…

    The issue here, I guess is mostly monetisation.

    I think an earlier commenter was fair to point out we need research and stats on full vs partial. I think it might show full feeds result in more subscribers and still get click throughs. I think it might also show that partial feeds, though resulting in less subscribers *might* have more targetted audiences and therefore yield greater results.

    If users subscribe to partial feeds it may be because they know it’s worth it. If they know it’s worth it it may be because they trust the source. If they trust the source they may be more likely potential customers/consumers/whatever.

    Maybe. We’ll see.

  131. FWIW, I read this post (in full text) via Bloglines, then decided, hell with it, and changed my site’s feed to full text.

    Yeah, I have an AdSense block on the right side, and yeah, I make tens of cents every month from it, but I’m willing to sacrifice all that to run a little experiment.

    I know this from my own use of RSS via Bloglines: I probably wind up visiting the sites where full text feeds are offered at least as much as the excerpt-feed sites. So we’ll see if that holds true for the bottom-feeders who have run out of everything else to do on the Web, including porn, poker and Viagra, and therefore have only my site left to live for. ;-)

  132. FWIW, I read this post (in full text) via Bloglines, then decided, hell with it, and changed my site’s feed to full text.

    Yeah, I have an AdSense block on the right side, and yeah, I make tens of cents every month from it, but I’m willing to sacrifice all that to run a little experiment.

    I know this from my own use of RSS via Bloglines: I probably wind up visiting the sites where full text feeds are offered at least as much as the excerpt-feed sites. So we’ll see if that holds true for the bottom-feeders who have run out of everything else to do on the Web, including porn, poker and Viagra, and therefore have only my site left to live for. ;-)

  133. FWIW, I read this post (in full text) via Bloglines, then decided, hell with it, and changed my site’s feed to full text.

    Yeah, I have an AdSense block on the right side, and yeah, I make tens of cents every month from it, but I’m willing to sacrifice all that to run a little experiment.

    I know this from my own use of RSS via Bloglines: I probably wind up visiting the sites where full text feeds are offered at least as much as the excerpt-feed sites. So we’ll see if that holds true for the bottom-feeders who have run out of everything else to do on the Web, including porn, poker and Viagra, and therefore have only my site left to live for. ;-)

  134. John: then do both.

    Robert, are you paying for that bandwidth? No, you aren’t. But you are using it. Can you show me any data that shows RSS feed ads have a positive return greater than the cost of the bandwidth used? I mean, you’re advocating something that most of the RSS users are going to *hate*, you should at least have SOME numbers showing the efficacy of your idea, or a link to such numbers.

    Because otherwise, you’re kind of trying to use your own sense of grandeur to get your way, and that’s a bit, oh, I don’t know, egotisitical?

  135. John: then do both.

    Robert, are you paying for that bandwidth? No, you aren’t. But you are using it. Can you show me any data that shows RSS feed ads have a positive return greater than the cost of the bandwidth used? I mean, you’re advocating something that most of the RSS users are going to *hate*, you should at least have SOME numbers showing the efficacy of your idea, or a link to such numbers.

    Because otherwise, you’re kind of trying to use your own sense of grandeur to get your way, and that’s a bit, oh, I don’t know, egotisitical?

  136. John: then do both.

    Robert, are you paying for that bandwidth? No, you aren’t. But you are using it. Can you show me any data that shows RSS feed ads have a positive return greater than the cost of the bandwidth used? I mean, you’re advocating something that most of the RSS users are going to *hate*, you should at least have SOME numbers showing the efficacy of your idea, or a link to such numbers.

    Because otherwise, you’re kind of trying to use your own sense of grandeur to get your way, and that’s a bit, oh, I don’t know, egotisitical?

  137. Hey Robert,
    While you’ve got this, uh, unharnessed energy thing going on right now, why don’t you direct it over to the xbox team to find out what the hell ever happened to Risk on the Xbox?

    Someone should swing for dropping that ball. Seriously.

  138. Hey Robert,
    While you’ve got this, uh, unharnessed energy thing going on right now, why don’t you direct it over to the xbox team to find out what the hell ever happened to Risk on the Xbox?

    Someone should swing for dropping that ball. Seriously.

  139. Hey Robert,
    While you’ve got this, uh, unharnessed energy thing going on right now, why don’t you direct it over to the xbox team to find out what the hell ever happened to Risk on the Xbox?

    Someone should swing for dropping that ball. Seriously.

  140. Just to add that, from a publisher standpoint, the biggest argument for partial text feeds is that it drastically reduces the odds that someone’ll steal your content.

