Would you join a company just cause they let you blog?

Every once in a while someone comes up to me in the hallways or in a cafeteria here and says "I joined Microsoft because of Channel 9 and your blog."

That really used to freak me out because I didn't think that was a logical reason to join a company. But then I started asking them more about why they say that. Most answer one, or both, of two reasons: 1) The company seemed a lot more fun/interesting or less evil to work at after they watched the videos. 2) They wanted to work someplace where you could talk with customers without worrying too much about "the rules."

Anyway, Dennis Howlett looked into this a bit more and I sent him over to our HR/Recruiting department (which has a couple of good bloggers) to see if they had any "numbers." Dennis linked to the answer. I forgot about this one, but last year more than 3,000 resumes came in through our employee blogs just Gretchen's blog. 137 people were hired this way.

Small numbers, yes, but this is a young trend. What will it look like in 10 years?

Separately I hear that Channel 9 is the #1 most referred to thing by college recruits. I'm trying to get actual numbers on that, if you know, please post them. (Last month we passed three million unique visitors for the first time, yowza!)

Sigh, why didn't I remember these numbers when I was at Amazon last week?

On a similar topic, the Wall Street Journal today printed an article about corporate blogging (that link takes you to Jeffrey Treem's blog, the WSJ article isn't on the Net yet) and included Microsoft in it again. Yet another reason for letting your employees blog: better PR.

Comments

  1. Yeah, I’d guess it’s much higher than 137, given the number of posts by PM’s saying they’ve hired someone thanks to a post on their blog.

    To answer your title’s question, no I wouldn’t join a company just because they let me blog. But I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t join a company that *wouldn’t* let me blog.

    Fair enough if it’s in startup phase or something, or put boundaries on the blogging, but it’s such a part of my personality, not letting me blog’d make for a Sad, Sad Jeremy ;-)

  2. Yeah, I’d guess it’s much higher than 137, given the number of posts by PM’s saying they’ve hired someone thanks to a post on their blog.

    To answer your title’s question, no I wouldn’t join a company just because they let me blog. But I’m pretty sure I wouldn’t join a company that *wouldn’t* let me blog.

    Fair enough if it’s in startup phase or something, or put boundaries on the blogging, but it’s such a part of my personality, not letting me blog’d make for a Sad, Sad Jeremy ;-)

  3. I’ll repeat what I said in private email (sort of)…these are the type of metrics ANYONE with half a CXO’s brain should be able to understand. So take those forward and reveal what you can (within the confines of corporate responsibility/SarBox) reveal about the types of metrics companies might like to consider? My sense is this lies at the root of ‘shall we/shan’t’ we discussions?Here’s a starter for 10 – what value reputation? Anyone want to try that out?

  4. I’ll repeat what I said in private email (sort of)…these are the type of metrics ANYONE with half a CXO’s brain should be able to understand. So take those forward and reveal what you can (within the confines of corporate responsibility/SarBox) reveal about the types of metrics companies might like to consider? My sense is this lies at the root of ‘shall we/shan’t’ we discussions?Here’s a starter for 10 – what value reputation? Anyone want to try that out?

  5. better PR? I don’t think so. Why Apple is wildly succesful without having hordes of bloggers as Microsoft has? And don’t you claim that current market position of Microsoft has anything to do with blogging – it was before blogging that it was established. Scoble, I wish sometimes that you could have more consistency…

  6. better PR? I don’t think so. Why Apple is wildly succesful without having hordes of bloggers as Microsoft has? And don’t you claim that current market position of Microsoft has anything to do with blogging – it was before blogging that it was established. Scoble, I wish sometimes that you could have more consistency…

  7. Another question would be do you think you have lost some potential great hires because of Mini’s blog and the issues he raises for which he doesn’t see a resolution (ranking system, fat middle mgmt layer, etc)?

  8. Another question would be do you think you have lost some potential great hires because of Mini’s blog and the issues he raises for which he doesn’t see a resolution (ranking system, fat middle mgmt layer, etc)?

