Top 10 developer blogs

I asked a few days ago for people to give me their favorite developer blogs. Well, one poster led me to this top 10 list and, boy, is it good. Every single blog there is worth subscribing to if you're a developer.

Do you have any tech or coder blogs that are better? Thanks for all the ideas, by the way. I subscribed to a few new blogs.

Comments

  1. I can’t believe you haven’t gotten any more replies
    to that question! Anyway, here are some of the blogs that I try to read regularly. I always find them insightful and I regularly learn about new and interesting tech from them.

    martin fowler – http://martinfowler.com/bliki
    daily wtf – http://thedailywtf.com/
    tim bray – http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/
    joel on software – http://www.joelonsoftware.com/
    jon udell – http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/
    Handbook of Software Architecture – http://www.booch.com/architecture/blog.jsp
    Software Pain and Pleasure – http://codeworrier.blogspot.com/
    IBM developerworks – http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/

    For mobile stuff:
    Russell Beattie’s Notebook – http://www.russellbeattie.com/notebook/

    Java stuff:
    theserverside.com for Java/J2EE stuff – http://www.theserverside.com/tss
    code craft – http://www.journalhome.com/codecraft/
    artima java buzz – http://www.artima.com/buzz/community.jsp?forum=121
    java.net weblogs – http://weblogs.java.net/
    artima design buzz – http://www.artima.com/buzz/community.jsp?forum=124
    cafe au lait – http://www.cafeaulait.org/
    bruce eckel – http://www.artima.com/weblogs/index.jsp?blogger=beckel
    joshua marinacci – http://weblogs.java.net/blog/joshy/

    ruby stuff:
    http://www.pragmatically.net/
    37 signals – http://www.37signals.com/svn/

    I know .NET stuff has already been included but I must add at least these 2 MS bloggers I think the stuff they write cannot be missed :)
    Larry Osterman – http://blogs.msdn.com/larryosterman/default.aspx
    Raymond Chen – http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/default.aspx

    Podcasts to listen to:
    IT Conversations – http://www.itconversations.com/index.html
    Java Posse – http://javaposse.com/
    dotNet rocks – http://www.dotnetrocks.com/
    Channel 9 of course – channel9.msdn.com
    SE radio – http://se-radio.net/

    I should add some more sites like TechCrunch – http://www.techcrunch.com because knowledge of the types of applications that people are building with technology is also important and techcrunch tends to cover a lot of cool new apps.

    I’m sure I missed some good ones, hopefully some other people will post a few.

  2. I can’t believe you haven’t gotten any more replies
    to that question! Anyway, here are some of the blogs that I try to read regularly. I always find them insightful and I regularly learn about new and interesting tech from them.

    martin fowler – http://martinfowler.com/bliki
    daily wtf – http://thedailywtf.com/
    tim bray – http://www.tbray.org/ongoing/
    joel on software – http://www.joelonsoftware.com/
    jon udell – http://weblog.infoworld.com/udell/
    Handbook of Software Architecture – http://www.booch.com/architecture/blog.jsp
    Software Pain and Pleasure – http://codeworrier.blogspot.com/
    IBM developerworks – http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/

    For mobile stuff:
    Russell Beattie’s Notebook – http://www.russellbeattie.com/notebook/

    Java stuff:
    theserverside.com for Java/J2EE stuff – http://www.theserverside.com/tss
    code craft – http://www.journalhome.com/codecraft/
    artima java buzz – http://www.artima.com/buzz/community.jsp?forum=121
    java.net weblogs – http://weblogs.java.net/
    artima design buzz – http://www.artima.com/buzz/community.jsp?forum=124
    cafe au lait – http://www.cafeaulait.org/
    bruce eckel – http://www.artima.com/weblogs/index.jsp?blogger=beckel
    joshua marinacci – http://weblogs.java.net/blog/joshy/

    ruby stuff:
    http://www.pragmatically.net/
    37 signals – http://www.37signals.com/svn/

    I know .NET stuff has already been included but I must add at least these 2 MS bloggers I think the stuff they write cannot be missed :)
    Larry Osterman – http://blogs.msdn.com/larryosterman/default.aspx
    Raymond Chen – http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/default.aspx

    Podcasts to listen to:
    IT Conversations – http://www.itconversations.com/index.html
    Java Posse – http://javaposse.com/
    dotNet rocks – http://www.dotnetrocks.com/
    Channel 9 of course – channel9.msdn.com
    SE radio – http://se-radio.net/

    I should add some more sites like TechCrunch – http://www.techcrunch.com because knowledge of the types of applications that people are building with technology is also important and techcrunch tends to cover a lot of cool new apps.