    And, considering that the feed theft industry is set to become a 1B$ one this year, that’s a pretty big motivation.

  141. Just to add that, from a publisher standpoint, the biggest argument for partial text feeds is that it drastically reduces the odds that someone’ll steal your content.

    And, considering that the feed theft industry is set to become a 1B$ one this year, that’s a pretty big motivation.

  142. Just to add that, from a publisher standpoint, the biggest argument for partial text feeds is that it drastically reduces the odds that someone’ll steal your content.

    And, considering that the feed theft industry is set to become a 1B$ one this year, that’s a pretty big motivation.

  143. Scoble, when I subscribe to your feeds on live.com, I see only partial extracts of your blog posts. This is different from what I see for engadget.com and autoblog.com.

  144. Scoble, when I subscribe to your feeds on live.com, I see only partial extracts of your blog posts. This is different from what I see for engadget.com and autoblog.com.

  145. Scoble, when I subscribe to your feeds on live.com, I see only partial extracts of your blog posts. This is different from what I see for engadget.com and autoblog.com.

  146. Microsoft treating users as slaves:

    http://www.computerworld.com/blogs/node/1345

    “Why not simply open the standard? Because it would mean Microsoft would lose control of a vital part of their revenue stream – sales of Office. Instead, by proposing the standard to the ISO they give the appearance of being open and honest, while actually retaining the control they currently enjoy.”

  147. Microsoft treating users as slaves:

    http://www.computerworld.com/blogs/node/1345

    “Why not simply open the standard? Because it would mean Microsoft would lose control of a vital part of their revenue stream – sales of Office. Instead, by proposing the standard to the ISO they give the appearance of being open and honest, while actually retaining the control they currently enjoy.”

  148. Microsoft treating users as slaves:

    http://www.computerworld.com/blogs/node/1345

    “Why not simply open the standard? Because it would mean Microsoft would lose control of a vital part of their revenue stream – sales of Office. Instead, by proposing the standard to the ISO they give the appearance of being open and honest, while actually retaining the control they currently enjoy.”

  149. macbeach: that article has the facts all wrong. Why don’t you look into what the licensing of the new Office formats are? If you did you’d be doing more work than this “journalist.”

    dmad: tell me how you’ll make money with advertising if you have no readers? I’d love to know that one!!

  150. macbeach: that article has the facts all wrong. Why don’t you look into what the licensing of the new Office formats are? If you did you’d be doing more work than this “journalist.”

    dmad: tell me how you’ll make money with advertising if you have no readers? I’d love to know that one!!

  151. macbeach: that article has the facts all wrong. Why don’t you look into what the licensing of the new Office formats are? If you did you’d be doing more work than this “journalist.”

    dmad: tell me how you’ll make money with advertising if you have no readers? I’d love to know that one!!

  152. Full or partial feeds: Scoble is shooting

    For those who want more ammunition for both partial or full feeds, you can read Robert Scoble’s posting and the great discussion yesterday. After the question on MarketingFacts, my answer on this and me skipping partial feeds, it is good to read what …

  153. The solution to content theft is not partials feeds. It will only take them some time to take a feed and fetch the according content from a website.

    If there is a solution, it is more old school approaches like combined efforts as in hurting where the money comes from.

    As in full feeds: if your business modell requires partial feeds and your readers want full feeds, then at least be honest and say you are in there for the money, skip the feed at all and make standard SEO – because that is then what you are after: Visits from the search engines, not blog readers who have different interests than SE-visitors.

  154. The solution to content theft is not partials feeds. It will only take them some time to take a feed and fetch the according content from a website.

    If there is a solution, it is more old school approaches like combined efforts as in hurting where the money comes from.

    As in full feeds: if your business modell requires partial feeds and your readers want full feeds, then at least be honest and say you are in there for the money, skip the feed at all and make standard SEO – because that is then what you are after: Visits from the search engines, not blog readers who have different interests than SE-visitors.

  155. The solution to content theft is not partials feeds. It will only take them some time to take a feed and fetch the according content from a website.

    If there is a solution, it is more old school approaches like combined efforts as in hurting where the money comes from.

    As in full feeds: if your business modell requires partial feeds and your readers want full feeds, then at least be honest and say you are in there for the money, skip the feed at all and make standard SEO – because that is then what you are after: Visits from the search engines, not blog readers who have different interests than SE-visitors.

