Bloggers wish list

Toby Bloomberg over on theĀ Diva marketing blog has a wish list from a bunch of bloggers about what they’d like to see in 2006 on blogs.

Me?

I’d like to see good information make a comeback. Reviews anyone? DPreview.com has awesome ones on cameras. What if we had a review site like that for software?

And, where’s Christopher Brumme? His 11,000-word posts used to have the developers swooning like mad everytime he posted. It’d be great to see people actually sharing more of what they know in 2006. Yeah, I wish I was better on both of these counts.

Here’s a good example: Clemens Vasters has a lengthy series of posts on teaching Indigo to do REST/POX. Clemens is the author of Das Blog, the blogging tool my boss uses (and loves). His knowledge impressed someone, cause he’s joining Microsoft in February.

Comments

  1. I’d love it if Chris Brumme started blogging again. I still have his feed in sharpreader just incase, though it’s only read once a day now.

  2. I’d love it if Chris Brumme started blogging again. I still have his feed in sharpreader just incase, though it’s only read once a day now.

  3. On that note you should really check out Vlad Mazek’s blog at http://www.vladville.com – he is a small business guy that has one of the most popular blogs dealing with Microsoft SBS and people going into technology. He also runs a huge SBS Show podcast which has weekly experts talking about IT and small business consulting. Probably one of the most respected guys at least on the SBS / IT Pro side.

    Mark

  4. On that note you should really check out Vlad Mazek’s blog at http://www.vladville.com – he is a small business guy that has one of the most popular blogs dealing with Microsoft SBS and people going into technology. He also runs a huge SBS Show podcast which has weekly experts talking about IT and small business consulting. Probably one of the most respected guys at least on the SBS / IT Pro side.

    Mark

  5. good information make a comeback

    Then it wouldn’t be a blog. :) The blog networks are good (great in fact) for quickie fast news (ie. Nick and Jason networks) but royally suck for in-depth expert-level discussionals.

    Good info costs LOTS of money, good journalism becomes a biz, not a blog. They can use a ‘blog’ maybe, but the Message (the good info) is not the Medium. And reverse chron and most hacked-up poor performaing blog companies, just don’t meet the expanding Enterprise-level demands of a real biz CRM. Just look at how Six Apart is wholesale falling apart, as they try an creep into corporate waters. These grassroots burps, need real gritted steel and iron, to jump into the real world.

  6. good information make a comeback

    Then it wouldn’t be a blog. :) The blog networks are good (great in fact) for quickie fast news (ie. Nick and Jason networks) but royally suck for in-depth expert-level discussionals.

    Good info costs LOTS of money, good journalism becomes a biz, not a blog. They can use a ‘blog’ maybe, but the Message (the good info) is not the Medium. And reverse chron and most hacked-up poor performaing blog companies, just don’t meet the expanding Enterprise-level demands of a real biz CRM. Just look at how Six Apart is wholesale falling apart, as they try an creep into corporate waters. These grassroots burps, need real gritted steel and iron, to jump into the real world.

  7. I’ve found that an independent technical/software review blog doesn’t achieve much popularity (i.e., site ranking). A substantial effort is required to test a complex Web-based application, such as Google Base, Squidoo, or Amazon Connect, document/illustrate the results, and (where practical) enable readers to duplicate the tests with customized links.

    Unless you have a commercial interest in the blog’s technical topics or software reviews, the effort you expend is unlikely to be repaid — either by ad clicks or the personal satisfaction from reader comments and trackbacks.

    –rj

  8. I’ve found that an independent technical/software review blog doesn’t achieve much popularity (i.e., site ranking). A substantial effort is required to test a complex Web-based application, such as Google Base, Squidoo, or Amazon Connect, document/illustrate the results, and (where practical) enable readers to duplicate the tests with customized links.

    Unless you have a commercial interest in the blog’s technical topics or software reviews, the effort you expend is unlikely to be repaid — either by ad clicks or the personal satisfaction from reader comments and trackbacks.

    –rj