Back to my passions

Hey, Guy, how come you haven’t invited me over for breakfast? I thought you were my friend! :-)

Seriously, though, if you’re a company or a blogger and want a link, you don’t need to suck up. Just go to my comment and post your freaking URL along with a pitch of why your blog, software, new idea, etc rocks. But more on that in a bit.

Anyway, this weekend was really incredible. Our party was just over the top.

I find myself asking “now what?”

I’m asking myself what’ll get me excited to get out of bed tomorrow. Thanks to Rick Segal for putting that question in my head (he took Patrick and I out for sushi and we spent a bit of time talking life and technology).
Passion. It’s coming up in lots of conversations.

Today I had lunch with the team from Ether.com. I’m not allowed to say what they showed me, but I saw the fire in their eyes (that’s program manager Ron Hirson on left, and developer and co-founder Scott Faber on right). The passion for building something that changes the world. If you’re someone who sells your time and want a new way to do that (like, say, a lawyer does) then you should sign up for their beta.

I love that passion! It’s why I love hanging out with geeks. People who build things. People who put it all on the line. Who risk everything for an idea.

We need more people like that. Enough talking about me. Who’s the geek sitting tonight in a dark room typing code into a keyboard and hitting F5 to see how much further they’ve gotten in their dreams?

But, back to the Guy Kawasaki post: why suck up to anyone? If you are good, people will notice. They’ll stand in line overnight to buy your product. Word will get around. All you need is a few people to kick it off (and they don’t need to be the A list either).

I get bummed out when I hear people assume that getting me (or other A listers, or even someone who really has huge influence like Walt Mossberg or Steven Levy) to write about them will make their company.

Here’s a little secret: want to get me passionate about something? Get every single person in my life passionate about it.

Why did I return my Cingular aircard and buy a Verizon EVDO one? Cause my friends were passionate. My readers were passionate. And they were right. At Oakland my Cingular card would barely work. Verizon has five bars here and is fast, fast, fast.
Why did I try CoComment? It’s not cause Laurent took me skiing. Well, that helped. But I started hearing about CoComment from other people at the LIFT conference. Laurent didn’t come to the “A list” first. He just was passing them out to anyone. Passion. It’s not about sucking up.

It’s about being so excited by what you’ve built that you’ll tell anyone. Remember Flickr? Two years ago Stewart Butterfield was so excited that he was just pulling anyone who would listen aside at the O’Reilly Emerging Technology conference and showing them his stuff. That passion won me over as a customer and continues winning me over to this day. (Although he better watch out, cause Albert Lai of Bubbleshare is even more passionate than Stewart was!).

So, don’t suck up, get excited!

PS: are you excited about something you’ve built? Just post it here. Don’t send me email. If you send me email your excitement might get lost in my inbox. 133 emails to go.

99 thoughts on “Back to my passions

  1. Well, since everyone is getting a plug, might as well put in mine. I’m a silicon valley guy who loves porn (hey, I’m sure I’m not alone here) and know search engines. So, I’ve put the two together and built the largest adult search engine in the world.

    http://www.eonsex.com

  2. Well, since everyone is getting a plug, might as well put in mine. I’m a silicon valley guy who loves porn (hey, I’m sure I’m not alone here) and know search engines. So, I’ve put the two together and built the largest adult search engine in the world.

    http://www.eonsex.com

  3. Taking a break from the Apple debate, a SaaS that I’m excited about is FeedBlitz http://www.feedblitz.com – an email service that delivers blogs via mail to readers and subscriber management / customization for publishers – in other words, it makes a blog into an easy to manage newsletter. Zero to over 300k readers in its first few months of operations, it supports OPML subscriptions, metrics integration with FeedBurner, and offers upgrade services for email customization.

    Users publishing their blogs using FeedBlitz include at lest one of those mentioned above – Guy Kawasaki. It’s recently been extended to allow anyone to search the subscriber web formed by all the subscriptions at feedadvisor.com

  4. Taking a break from the Apple debate, a SaaS that I’m excited about is FeedBlitz http://www.feedblitz.com – an email service that delivers blogs via mail to readers and subscriber management / customization for publishers – in other words, it makes a blog into an easy to manage newsletter. Zero to over 300k readers in its first few months of operations, it supports OPML subscriptions, metrics integration with FeedBurner, and offers upgrade services for email customization.