  156. THis came up the other month and I commented on partial evrsus full text then. My contention? The decision to provide full or partial feeds is entirely dependant on what I’m using RSS for, and who my intended audience is. My commercial games news website only publishes a partial feed – deliberately – as I don’t want people reading the stories, reviews, articles and other things I publish through that channel via RSS. The RSS feed (which has been available since we launched in 2002) is designed specifically to draw people to the website itself, to introduce them not to the one story theya re reading, but to the wealth of other information contained on the site that is not made available via RSS (even via a partial feed).

    At the same time, my personal weblog where I talk about Identity and other things is availabel as a full-text feed (with RSS ads, if they’re working properly…) because it is a discussion site, a ‘blog’, not a commercial concern.

    More here:
    http://cro.alienpants.com/index.php/2005/11/28/rss-feeds-full-text-or-partial-text/

  157. THis came up the other month and I commented on partial evrsus full text then. My contention? The decision to provide full or partial feeds is entirely dependant on what I’m using RSS for, and who my intended audience is. My commercial games news website only publishes a partial feed – deliberately – as I don’t want people reading the stories, reviews, articles and other things I publish through that channel via RSS. The RSS feed (which has been available since we launched in 2002) is designed specifically to draw people to the website itself, to introduce them not to the one story theya re reading, but to the wealth of other information contained on the site that is not made available via RSS (even via a partial feed).

    At the same time, my personal weblog where I talk about Identity and other things is availabel as a full-text feed (with RSS ads, if they’re working properly…) because it is a discussion site, a ‘blog’, not a commercial concern.

    More here:
    http://cro.alienpants.com/index.php/2005/11/28/rss-feeds-full-text-or-partial-text/

  158. THis came up the other month and I commented on partial evrsus full text then. My contention? The decision to provide full or partial feeds is entirely dependant on what I’m using RSS for, and who my intended audience is. My commercial games news website only publishes a partial feed – deliberately – as I don’t want people reading the stories, reviews, articles and other things I publish through that channel via RSS. The RSS feed (which has been available since we launched in 2002) is designed specifically to draw people to the website itself, to introduce them not to the one story theya re reading, but to the wealth of other information contained on the site that is not made available via RSS (even via a partial feed).

    At the same time, my personal weblog where I talk about Identity and other things is availabel as a full-text feed (with RSS ads, if they’re working properly…) because it is a discussion site, a ‘blog’, not a commercial concern.

    More here:
    http://cro.alienpants.com/index.php/2005/11/28/rss-feeds-full-text-or-partial-text/

  159. RSS Feeds – Full Text or Partial Text?

    There’s a debate raging on the use of RSS – either full-text or partial-text feeds. I’m going to talk about my games news website news0r.com, and compare it to this site, my personal weblog.
    On news0r, there is a partial RSS feed of the l…

  160. Alexa affects ya (and you’ll believe a backhoe can fly)

    In today’s IT Blogwatch, we look at the uncritical, breathless buzz generated by Amazon’s Alexa web search "platform." Not to mention Nizlopi and his unexpected contender for the UK’s Christmas #1 single…
    Is the Alexa news ground breakin…

  161. Some people just don’t get the technology. Give ‘em Hell. A lot of places still have trouble understanding the real power and appeal of the internet.

  162. Some people just don’t get the technology. Give ‘em Hell. A lot of places still have trouble understanding the real power and appeal of the internet.

  163. Some people just don’t get the technology. Give ‘em Hell. A lot of places still have trouble understanding the real power and appeal of the internet.

  164. I think the the this points out is the difference between power users like scoble and more casual users. Of course partial text feeds are gonna stand out in 700 feeds.

    But I’d imagine that most folks aren’t using RSS like Scoble does. As a matter of fact I’d imagine most folks use them not all that differently than they use their favorites.

  165. I think the the this points out is the difference between power users like scoble and more casual users. Of course partial text feeds are gonna stand out in 700 feeds.

    But I’d imagine that most folks aren’t using RSS like Scoble does. As a matter of fact I’d imagine most folks use them not all that differently than they use their favorites.

  166. I think the the this points out is the difference between power users like scoble and more casual users. Of course partial text feeds are gonna stand out in 700 feeds.

    But I’d imagine that most folks aren’t using RSS like Scoble does. As a matter of fact I’d imagine most folks use them not all that differently than they use their favorites.

  167. There is a semi-prolific blogger that works a couple of cubes down the aisle from me. Believe it or not, he only feed the TITLES of his articles! I gently told him once that I wasn’t getting much out of his blog that way.