  9. Doug: I don’t know. Our hiring rates have been going up lately, not down, and the recent people we’ve hired (the team I’m on has hired tons) says Mini actually helped them because the company was more familiar. Sort of the “evil you know is better than the one you don’t.” Every big company has problems (heck, every small one too).

    Comic: PR doesn’t have a direct relationship on sales. Hope that helps.

    Apple is doing well cause it has a hot product that exceeded all expectations (even theirs).

  10. Doug: I don’t know. Our hiring rates have been going up lately, not down, and the recent people we’ve hired (the team I’m on has hired tons) says Mini actually helped them because the company was more familiar. Sort of the “evil you know is better than the one you don’t.” Every big company has problems (heck, every small one too).

    Comic: PR doesn’t have a direct relationship on sales. Hope that helps.

    Apple is doing well cause it has a hot product that exceeded all expectations (even theirs).

  11. you are confusing PR with marketing, Scoble, and besides BTW: did you mention that nokia has been firing people for blogging in your “naked” book? you should do it in next issue… and it is related to this blog item of yours – after all STIL there are compnaies that fire people for blogging and Microsoft does opposite so it is proof that Microsoft is not evil, right?

  12. you are confusing PR with marketing, Scoble, and besides BTW: did you mention that nokia has been firing people for blogging in your “naked” book? you should do it in next issue… and it is related to this blog item of yours – after all STIL there are compnaies that fire people for blogging and Microsoft does opposite so it is proof that Microsoft is not evil, right?

  13. I just came out of a wonderful two-hour interview with Forrester Research’s Charlene Li. She’s a lot more conservative with declkarations than either Scoble or me. But she cannot think of a single reason why every corporation doesn’t at least have an HR blog. “What a great recruitment tool,” she said. “The companies that don’t startone are losing out and it will only get worse,” she told me.

  14. I just came out of a wonderful two-hour interview with Forrester Research’s Charlene Li. She’s a lot more conservative with declkarations than either Scoble or me. But she cannot think of a single reason why every corporation doesn’t at least have an HR blog. “What a great recruitment tool,” she said. “The companies that don’t startone are losing out and it will only get worse,” she told me.

  15. Comic: who did they fire? But, no, I didn’t have any evidence of Nokia firing people.

    Getting some nice writeups in the Wall Street Journal is PR. The article is about corporate blogging. Makes you feel all warm and fuzzy. That’s PR.

    Now, if it said something about new products coming out, then maybe I would agree that it’s marketing.

    Microsoft could fire people for being stupid. Our rule isn’t “don’t blog.” It is “don’t be stupid.” The people I saw getting fired, that we wrote about, broke that rule.

  16. Comic: who did they fire? But, no, I didn’t have any evidence of Nokia firing people.

    Getting some nice writeups in the Wall Street Journal is PR. The article is about corporate blogging. Makes you feel all warm and fuzzy. That’s PR.

    Now, if it said something about new products coming out, then maybe I would agree that it’s marketing.

    Microsoft could fire people for being stupid. Our rule isn’t “don’t blog.” It is “don’t be stupid.” The people I saw getting fired, that we wrote about, broke that rule.

  17. [...] How have blogs influenced you? Over in Scobleland, they’re talking about how blogs can influence (positively and negatively) potential applicants to a join a company.  What do you think?  How have you utilized blogs to better understand Microsoft’s opportunities, structure, or culture?  Have they helped you better prep for interviews?  Any particularly helpful blogs out there?  Any blogs that made you step back and say, “Whoa …” :) gretchen Filed Under: Gretchen’s posts, Resume Tips, Interview Tips, Application Tips [...]

  18. I try to be a voice for blogging within my company but I wonder what the optimal route is? Should we just let everyone get their own blog and let that be the overall message contradictions and or is what Google does with its ‘official’ blog a good route? That’s one place where everyone from HR to Legal to Engineering to whatever can give their perspective of what the company is about?

  19. I try to be a voice for blogging within my company but I wonder what the optimal route is? Should we just let everyone get their own blog and let that be the overall message contradictions and or is what Google does with its ‘official’ blog a good route? That’s one place where everyone from HR to Legal to Engineering to whatever can give their perspective of what the company is about?