    Users publishing their blogs using FeedBlitz include at lest one of those mentioned above – Guy Kawasaki. It’s recently been extended to allow anyone to search the subscriber web formed by all the subscriptions at feedadvisor.com

  5. Actually Jack, up until the mid 90s, Apple was never going to be approved over IBM in corporate. IBM had that kind of corporate clout, Apple never did. Ever. Still doesn’t.

    As well, IBM never encouraged clone makers. In fact, they sued the *hell* out of them. It wasn’t until Phoenix pulled off a clean version of the PC BIOS that the clone market could start up, and had they lost that suit, IBM would have been *fine* with it.

    But either way, your licensing point falls down. Early on, there was no PC hardware that could have run the Mac OS worth a crap, so they would have had to license not just the OS, but the hardware spec as well, which is exactly what they did in the 90s, and that was a rather amazing failure. There’s yet to be any logic to suggest that Apple would have somehow been this industry – dominating powerhouse if they had licensed the Mac out early on. In fact, they were NEVER an industry dominating powerhouse on say, an IBM scale or a Microsoft scale. They’ve always been a major player, bigger or smaller depending on when you’re talking, but they’ve never had a Microsoftian market share.

    The problem with sales was who was going to buy it? Corporate didn’t want it, and refused to buy it, and schools, especially at K-12 take forever to buy anything, and you have to deeply discount to get those sales. So they were left with Higher Ed and niche markets. Developing for the Mac was a complete pain in the ass, as the development machines cost a LOT more than the Mac did.

    The sales point was valid, but any attempt to link it to some “If they had only licensed the OS…” theory is just silly.

  6. Actually Jack, up until the mid 90s, Apple was never going to be approved over IBM in corporate. IBM had that kind of corporate clout, Apple never did. Ever. Still doesn’t.

    As well, IBM never encouraged clone makers. In fact, they sued the *hell* out of them. It wasn’t until Phoenix pulled off a clean version of the PC BIOS that the clone market could start up, and had they lost that suit, IBM would have been *fine* with it.

    But either way, your licensing point falls down. Early on, there was no PC hardware that could have run the Mac OS worth a crap, so they would have had to license not just the OS, but the hardware spec as well, which is exactly what they did in the 90s, and that was a rather amazing failure. There’s yet to be any logic to suggest that Apple would have somehow been this industry – dominating powerhouse if they had licensed the Mac out early on. In fact, they were NEVER an industry dominating powerhouse on say, an IBM scale or a Microsoft scale. They’ve always been a major player, bigger or smaller depending on when you’re talking, but they’ve never had a Microsoftian market share.

    The problem with sales was who was going to buy it? Corporate didn’t want it, and refused to buy it, and schools, especially at K-12 take forever to buy anything, and you have to deeply discount to get those sales. So they were left with Higher Ed and niche markets. Developing for the Mac was a complete pain in the ass, as the development machines cost a LOT more than the Mac did.

    The sales point was valid, but any attempt to link it to some “If they had only licensed the OS…” theory is just silly.

  7. John: it’s also about timing. It’s not certain that Apple would have lost if it had licensed early in a growing market and capitalised on its advantages. That’s not the same as licensing too late, when Apple’s market share was falling and the company was being badly run.

    This also doesn’t change the general point I made to Guy: Apple did get noticed; it just wasn’t able to convert notice into sales.

  8. John: it’s also about timing. It’s not certain that Apple would have lost if it had licensed early in a growing market and capitalised on its advantages. That’s not the same as licensing too late, when Apple’s market share was falling and the company was being badly run.

    This also doesn’t change the general point I made to Guy: Apple did get noticed; it just wasn’t able to convert notice into sales.

  9. Jack, what else are you going to license it to?

    Apple tried licensing the hardware in the 90s as well, and discovered, to no one’s surprise, that the cloners went after *apple* instead of extending the market share. Power was particularly blatant.

    The licenses also created a lot of extra work for users and Apple when it came to OS upgrades, because there were too many cases where you needed this patch or that enabler to load it onto a non-Apple system. Not 100%, but there were definite trends and problems.

    in other words, even with Apple detailing the spec for the licensees, there were regular, continual problems, and Apple was having to provide support to the same people who were trying to take away sales. The business model for this was SO stupid, I’m amazed it passed a laugh test.