    So now he has to walk down the aisle and tell me when he’s posted a “good” article. Justice is served!

  168. There is a semi-prolific blogger that works a couple of cubes down the aisle from me. Believe it or not, he only feed the TITLES of his articles! I gently told him once that I wasn’t getting much out of his blog that way.

    So now he has to walk down the aisle and tell me when he’s posted a “good” article. Justice is served!

  169. There is a semi-prolific blogger that works a couple of cubes down the aisle from me. Believe it or not, he only feed the TITLES of his articles! I gently told him once that I wasn’t getting much out of his blog that way.

    So now he has to walk down the aisle and tell me when he’s posted a “good” article. Justice is served!

  170. Your posts tend to run to ten or fifteen lines or so. Posting a full feed makes sense. Some other blogs (I won’t mention Autoblog by name) run to pages of text per posting, and sometimes a dozen or more photos. I don’t want all that in my RSS reader. I find it convenient if a feed has a few lines of detail, and lets me decide if I want to go find out more.

    In the days of paper journalism, you had to write your articles from the top down, because the editor might cut you off when you exceeded the column inches he had available. Something for blogs to consider.

  171. Your posts tend to run to ten or fifteen lines or so. Posting a full feed makes sense. Some other blogs (I won’t mention Autoblog by name) run to pages of text per posting, and sometimes a dozen or more photos. I don’t want all that in my RSS reader. I find it convenient if a feed has a few lines of detail, and lets me decide if I want to go find out more.

    In the days of paper journalism, you had to write your articles from the top down, because the editor might cut you off when you exceeded the column inches he had available. Something for blogs to consider.

  172. Your posts tend to run to ten or fifteen lines or so. Posting a full feed makes sense. Some other blogs (I won’t mention Autoblog by name) run to pages of text per posting, and sometimes a dozen or more photos. I don’t want all that in my RSS reader. I find it convenient if a feed has a few lines of detail, and lets me decide if I want to go find out more.

    In the days of paper journalism, you had to write your articles from the top down, because the editor might cut you off when you exceeded the column inches he had available. Something for blogs to consider.

  173. I won’t pretend to understand a damned thing about RSS but I do admit if anyone needed full text of the crap I post they’d probably need therapy more…

  174. I won’t pretend to understand a damned thing about RSS but I do admit if anyone needed full text of the crap I post they’d probably need therapy more…

  175. I won’t pretend to understand a damned thing about RSS but I do admit if anyone needed full text of the crap I post they’d probably need therapy more…

  176. I think the reality is that each company can think and act the way they want. I tend to agree with summary instead of full content in feeds for content generators such as blogs or enthusiast sites. Have you seem how many scrapper sites making money of our content there is around? They simply paste the whole feed.

    Now, you saying a company will not get a link from a page you control just because they don’t provide full feeds… Sorry but I am now removing YOUR feed from my list.

  177. I think the reality is that each company can think and act the way they want. I tend to agree with summary instead of full content in feeds for content generators such as blogs or enthusiast sites. Have you seem how many scrapper sites making money of our content there is around? They simply paste the whole feed.

    Now, you saying a company will not get a link from a page you control just because they don’t provide full feeds… Sorry but I am now removing YOUR feed from my list.

  178. I think the reality is that each company can think and act the way they want. I tend to agree with summary instead of full content in feeds for content generators such as blogs or enthusiast sites. Have you seem how many scrapper sites making money of our content there is around? They simply paste the whole feed.

    Now, you saying a company will not get a link from a page you control just because they don’t provide full feeds… Sorry but I am now removing YOUR feed from my list.

  179. “What the mainstream media (MSM) lacks, the blogosphere has in spades: energy, momentum, and a growing audience. But what bloggers lack is money — bloggers have yet to find an efficient way to turn their hard work into revenue … and until they do, blogging will always be a lonely sidelight, vulnerable to dying with the next missed mortgage check.”

    Michael S. Malone

    Isn’t leaving your slavishly derived CGM a fair trade for the attention that your site derives from the other zombie like readers deciding that your comments merit further investigation?

  180. “What the mainstream media (MSM) lacks, the blogosphere has in spades: energy, momentum, and a growing audience. But what bloggers lack is money — bloggers have yet to find an efficient way to turn their hard work into revenue … and until they do, blogging will always be a lonely sidelight, vulnerable to dying with the next missed mortgage check.”

    Michael S. Malone

    Isn’t leaving your slavishly derived CGM a fair trade for the attention that your site derives from the other zombie like readers deciding that your comments merit further investigation?