  20. On a teleconference last week, Richard Edelman (who happens to be the CEO of the company I work for), said that the biggest measureable impact he has seen with his blog has been in recruitment and retention, and that Edelman had hired at least six people through the blog.

    Oh, and his blog was also listed as one of the top corporate blogs in the WSJ article, not bad PR for prospective clients to see.

  21. On a teleconference last week, Richard Edelman (who happens to be the CEO of the company I work for), said that the biggest measureable impact he has seen with his blog has been in recruitment and retention, and that Edelman had hired at least six people through the blog.

    Oh, and his blog was also listed as one of the top corporate blogs in the WSJ article, not bad PR for prospective clients to see.

  22. “Would you join a company just cause they let you blog?”

    You mean blog as your livelihood?
    Blog during the work day on company time?
    Blog before or after work?

    A company doesn’t “let” you blog. You decide to blog unless you are some corporate automaton that needs someone to give them permisson to do every little thing.

  23. “Would you join a company just cause they let you blog?”

    You mean blog as your livelihood?
    Blog during the work day on company time?
    Blog before or after work?

    A company doesn’t “let” you blog. You decide to blog unless you are some corporate automaton that needs someone to give them permisson to do every little thing.

  24. Actually, I continue work in my current company because they let me freely surf websites and play BBS(an old blog equivalent(?) that runs on top of telnet instead of WWW) here (Of course these have to be a technical one)

    You see, we technical people easily tend to have difficulty to pickup new technologies after some age, and keeping connected with other people help countering this effect, and keep my skillset healthy.

  25. Actually, I continue work in my current company because they let me freely surf websites and play BBS(an old blog equivalent(?) that runs on top of telnet instead of WWW) here (Of course these have to be a technical one)

    You see, we technical people easily tend to have difficulty to pickup new technologies after some age, and keeping connected with other people help countering this effect, and keep my skillset healthy.

  26. I’m confused, Scoble. I thought your “real” job didn’t entail blogging. In which case, MS would seem to be neutral on “letting” their employees blog. IOW, as long as it doesn’t get in the way of why we pay you, party down.

    Is Gretchen’s blog part of her job? In which case they are “letting her blog”. Granted, you represent MS whether it’s your personal blog or not..at least from a legal representation perspective.

    I’d be curious to know how many MS employees have “blogging” as one of their measureable committments.

    The various team blogs (XBOX, Exchange, Sharepoint, etc) do seem to have the appearance of “MS endorsed blogs” but are they really? I mean, if those teams stopped blogging would managment ding them?

    I can see the value of HR deptments blogging (if their traditional recruting methods are proving to not be effective). I still don’t see how this convinces Amazon. They seem to encourage various and sundry customer interaction methods. Which, at the end of the day is the goal, right?

    From a “we want everyone in our company to blog” perspective, I’d have some concerns. Namely, are customers getting mixed messages from the company?
    Are sale people hearing things from corporate bloggers that they aren’t hearing from their Account Reps? Or different things than what they hear from their account reps, thus devaluling the account managment relationship? Not everything is a nail when it comes to using blogging. Blogging has it’s place, but its not a panacea. Which often times seems to be your message, which I’d be is not what you think.

  27. I’m confused, Scoble. I thought your “real” job didn’t entail blogging. In which case, MS would seem to be neutral on “letting” their employees blog. IOW, as long as it doesn’t get in the way of why we pay you, party down.

    Is Gretchen’s blog part of her job? In which case they are “letting her blog”. Granted, you represent MS whether it’s your personal blog or not..at least from a legal representation perspective.

    I’d be curious to know how many MS employees have “blogging” as one of their measureable committments.

    The various team blogs (XBOX, Exchange, Sharepoint, etc) do seem to have the appearance of “MS endorsed blogs” but are they really? I mean, if those teams stopped blogging would managment ding them?

    I can see the value of HR deptments blogging (if their traditional recruting methods are proving to not be effective). I still don’t see how this convinces Amazon. They seem to encourage various and sundry customer interaction methods. Which, at the end of the day is the goal, right?