    That experiment was so obviously and thoroughly bad, and happened at a point when Apple didn’t have any chance whatsoever of gaining at all from it that it never occurred to me that you were talking about THAT idiocy.

    Apple is not, nor has it ever been a software /OS company ala Microsoft. it is a *computer* company, ala IBM, and that has ALWAYS been how they make their money: Selling the whole widget. Every time they’ve forgotten this, it’s been bad.

  10. Jack, what else are you going to license it to?

    Apple tried licensing the hardware in the 90s as well, and discovered, to no one’s surprise, that the cloners went after *apple* instead of extending the market share. Power was particularly blatant.

    The licenses also created a lot of extra work for users and Apple when it came to OS upgrades, because there were too many cases where you needed this patch or that enabler to load it onto a non-Apple system. Not 100%, but there were definite trends and problems.

    in other words, even with Apple detailing the spec for the licensees, there were regular, continual problems, and Apple was having to provide support to the same people who were trying to take away sales. The business model for this was SO stupid, I’m amazed it passed a laugh test.

    That experiment was so obviously and thoroughly bad, and happened at a point when Apple didn’t have any chance whatsoever of gaining at all from it that it never occurred to me that you were talking about THAT idiocy.

    Apple is not, nor has it ever been a software /OS company ala Microsoft. it is a *computer* company, ala IBM, and that has ALWAYS been how they make their money: Selling the whole widget. Every time they’ve forgotten this, it’s been bad.

  11. John C Welch says:

    > The entire “If Apple had licensed the OS in the 80s,
    > they’d own the world” theory is bulldookey.

    > For one, other than a Mac and maybe the Amiga, take a
    > good look at PC state of the art features from 1984
    > on, and tell me at what point did PCs have the
    > graphics hardware to support the Mac OS?

    Nobody said anything about porting Mac OS to the PC, let alone a 1984 PC.

    To put it simply, the dim-witted idea you have spent so much time demolishing is your own dim-witted idea. Sorry.

  12. John C Welch says:

    > The entire “If Apple had licensed the OS in the 80s,
    > they’d own the world” theory is bulldookey.

    > For one, other than a Mac and maybe the Amiga, take a
    > good look at PC state of the art features from 1984
    > on, and tell me at what point did PCs have the
    > graphics hardware to support the Mac OS?

    Nobody said anything about porting Mac OS to the PC, let alone a 1984 PC.

    To put it simply, the dim-witted idea you have spent so much time demolishing is your own dim-witted idea. Sorry.

  13. Guy said…“If you take two companies with equally good products, and one knows how to suck up to bloggers and the other one doesn’t, I believe that the former will win.”

    Well, that really depends on the market demographics, if you fizzle up bloggers, but yet such action alienates key customers, well then you lose. This is very case by case, very demographically CRMish. Say a product with a large blue-collar demographic, suddenly decides to get into the luxury market, they run the risk of losing their base. Sometimes better to peel something off, creating a hybrid, that appeals to differing markets. And sometimes you have highly specialized markets, and all the blog-sucking up won’t do an ounce of good. And the markets are rather thin-slice limited to Consumer and Tech offerings.

    But I liked your ‘suck-up’ post. Bloggers are just a differing subgroup, know the religion(s) and sacred cows, know the lingo, pander to the egos and adjust the marketing. But lot of those things are common sensical, but still good to repeat. The biggest being, how evil marketers are that are only your friends when they have something to push.

    PS – And much more beyond just ‘style’ and ‘viewpoint’, but since I don’t blog, obviously I am not doing anything with the rest of my life, spending all my time “only attacking the thoughts of others” (note that was sarcasm). But I live in this thing called the capitalist system, hence my offerings, scripts and productions need lots of folding green stuff, and I have other family obligations. Your offerings on a blog are already financed. If I could get 100K a year with bonuses, to blog and run shaky cams around Microsoft and go on exotic junkets, maybe I’d change my religion too (though I’d cross my fingers). ;)

    But bearing down on a BIG documentary project and won’t have time to even comment, even in between dupes and encodes, so you will get a breather from me. :) So the comments are safe from snark for awhile.

  14. Guy said…“If you take two companies with equally good products, and one knows how to suck up to bloggers and the other one doesn’t, I believe that the former will win.”