  181. “What the mainstream media (MSM) lacks, the blogosphere has in spades: energy, momentum, and a growing audience. But what bloggers lack is money — bloggers have yet to find an efficient way to turn their hard work into revenue … and until they do, blogging will always be a lonely sidelight, vulnerable to dying with the next missed mortgage check.”

    Michael S. Malone

    Isn’t leaving your slavishly derived CGM a fair trade for the attention that your site derives from the other zombie like readers deciding that your comments merit further investigation?

  182. Wasn’t the whole intention of an RSS feed in the frist place to provide a summary so you could decide wether or not you wanted to load the site to read what was written?

  183. Wasn’t the whole intention of an RSS feed in the frist place to provide a summary so you could decide wether or not you wanted to load the site to read what was written?

  184. Wasn’t the whole intention of an RSS feed in the frist place to provide a summary so you could decide wether or not you wanted to load the site to read what was written?

  185. OK, I’ll say it, since I didn’t see this go by in the comment thread:

    I thought you weren’t reading feeds anymore…? Something something no time something skimming something Memeorandum something?

    What changed?

    (On a side note, I principally offer full-text feeds at TVT, and you managed – historically – to subscribe to the sole partial-text feed. Something upthread about “how hard is it to offer both?” Not hard at all.)

  186. OK, I’ll say it, since I didn’t see this go by in the comment thread:

    I thought you weren’t reading feeds anymore…? Something something no time something skimming something Memeorandum something?

    What changed?

    (On a side note, I principally offer full-text feeds at TVT, and you managed – historically – to subscribe to the sole partial-text feed. Something upthread about “how hard is it to offer both?” Not hard at all.)

  187. OK, I’ll say it, since I didn’t see this go by in the comment thread:

    I thought you weren’t reading feeds anymore…? Something something no time something skimming something Memeorandum something?

    What changed?

    (On a side note, I principally offer full-text feeds at TVT, and you managed – historically – to subscribe to the sole partial-text feed. Something upthread about “how hard is it to offer both?” Not hard at all.)

  188. Doug (91): NOOOOOO!!! That absolutely is NOT the reason feeds were invented. Talk to Netscape and Dave Winer about what they were used for. Syndication!!!! IE, redistributing content to where YOU wanted it.

    Ethan: I started reading my feeds again cause I realized I was missing the small things.

  189. Doug (91): NOOOOOO!!! That absolutely is NOT the reason feeds were invented. Talk to Netscape and Dave Winer about what they were used for. Syndication!!!! IE, redistributing content to where YOU wanted it.

    Ethan: I started reading my feeds again cause I realized I was missing the small things.

  190. Doug (91): NOOOOOO!!! That absolutely is NOT the reason feeds were invented. Talk to Netscape and Dave Winer about what they were used for. Syndication!!!! IE, redistributing content to where YOU wanted it.

    Ethan: I started reading my feeds again cause I realized I was missing the small things.

  191. scobelizer, I beg to differ that IS what RSS feeds were originally intended for.

    According to rss-specifications.com the very name in its self is its definition:

    “RSS is defined as Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary. RSS files are formed as XML files and are designed to provide content summaries of news, blogs, forums or website content.”

    “The feeds are generally simple headlines and brief descriptions if the user is interested they can click to see additional information.”

    “Initially rss feeds were intended for news headlines.”

  192. scobelizer, I beg to differ that IS what RSS feeds were originally intended for.

    According to rss-specifications.com the very name in its self is its definition:

    “RSS is defined as Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary. RSS files are formed as XML files and are designed to provide content summaries of news, blogs, forums or website content.”

    “The feeds are generally simple headlines and brief descriptions if the user is interested they can click to see additional information.”

    “Initially rss feeds were intended for news headlines.”

  193. scobelizer, I beg to differ that IS what RSS feeds were originally intended for.

    According to rss-specifications.com the very name in its self is its definition:

    “RSS is defined as Really Simple Syndication or Rich Site Summary. RSS files are formed as XML files and are designed to provide content summaries of news, blogs, forums or website content.”

    “The feeds are generally simple headlines and brief descriptions if the user is interested they can click to see additional information.”

    “Initially rss feeds were intended for news headlines.”

  194. One aspect that doesn’t seem to have been discussed is what Feed Readers are designed/used for. My understanding was that this was the latest way of getting information from various sources without having the overhead of downloading styling, visiting multiple sites etc. It is for the information hungry consumer.