    From a “we want everyone in our company to blog” perspective, I’d have some concerns. Namely, are customers getting mixed messages from the company?
    Are sale people hearing things from corporate bloggers that they aren’t hearing from their Account Reps? Or different things than what they hear from their account reps, thus devaluling the account managment relationship? Not everything is a nail when it comes to using blogging. Blogging has it’s place, but its not a panacea. Which often times seems to be your message, which I’d be is not what you think.

  28. #17, Cheong, I went through the BBS time as well, but I did not have that much difficulty picking up new technology.

    I’ve been coding since mid-80s and I know enough hardware stuffs too, so I guess that makes me a technical person too?

  29. #17, Cheong, I went through the BBS time as well, but I did not have that much difficulty picking up new technology.

    I’ve been coding since mid-80s and I know enough hardware stuffs too, so I guess that makes me a technical person too?

  30. I work at MS; blogging is NOT part of my commits, but it has helped my work. I’ve made business contacts through it that I otherwise wouldn’t have, been invited to events I otherwise wouldn’t have, and have made additional friends from around the industry. A couple of those industry contacts I’ve now brought in as potential hires – so there’s a snowball effect for HR to think about as well. [Gretchen: Has anyone checked the stats on the referral program? Has it ramped since blogging has taken off?]

    Scoble, Channel 9, and Gretchen’s blog were not the reason I chose to come to MS a year ago – but they WERE a positive force in the decision. All examples of a company that (my opinion from before joining and it hasn’t changed in the year I’ve ben here) really wants employees to talk directly to customers in order to build better products.

    Nothing wrong with that!

    [P.S. Scoble, I think CSB was himself fired from Nokia for blogging (heard him say so on Daily Source Code). However, the tone he's prone to using on his blog and in comment forums would lead one to guess that he was fired for what I'd deem "blogging irresponsibly"]

  31. I work at MS; blogging is NOT part of my commits, but it has helped my work. I’ve made business contacts through it that I otherwise wouldn’t have, been invited to events I otherwise wouldn’t have, and have made additional friends from around the industry. A couple of those industry contacts I’ve now brought in as potential hires – so there’s a snowball effect for HR to think about as well. [Gretchen: Has anyone checked the stats on the referral program? Has it ramped since blogging has taken off?]

    Scoble, Channel 9, and Gretchen’s blog were not the reason I chose to come to MS a year ago – but they WERE a positive force in the decision. All examples of a company that (my opinion from before joining and it hasn’t changed in the year I’ve ben here) really wants employees to talk directly to customers in order to build better products.

    Nothing wrong with that!

    [P.S. Scoble, I think CSB was himself fired from Nokia for blogging (heard him say so on Daily Source Code). However, the tone he's prone to using on his blog and in comment forums would lead one to guess that he was fired for what I'd deem "blogging irresponsibly"]

  32. Hiring fast? Hmmm, what about layoff? what about turn over? what about disgruntled employees that are there only for the convenience?

  33. Hiring fast? Hmmm, what about layoff? what about turn over? what about disgruntled employees that are there only for the convenience?

  34. Mmm. “Less evil” ? How many avoidable lawsuits does MS still have outstanding ? EU ? etc ?

    And how about “least trusted” ?

    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060330-6491.html

    Not only is MS the least trusted, its least trusted *by a long way*.

    And this isnt some dismissable ABM report. Its Forrester, who are usually Pro MS..

    Ouch.

    How are blogs going to fix *that* ? Add a “Fire Steve Balmber” voting button ?

    —* Bill

  35. Mmm. “Less evil” ? How many avoidable lawsuits does MS still have outstanding ? EU ? etc ?

    And how about “least trusted” ?

    http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20060330-6491.html

    Not only is MS the least trusted, its least trusted *by a long way*.

    And this isnt some dismissable ABM report. Its Forrester, who are usually Pro MS..

    Ouch.

    How are blogs going to fix *that* ? Add a “Fire Steve Balmber” voting button ?

    —* Bill

  36. Ummm, no. I wouldn’t join say a company like Enron or Global Crossing, even if they let me blog all the live long day. Besides with Microsoft, most of the bloggers are but puffy pointless cheerleading Evangelistic rot, while the company steers the ship into vaporware icebergs.