    Well, that really depends on the market demographics, if you fizzle up bloggers, but yet such action alienates key customers, well then you lose. This is very case by case, very demographically CRMish. Say a product with a large blue-collar demographic, suddenly decides to get into the luxury market, they run the risk of losing their base. Sometimes better to peel something off, creating a hybrid, that appeals to differing markets. And sometimes you have highly specialized markets, and all the blog-sucking up won’t do an ounce of good. And the markets are rather thin-slice limited to Consumer and Tech offerings.

    But I liked your ‘suck-up’ post. Bloggers are just a differing subgroup, know the religion(s) and sacred cows, know the lingo, pander to the egos and adjust the marketing. But lot of those things are common sensical, but still good to repeat. The biggest being, how evil marketers are that are only your friends when they have something to push.

    PS – And much more beyond just ‘style’ and ‘viewpoint’, but since I don’t blog, obviously I am not doing anything with the rest of my life, spending all my time “only attacking the thoughts of others” (note that was sarcasm). But I live in this thing called the capitalist system, hence my offerings, scripts and productions need lots of folding green stuff, and I have other family obligations. Your offerings on a blog are already financed. If I could get 100K a year with bonuses, to blog and run shaky cams around Microsoft and go on exotic junkets, maybe I’d change my religion too (though I’d cross my fingers). ;)

    But bearing down on a BIG documentary project and won’t have time to even comment, even in between dupes and encodes, so you will get a breather from me. :) So the comments are safe from snark for awhile.

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  16. I’m a fan of http://www.ning.com though there may be copyright issues. Lashup relatively simple apps but with goodness. Being a British accountant I put together a wee Q&A I called Answering Taxing Questions. It’s a bit scruffy but it took 5 minutes. It’s a start.

  17. I’m a fan of http://www.ning.com though there may be copyright issues. Lashup relatively simple apps but with goodness. Being a British accountant I put together a wee Q&A I called Answering Taxing Questions. It’s a bit scruffy but it took 5 minutes. It’s a start.

  18. The entire “If Apple had licensed the OS in the 80s, they’d own the world” theory is bulldookey.

    For one, other than a Mac and maybe the Amiga, take a good look at PC state of the art features from 1984 on, and tell me at what point did PCs have the graphics hardware to support the Mac OS? pretty much not until VGA, MAYBE EGA. When did the PC world even get to where plug and play expansion slots were standard, no more ISA? Not until recently. When did the PC world stop shipping PS/2 and go to USB – only? Still waiting. How long did it take for ATA to catch up to SCSI, just in terms of partition sizes? I’ve got a dualie 800Mhz G4 at home with a native ATA bus that can only handle 120GB drive/partition sizes, and that machine is not *that* old.

    Face it, IBM and the rest would have had to start making *Macs* for the OS to be licensed.

    Considering how underpowered PCs were in 1984, ESPECIALLY for graphics capabilities, there was.no.way they could have run the Mac OS and had it not be a configuration nightmare that looked like ass.

  19. The entire “If Apple had licensed the OS in the 80s, they’d own the world” theory is bulldookey.

    For one, other than a Mac and maybe the Amiga, take a good look at PC state of the art features from 1984 on, and tell me at what point did PCs have the graphics hardware to support the Mac OS? pretty much not until VGA, MAYBE EGA. When did the PC world even get to where plug and play expansion slots were standard, no more ISA? Not until recently. When did the PC world stop shipping PS/2 and go to USB – only? Still waiting. How long did it take for ATA to catch up to SCSI, just in terms of partition sizes? I’ve got a dualie 800Mhz G4 at home with a native ATA bus that can only handle 120GB drive/partition sizes, and that machine is not *that* old.

    Face it, IBM and the rest would have had to start making *Macs* for the OS to be licensed.

    Considering how underpowered PCs were in 1984, ESPECIALLY for graphics capabilities, there was.no.way they could have run the Mac OS and had it not be a configuration nightmare that looked like ass.

  20. >If you are good, people will notice.

    Guy Kawasaki says:

    > This is where we fundamentally disagree… Apple …
    > had a better mousetrap, we got our (marketshare)
    > clocks cleaned.

    On the contrary, Guy, you DID get noticed, massively. What you failed to do was convert notice into sales. That was mostly because of the decisions you (Apple) took in shipping a system that was overpriced, underpowered and proprietary; refusing to license the OS; insulting prospective customers (shown as drones walking over a cliff) etc etc.