    I’m sure I missed some good ones, hopefully some other people will post a few.

  3. [...] According to Scoble are a collection of blogs about stone-aged development technology. Java, .NET, C++, that appears to be the limits of his idea of what constitutes “Software Development”. Of course, this is the MS view so I guess that makes sense. The real innovation is in dynamic languages. Squeak Smalltalk with Seaside and Ruby on Rails are a couple of examples of where the real innovation is happening. These people are changing the way software if written. The Smalltalk people don’t have a blog though, they still use mailing lists and a wiki. Then Scoble’s good friend (and mine) Ted Leung is doing his work in Python. Why? Because its more productive than the old fashioned languages Scoble associates with “software development”. For a plain old language geek-fest, I like Lambda the Ultimate. I’m afraid this would be mostly over Scoble’s head though as its mostly oriented towards language theory. [...]

  4. Well to be fair, the list that Scoble linked to does say these are his top 10 FAVORITE blogs. It doesn’t necessarily mean these are the top 10 developer blogs.

    The point of the original meme was intended to get people to list their top 10 favorite blogs “recently”.

    For example, Don Box is one of my favorites, but at the time of the meme, he hadn’t written much in a while. But Jeff Atwood has been on fire, so his was included on my list as a top 10 favorite blog recently. Also, I included Danah Boyd, who is certainly not a .NET blogger, but has written very insightfully on social software.

  5. Well to be fair, the list that Scoble linked to does say these are his top 10 FAVORITE blogs. It doesn’t necessarily mean these are the top 10 developer blogs.

    The point of the original meme was intended to get people to list their top 10 favorite blogs “recently”.

    For example, Don Box is one of my favorites, but at the time of the meme, he hadn’t written much in a while. But Jeff Atwood has been on fire, so his was included on my list as a top 10 favorite blog recently. Also, I included Danah Boyd, who is certainly not a .NET blogger, but has written very insightfully on social software.

  6. Thanks for the link!

    Of course, I’d also recommend my blog:
    http://weblogs.asp.net/jgalloway

    Regarding the Shelley’s comment about Julie Lerman’s blog [ http://www.thedatafarm.com/blog/ ] not being on my list, these are my top 10 out quite a few subscriptions. I subscribe to Julie’s blog as well, but I selected my list based on four criteria:

    1) Signal to noise – Check out Julie’s blog page for today. I see a lot of community info, but nothing that really applies to me. Check out Jason Haley’s page or the Larkware page and there’s tons of stuff you need to know. Julie writes a lot of great stuff, but I don’t always have time to find it amongst the noise. I depend on my “mechanical turks” to find it for me.

    2) Links to other important content – My list is good at finding important content for me. I may not get to go through my entire OPML for a few days, but I’m confident that someone on my list will pass it on if it’s really important.

    3) Very high quality fresh content – These folks read a lot of blogs, so they’re well informed. When they write original content, it’s very informed writing. They’ve got their facts straight, and their original content draws on a huge body of knowledge.

    4) Field testing – I read about this “Top 10 Recent Feeds” meme in September, but didn’t post my list for 3 months. I kept an eye on my OPML, and moved feeds in an out of a “Daily” category based on how useful they were over time. The resulting list were the ones that performed the best for me in about 100 days of testing.

  7. Thanks for the link!

    Of course, I’d also recommend my blog:
    http://weblogs.asp.net/jgalloway

    Regarding the Shelley’s comment about Julie Lerman’s blog [ http://www.thedatafarm.com/blog/ ] not being on my list, these are my top 10 out quite a few subscriptions. I subscribe to Julie’s blog as well, but I selected my list based on four criteria:

    1) Signal to noise – Check out Julie’s blog page for today. I see a lot of community info, but nothing that really applies to me. Check out Jason Haley’s page or the Larkware page and there’s tons of stuff you need to know. Julie writes a lot of great stuff, but I don’t always have time to find it amongst the noise. I depend on my “mechanical turks” to find it for me.

    2) Links to other important content – My list is good at finding important content for me. I may not get to go through my entire OPML for a few days, but I’m confident that someone on my list will pass it on if it’s really important.

    3) Very high quality fresh content – These folks read a lot of blogs, so they’re well informed. When they write original content, it’s very informed writing. They’ve got their facts straight, and their original content draws on a huge body of knowledge.

    4) Field testing – I read about this “Top 10 Recent Feeds” meme in September, but didn’t post my list for 3 months. I kept an eye on my OPML, and moved feeds in an out of a “Daily” category based on how useful they were over time. The resulting list were the ones that performed the best for me in about 100 days of testing.