  37. Ummm, no. I wouldn’t join say a company like Enron or Global Crossing, even if they let me blog all the live long day. Besides with Microsoft, most of the bloggers are but puffy pointless cheerleading Evangelistic rot, while the company steers the ship into vaporware icebergs.

  38. I think blogging helps to bring a personal touch to a corporate face, it’s easy to forget there are real people behind big companies. For employees I think it really helps them to engage the customers if you have the means to freely talk to them. While the company I work for doesn’t blog I have used Amazon customer reviews of our products and forums to help gauge real customer opinion. I would certainly consider encouragement to blog by an employer a perk.

  39. I think blogging helps to bring a personal touch to a corporate face, it’s easy to forget there are real people behind big companies. For employees I think it really helps them to engage the customers if you have the means to freely talk to them. While the company I work for doesn’t blog I have used Amazon customer reviews of our products and forums to help gauge real customer opinion. I would certainly consider encouragement to blog by an employer a perk.

  40. @20. Again, all great for you, and marginal benefits for Microsoft. And, it appears that YOU are choosing to blogging. This is far different from MS “letting you blog”. Again, they seem to be neutral on their employess blogging. They neither encourage or discourage it–as part of the employees jobs.

    The real barometer would be if, all things being equal, someone were to be rewarded for blogging over someone who didn’t. Does that happen? I’ll repeat my oft asked question: Has blogging had a direct impact on MS sales and profits? For a company to “let their employees blog”, or even implement it as policy, it would want to see an ultimate impact on their bottom line. This was the crux of the Amazon debate.

    And from what I can tell, MS has had many programs, long before blogging, the encouraged employess to “talk directly to customers”. How successful those are is a different debate. While a tool to faclilitate interaction (provided comments are encourged), I would hardly classify blogging as “talking directly to the customer”. As Mini-Microsoft’s blog indicates… ACPOTI.

  41. Blogging shows an active and interested mind. It also presents a sample of what you’re capable of as a writer. While I wouldn’t consider the ability to blog to be a primary or even secondary reason for joining a company, you may be a more interesting applicant BECAUSE you blog, particularly if writing is part of the job description.

  42. @20. Again, all great for you, and marginal benefits for Microsoft. And, it appears that YOU are choosing to blogging. This is far different from MS “letting you blog”. Again, they seem to be neutral on their employess blogging. They neither encourage or discourage it–as part of the employees jobs.

    The real barometer would be if, all things being equal, someone were to be rewarded for blogging over someone who didn’t. Does that happen? I’ll repeat my oft asked question: Has blogging had a direct impact on MS sales and profits? For a company to “let their employees blog”, or even implement it as policy, it would want to see an ultimate impact on their bottom line. This was the crux of the Amazon debate.

    And from what I can tell, MS has had many programs, long before blogging, the encouraged employess to “talk directly to customers”. How successful those are is a different debate. While a tool to faclilitate interaction (provided comments are encourged), I would hardly classify blogging as “talking directly to the customer”. As Mini-Microsoft’s blog indicates… ACPOTI.

  43. Blogging shows an active and interested mind. It also presents a sample of what you’re capable of as a writer. While I wouldn’t consider the ability to blog to be a primary or even secondary reason for joining a company, you may be a more interesting applicant BECAUSE you blog, particularly if writing is part of the job description.

  44. Scoble, are you saying the Channel 9 is the thing that tips recruits to Microsoft over, say, Google? Or are you saying that of the recruits the MS has to ultimately settle on, Channel 9 was the one thing they said looked pretty cool about MS? Just wondering if Channel 9 is helping MS win people that would have otherwise gone with an otherwise more attractive offer?

  45. Scoble, are you saying the Channel 9 is the thing that tips recruits to Microsoft over, say, Google? Or are you saying that of the recruits the MS has to ultimately settle on, Channel 9 was the one thing they said looked pretty cool about MS? Just wondering if Channel 9 is helping MS win people that would have otherwise gone with an otherwise more attractive offer?