    It wasn’t Microsoft’s fault that Apple took those decisions. Indeed, as you well know, Microsoft recommended a different strategy.

    Still, one thing never changes: man’s tendency to blame somebody else for his own mistakes ;-)

  21. >If you are good, people will notice.

    Guy Kawasaki says:

    > This is where we fundamentally disagree… Apple …
    > had a better mousetrap, we got our (marketshare)
    > clocks cleaned.

    On the contrary, Guy, you DID get noticed, massively. What you failed to do was convert notice into sales. That was mostly because of the decisions you (Apple) took in shipping a system that was overpriced, underpowered and proprietary; refusing to license the OS; insulting prospective customers (shown as drones walking over a cliff) etc etc.

    It wasn’t Microsoft’s fault that Apple took those decisions. Indeed, as you well know, Microsoft recommended a different strategy.

    Still, one thing never changes: man’s tendency to blame somebody else for his own mistakes ;-)

  22. Someone asked for a way to plug your site? You’ve been able to plug your site on pluggit.org for months now… If i get a ton of traffic ill restart the cronjob that cleans links off after a while to keep things fresh.

    Enjoy!

  23. Someone asked for a way to plug your site? You’ve been able to plug your site on pluggit.org for months now… If i get a ton of traffic ill restart the cronjob that cleans links off after a while to keep things fresh.

    Enjoy!

  24. >Microsoft got results (until recently)

    Hmmm, you must have missed the people standing in line overnight to buy our products. So much for accuracy in reporting here.

    What, the Xbox 360? Dude, you’re kidding.

    > It’s not like he’s creating, he’s just writing about those who do.

    For a guy who cares about the journey, you sure seem pretty lose with the facts. I ship a video every single day. That IS creating. What did YOU ship today? Venom. Yes.

    Oh silly Robert, you have no idea what you’re talking about, but okay. No I don’t ship a daily video. I ship a column every other week here:

    http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/columns/appleent/

    I do a column every so often here:

    http://www.mactech.com/

    I do regular bits here:

    http://www.yourmaclife.com/

    I’ve helped write two books on Mac OS X This one in 2000:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0761524150/sr=8-6/qid=1140524829/ref=sr_1_6/103-6875898-8659826?%5Fencoding=UTF8

    and this one in 2005:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0009IEBV2/sr=8-2/qid=1140524806/ref=sr_1_2/103-6875898-8659826?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance

    I’ve been running sessions at Macworld Conference & Expo since 1999, including one of the first in-depth looks at Mac OS X.

    I’m “the N00b” on http://www.musicalgeeks.com/

    Oh, I helped create a company and a product:

    http://www.tackyshirt.com/ was Sam and my idea, but Sam had the time to put into it more than I did, so I gave him my half, because getting the idea done was important.

    I figured out a way to use AppleScript and Folder actions to allow for automatic scanning of files via Virex without needing kernel extensions, created an implementation of that solution and gave it away:

    http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/18081

    Wrote a wee application that allows me to more easily set my iChat Status, and gave it away:

    http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/22706

    Wrote a script to help automate shutting down a vulnerability in Directory Services, since the manual way was a bit tedious for non-technical users:

    http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/21933

    And wrote some iTunes/Mail, iTunes/Entourage scripts that I gave away, but Mac OS X 10.4 seems to have broken them, and I’ve been lazy.

    Anything else? Care to talk about the companies and products YOU helped to actually create as opposed to just evangelize? In the end, all your work is nothing more than, in essence, comments on other people’s work. Now that’s not a bad thing. You’re good at what you do, and honestly, that’s something. But you’re sloppy, and that’s the bad part. You don’t do your research first, you just throw the spaghetti, and hope some of it sticks. In this case it’s about me, (and you’re wrong, again), but in past instances, you’ve hung coworkers out to dry, and if you hadn’t been pimp-slapped relentlessly here in the comments and on other sites, the chances of you correcting your incorrect assumptions and statements would have most likely approached zero.

    See Robert, unlike you, I don’t have to trumpet my accomplishments 24×7, nor name drop for weeks at a time. You seem to be rather insecure about yourself, but then when your “fame” and a large part of your career is based on self-promotion, well, you don’t really have a choice.

    But don’t confuse me not relentlessly self-promoting myself with me not actually doing anything other than commenting on your blog, because that would be…oh yes, that’s right, that would be incorrect. Again.