    Personally excerpted feeds come across as teaser ads, not content – this is not what RSS/Feed Readers was designed for.

    FWIW I don’t think the small click through revenues warrant forcing people to visit the site in order to read unless the site has a huge readership. For most publishers I believe that your RSS publishing is better seen as developing a recognition of your expertise within your given industry. It’s more of a marketing tool than a revenue stream.

  195. One aspect that doesn’t seem to have been discussed is what Feed Readers are designed/used for. My understanding was that this was the latest way of getting information from various sources without having the overhead of downloading styling, visiting multiple sites etc. It is for the information hungry consumer.

    Personally excerpted feeds come across as teaser ads, not content – this is not what RSS/Feed Readers was designed for.

    FWIW I don’t think the small click through revenues warrant forcing people to visit the site in order to read unless the site has a huge readership. For most publishers I believe that your RSS publishing is better seen as developing a recognition of your expertise within your given industry. It’s more of a marketing tool than a revenue stream.

  196. One aspect that doesn’t seem to have been discussed is what Feed Readers are designed/used for. My understanding was that this was the latest way of getting information from various sources without having the overhead of downloading styling, visiting multiple sites etc. It is for the information hungry consumer.

    Personally excerpted feeds come across as teaser ads, not content – this is not what RSS/Feed Readers was designed for.

    FWIW I don’t think the small click through revenues warrant forcing people to visit the site in order to read unless the site has a huge readership. For most publishers I believe that your RSS publishing is better seen as developing a recognition of your expertise within your given industry. It’s more of a marketing tool than a revenue stream.

  197. [...] And ads in RSS bug me, big-time. If I see those in a feed, I just unsubscribe. I might still wander over to the site from time-to time, if I think of it. If you want me to come to your blog (to see your ads), then just use excerpts in the feed. Useful excerpts, not just headlines and one line of text. I’ll go over to the blog if I think the post is interesting enough (unless it’s a billblog, or bullblog). Robert Scoble, Microsoft’s premier blogger, doesn’t like less than full posts in feeds. I don’t, either. But I’d rather have that than ads. [...]

  198. [...] I’d suggest bloggers all start by stating their terms and conditions of copyright re-use. How much content can be republished (eg: three paragraphs/1000 words/partial-RSS feed only) and under what terms and conditions that can occur (eg: proper attribution and link). And then I’d love to see some of the big media companies start dropping lawsuits on serial plagiarists. The content community needs a big stick of some variety or they will be powerless to enforce copyright. I’d love to see a global organisation that any content provider can become a member of which would be charged with enforcing copyright through the legal system. The software industry has one, so does the music industry. Also, the blogosphere needs to get over it’s reticence for partial-RSS feeds. Let’s face it, if you publish a full RSS feed, you’re inviting people to rip off your content. Om Malik’s blog couldn’t have been ripped off as easily as it could were it not for the full RSS feed he offers. Robert Scoble last month wanted to “shoot someone” because they refused to publish full RSS feeds, reasoning that they were treating him like a “slave”. The subsequent discussion is well worth reading. I really don’t see how you can expect to run a commercial blog, if you value your content so little, that provide a mechanism for anyone to publish it, wherever the hell they want. [...]

  199. What about membership based sites, where the full text of the article is for members only, and requires login at the main site?

    The teaser text or partial text is simply to let members, and ysers (prospects) know that new content has been posted. The partial of course includes details as to the gist of the full text.

    Partial feeds make sense to me in this sense. Am I wrong?

  200. What about membership based sites, where the full text of the article is for members only, and requires login at the main site?

    The teaser text or partial text is simply to let members, and ysers (prospects) know that new content has been posted. The partial of course includes details as to the gist of the full text.

    Partial feeds make sense to me in this sense. Am I wrong?

  201. Kevin: I guess but the number of sites that I’m willing to be a member of to read the content is very very very very small. Are you the New York Times? That’s about it.

  202. Kevin: I guess but the number of sites that I’m willing to be a member of to read the content is very very very very small. Are you the New York Times? That’s about it.

  203. I am not the Are you the New York Times… but I am responsible for getting as many members of the company I work for (trade association), which has approx 6000 members, to come back to our web site. I think partial feeds are just fine in this regard. Perhaps such feeds are even a “member benefit”. Am I misguided?

  204. I am not the Are you the New York Times… but I am responsible for getting as many members of the company I work for (trade association), which has approx 6000 members, to come back to our web site. I think partial feeds are just fine in this regard. Perhaps such feeds are even a “member benefit”. Am I misguided?