  46. Scoble, Gretchens numbers are a bit confusing. If I take them as written it would seem only .04% of the job applicants were hired from resumes coming in via job blogs. And it would appear only .01% were hired directly through JobBlogs. I gotta believe MS has a much better hiring percentage through traditional recruiting methods. This is hardly a testimony of the success of recruiting via blogging.

  47. Scoble, Gretchens numbers are a bit confusing. If I take them as written it would seem only .04% of the job applicants were hired from resumes coming in via job blogs. And it would appear only .01% were hired directly through JobBlogs. I gotta believe MS has a much better hiring percentage through traditional recruiting methods. This is hardly a testimony of the success of recruiting via blogging.

  48. [...] I was just thinking: what stops few motivated individuals from organizing an online conference? Maybe the structure isn’t as important as (wait for it…) context. What if 10-15 bloggers got together and aggregated themselves for some limited period of time, loosely tying their online blabbering to a topic. What if they invited some glorified blog-a-donna to do a “keynote” post? What stops this band of brothers from promoting this event just by linking and talking/commenting about it wherever/whenever an opportunity comes along? [...]

  49. Robert, a different way to look at your question is to consider blogs as a new job search tool for applicants.

    The company I work at, Tucows, has an in-house blogger, Joey Devilla who has a personal blog and developer relations blogs.

    When I was doing my job search and interview process with Tucows, I used Joey’s blog as a background check on Tucows. For example, did he write about the frustrations of work or his enjoyment of it? What did he do on the weekends? Work or enjoy the other parts of his life?

    My best tip for job research now is type ‘working at xyz company’ in Google and look for the blogs. It says alot if a person has a picture of their car in an empty parking lot with the caption ‘leaving work’. (I found that too!)
    siobhan

  50. Robert, a different way to look at your question is to consider blogs as a new job search tool for applicants.

    The company I work at, Tucows, has an in-house blogger, Joey Devilla who has a personal blog and developer relations blogs.

    When I was doing my job search and interview process with Tucows, I used Joey’s blog as a background check on Tucows. For example, did he write about the frustrations of work or his enjoyment of it? What did he do on the weekends? Work or enjoy the other parts of his life?

    My best tip for job research now is type ‘working at xyz company’ in Google and look for the blogs. It says alot if a person has a picture of their car in an empty parking lot with the caption ‘leaving work’. (I found that too!)
    siobhan

  51. I took up my current job not because Salesforce.com *lets* me blog, but because I am *encouraged* to blog. There’s a big difference.

    And plus, I love the passion of the SFDC community – low on buzzwords, high on getting things done. I like.

  52. I took up my current job not because Salesforce.com *lets* me blog, but because I am *encouraged* to blog. There’s a big difference.

    And plus, I love the passion of the SFDC community – low on buzzwords, high on getting things done. I like.

  53. Dmad: I never said blogging was a replacement for other methods. I just note that we got 3,000 resumes through Gretchen’s blog last year. Would we have gotten them if we didn’t have blogs? Maybe, but I doubt it after talking to some of the people who’ve joined Microsoft in the past year.

    As for “letting me blog.” Well, some of our competitors tell their employees not to blog and threaten their jobs if they do so. So, yes, Microsoft lets me blog is an accurate statement.

  54. Dmad: I never said blogging was a replacement for other methods. I just note that we got 3,000 resumes through Gretchen’s blog last year. Would we have gotten them if we didn’t have blogs? Maybe, but I doubt it after talking to some of the people who’ve joined Microsoft in the past year.

    As for “letting me blog.” Well, some of our competitors tell their employees not to blog and threaten their jobs if they do so. So, yes, Microsoft lets me blog is an accurate statement.

  55. Christopher: if blogging were allowed inside Enron or Global Crossing, would those companies have turned into the corrupt enterprises that they did?

    My thesis is that they would have been far less likely to turn corrupt.

  56. Christopher: if blogging were allowed inside Enron or Global Crossing, would those companies have turned into the corrupt enterprises that they did?

    My thesis is that they would have been far less likely to turn corrupt.

  57. Dmad – We would have gotten some, but not all, of those resumes had we not blogged, and actually our through-put for the blogging efforts is quite good compared to traditional means. And as Robert says, blogging is not a replacement for traditional means – just a supplement.