    Anything else?

  25. >Microsoft got results (until recently)

    Hmmm, you must have missed the people standing in line overnight to buy our products. So much for accuracy in reporting here.

    What, the Xbox 360? Dude, you’re kidding.

    > It’s not like he’s creating, he’s just writing about those who do.

    For a guy who cares about the journey, you sure seem pretty lose with the facts. I ship a video every single day. That IS creating. What did YOU ship today? Venom. Yes.

    Oh silly Robert, you have no idea what you’re talking about, but okay. No I don’t ship a daily video. I ship a column every other week here:

    http://itmanagement.earthweb.com/columns/appleent/

    I do a column every so often here:

    http://www.mactech.com/

    I do regular bits here:

    http://www.yourmaclife.com/

    I’ve helped write two books on Mac OS X This one in 2000:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0761524150/sr=8-6/qid=1140524829/ref=sr_1_6/103-6875898-8659826?%5Fencoding=UTF8

    and this one in 2005:

    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B0009IEBV2/sr=8-2/qid=1140524806/ref=sr_1_2/103-6875898-8659826?%5Fencoding=UTF8&v=glance

    I’ve been running sessions at Macworld Conference & Expo since 1999, including one of the first in-depth looks at Mac OS X.

    I’m “the N00b” on http://www.musicalgeeks.com/

    Oh, I helped create a company and a product:

    http://www.tackyshirt.com/ was Sam and my idea, but Sam had the time to put into it more than I did, so I gave him my half, because getting the idea done was important.

    I figured out a way to use AppleScript and Folder actions to allow for automatic scanning of files via Virex without needing kernel extensions, created an implementation of that solution and gave it away:

    http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/18081

    Wrote a wee application that allows me to more easily set my iChat Status, and gave it away:

    http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/22706

    Wrote a script to help automate shutting down a vulnerability in Directory Services, since the manual way was a bit tedious for non-technical users:

    http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/21933

    And wrote some iTunes/Mail, iTunes/Entourage scripts that I gave away, but Mac OS X 10.4 seems to have broken them, and I’ve been lazy.

    Anything else? Care to talk about the companies and products YOU helped to actually create as opposed to just evangelize? In the end, all your work is nothing more than, in essence, comments on other people’s work. Now that’s not a bad thing. You’re good at what you do, and honestly, that’s something. But you’re sloppy, and that’s the bad part. You don’t do your research first, you just throw the spaghetti, and hope some of it sticks. In this case it’s about me, (and you’re wrong, again), but in past instances, you’ve hung coworkers out to dry, and if you hadn’t been pimp-slapped relentlessly here in the comments and on other sites, the chances of you correcting your incorrect assumptions and statements would have most likely approached zero.

    See Robert, unlike you, I don’t have to trumpet my accomplishments 24×7, nor name drop for weeks at a time. You seem to be rather insecure about yourself, but then when your “fame” and a large part of your career is based on self-promotion, well, you don’t really have a choice.

    But don’t confuse me not relentlessly self-promoting myself with me not actually doing anything other than commenting on your blog, because that would be…oh yes, that’s right, that would be incorrect. Again.

    Anything else?

  26. >Microsoft got results (until recently)

    Hmmm, you must have missed the people standing in line overnight to buy our products. So much for accuracy in reporting here.

    > It’s not like he’s creating, he’s just writing about those who do.

    For a guy who cares about the journey, you sure seem pretty lose with the facts. I ship a video every single day. That IS creating. What did YOU ship today? Venom. Yes.

  27. >Microsoft got results (until recently)

    Hmmm, you must have missed the people standing in line overnight to buy our products. So much for accuracy in reporting here.

    > It’s not like he’s creating, he’s just writing about those who do.

    For a guy who cares about the journey, you sure seem pretty lose with the facts. I ship a video every single day. That IS creating. What did YOU ship today? Venom. Yes.

  28. >The only differences between him and Chris Coulter are viewpoint and writing style.

    I totally disagree. I regularly put out my own thoughts on things that aren’t prompted by others. Christopher NEVER does that. He only attacks the thoughts of others.

    Guy: great suckup! :-)

    >I worked for Apple, we had a better mousetrap, we got our (marketshare) clocks cleaned.

    I was an Apple evangelist in the same timeperiod. Agreed. But, in hindsight you didn’t have a better mousetrap. Howso? The ecosystem beats the experience. Apple is gonna use that in the iPod market. Just watch.

  29. >The only differences between him and Chris Coulter are viewpoint and writing style.

    I totally disagree. I regularly put out my own thoughts on things that aren’t prompted by others. Christopher NEVER does that. He only attacks the thoughts of others.

    Guy: great suckup! :-)

    >I worked for Apple, we had a better mousetrap, we got our (marketshare) clocks cleaned.

    I was an Apple evangelist in the same timeperiod. Agreed. But, in hindsight you didn’t have a better mousetrap. Howso? The ecosystem beats the experience. Apple is gonna use that in the iPod market. Just watch.

  30. Yeah…. I’d have to say I’m really excited about how TailRank is going. We’re pushign amazingly hard and its awesome to see how people are excited about it and helping out by providing killer feedback.

    Def more exciting than I was when I started Rojo… More exciting than when I worked in the ASF…

  31. Yeah…. I’d have to say I’m really excited about how TailRank is going. We’re pushign amazingly hard and its awesome to see how people are excited about it and helping out by providing killer feedback.

    Def more exciting than I was when I started Rojo… More exciting than when I worked in the ASF…

  32. Hard to do what job? Your Microsoft job? You choose to blog about things other than Microsoft, so I don’t really have much sympathy for you there. Microsoft does email like no other company I know, so that comes with the territory. If you get paid by Microsoft to blog and go to conferences you self-fund and book launches and the like, then I suggest working with your manager to reprioritize some of your other committments if you are finding it difficult to stay focused on the things you are getting paid to do.

  33. Hard to do what job? Your Microsoft job? You choose to blog about things other than Microsoft, so I don’t really have much sympathy for you there. Microsoft does email like no other company I know, so that comes with the territory. If you get paid by Microsoft to blog and go to conferences you self-fund and book launches and the like, then I suggest working with your manager to reprioritize some of your other committments if you are finding it difficult to stay focused on the things you are getting paid to do.

  34. Um, to be accurate, I never implied anything about what Robert should write about, in fact, I don’t care. I get the irrits more at HOW he goes about it. He’s a bit Machiavellian about it, in that so long as it ends up right, the journey’s no biggie, whereas I’m very concerned with the journey, and think that not only does it count as much as the results, it counts MORE than the results.

    Microsoft got results (until recently), but the journey they took was such a scorched-earth campaign that it could be decades to undo the virulent, unrelenting hatred they created. Was it worth it? Well, by Bill’s bank account, sure. But man, it’s got to suck to be doing good work that you know millions will (in some cases literally) spit on just because of the name on the box. Robert kvetched about the DoJ demoralizing the IE team…dude, the DoJ working day and night for the next decade couldn’t do that efficiently as MS itself has. Please note that eating one’s own dogfood, and eating one’s young are in fact, different.

    But the point of my comment was that for Robert to complain about people who never create and only write about those who do is rather hypocritical, since that defines a rather large part of his career and pretty much all of his fame. It’s not like he’s creating, he’s just writing about those who do. The only differences between him and Chris Coulter are viewpoint and writing style.

  35. Um, to be accurate, I never implied anything about what Robert should write about, in fact, I don’t care. I get the irrits more at HOW he goes about it. He’s a bit Machiavellian about it, in that so long as it ends up right, the journey’s no biggie, whereas I’m very concerned with the journey, and think that not only does it count as much as the results, it counts MORE than the results.

    Microsoft got results (until recently), but the journey they took was such a scorched-earth campaign that it could be decades to undo the virulent, unrelenting hatred they created. Was it worth it? Well, by Bill’s bank account, sure. But man, it’s got to suck to be doing good work that you know millions will (in some cases literally) spit on just because of the name on the box. Robert kvetched about the DoJ demoralizing the IE team…dude, the DoJ working day and night for the next decade couldn’t do that efficiently as MS itself has. Please note that eating one’s own dogfood, and eating one’s young are in fact, different.

    But the point of my comment was that for Robert to complain about people who never create and only write about those who do is rather hypocritical, since that defines a rather large part of his career and pretty much all of his fame. It’s not like he’s creating, he’s just writing about those who do. The only differences between him and Chris Coulter are viewpoint and writing style.

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