    But all of that aside, soliciting resumes is NOT the reason I blog. I blog to demystify our recruiting process and help people who have already decided to apply or interview be better prepared. Extra applicants is just icing on the cake.

  58. Dmad – We would have gotten some, but not all, of those resumes had we not blogged, and actually our through-put for the blogging efforts is quite good compared to traditional means. And as Robert says, blogging is not a replacement for traditional means – just a supplement.

    But all of that aside, soliciting resumes is NOT the reason I blog. I blog to demystify our recruiting process and help people who have already decided to apply or interview be better prepared. Extra applicants is just icing on the cake.

  59. @38. It’s clear from your blog soliciting resumes is not the goal. Which is why I find the discussion of the numbers a bit confusing. And more important, why Scoble even mentioned them.. given that he’s gone on record as saying blogging is “not about the numbers”. Very curious.

    @36. See answer above. If blogging is not about the numbers, then why even bring it up? And as for the resumes.. sure, perhaps. Then again, wearing a sandwich board on the corner of 156th and 40th might also have been just as effective in generating resumes. We’ll never know for sure,since.. well..it’s not about the numbers.

    And there is a difference between having a policy against blogging, having a policy encouraging blogging, and not caring one way or the other if your employees blog. One could just as accurately say Microsoft “let’s you drive to work”. My question remains unanswered: are there MS employees that are rewarded for blogging over those that choose not to? If so, then yes MS encourages blogging. If not, then I submit MS doesn’t care one way or the other.

  60. @38. It’s clear from your blog soliciting resumes is not the goal. Which is why I find the discussion of the numbers a bit confusing. And more important, why Scoble even mentioned them.. given that he’s gone on record as saying blogging is “not about the numbers”. Very curious.

    @36. See answer above. If blogging is not about the numbers, then why even bring it up? And as for the resumes.. sure, perhaps. Then again, wearing a sandwich board on the corner of 156th and 40th might also have been just as effective in generating resumes. We’ll never know for sure,since.. well..it’s not about the numbers.

    And there is a difference between having a policy against blogging, having a policy encouraging blogging, and not caring one way or the other if your employees blog. One could just as accurately say Microsoft “let’s you drive to work”. My question remains unanswered: are there MS employees that are rewarded for blogging over those that choose not to? If so, then yes MS encourages blogging. If not, then I submit MS doesn’t care one way or the other.

  61. My thesis is that they would have been far less likely to turn corrupt.

    Your blind utopian faith in mankind (and blogs) is beyond naive…of course such would of happened, they greased everyone’s hands, even analysts and the accountants (it all lead to the downfall of Arthur Andersen, member?), some spoon-fed blogger that doesn’t do heavy 9 to 5 investigative reporting would never discover the truth, and if they did, they’d be gone in under 2 seconds, and most likely sued. It happens to most whistleblowers. Even the big short sellers couldn’t rattle that cage, so some twiddling geeky bloggers gonna reverse human nature? Not a chance.

    Does your blogging stop bad things from happening at Microsoft? No. Did it stop the ‘stealing fonts’ issue? You are but post-reaction, not pre, pre will get you in NDA trouble and mostly likely fired.

  62. My thesis is that they would have been far less likely to turn corrupt.

    Your blind utopian faith in mankind (and blogs) is beyond naive…of course such would of happened, they greased everyone’s hands, even analysts and the accountants (it all lead to the downfall of Arthur Andersen, member?), some spoon-fed blogger that doesn’t do heavy 9 to 5 investigative reporting would never discover the truth, and if they did, they’d be gone in under 2 seconds, and most likely sued. It happens to most whistleblowers. Even the big short sellers couldn’t rattle that cage, so some twiddling geeky bloggers gonna reverse human nature? Not a chance.

    Does your blogging stop bad things from happening at Microsoft? No. Did it stop the ‘stealing fonts’ issue? You are but post-reaction, not pre, pre will get you in NDA trouble and mostly likely fired.

  63. I blog to demystify our recruiting process

    Maybe making it not so byzantine (in the first place) might help?

  64. I blog to demystify our recruiting process

    Maybe making it not so byzantine (in the first place) might help?