IE team responds to NYT article about Google’s hackles’ being raised

This morning on Memeorandum there are dozens of bloggers reacting to a New York Times article about IE 7.

Dean Hachamovitch, head of the Internet Explorer team responds: "the search box in IE7 is not Microsoft’s. It belongs to the user. Our guiding principle for the search box in IE7 is that the user is in control."

Nicholas Carr makes an even more interesting point: "If Google wants to fully live up to its ideals – to really give primacy to the goal of user choice in search – it should open up its home page to other search engines."

135 thoughts on “IE team responds to NYT article about Google’s hackles’ being raised

  1. Gawd Kids, lets all grow up and get lives shall we?

    IE7 or 6 & Firefox are just silly stupid browsers. Use what you want and configure it to what you need.

    Everyone acts like they don’t have choices…..I mean, if you are Microsoft, are you suppose to pre-select Yahoo as the default search engine in IE? And if Google and Firefox have a “thing” going, so what?

    Sure beats someone like a federal government dictating what we use and how we use it…

  2. Gawd Kids, lets all grow up and get lives shall we?

    IE7 or 6 & Firefox are just silly stupid browsers. Use what you want and configure it to what you need.

    Everyone acts like they don’t have choices…..I mean, if you are Microsoft, are you suppose to pre-select Yahoo as the default search engine in IE? And if Google and Firefox have a “thing” going, so what?

    Sure beats someone like a federal government dictating what we use and how we use it…

  3. I’m not seeing why Google is in a tiff. Three mouse clicks is all it takes to add their search engine to the toolbar and make it the default. Are they making noise because their engine is not distributed as part of the package and needs to be added by the user? That’s just a childish tantrum.

  4. I’m not seeing why Google is in a tiff. Three mouse clicks is all it takes to add their search engine to the toolbar and make it the default. Are they making noise because their engine is not distributed as part of the package and needs to be added by the user? That’s just a childish tantrum.

  5. I don’t know if I see the colossus of software putting its search as being default a surprise in any way. Really I couldn’t care one way or the other, but the arguments made here are really good. Firefox can use MSN search according to like, 3 guys on this blog comment list. But ppl keep saying that it isn’t possible.

    To say google is having a double standard is rediculous and unintelligent. Google has no OS, to populate the world, nor does it therefore control the desktop of all new to computer folk in existance, as MS does. Google is the search on Firefox (lets just say that they are the only game FF allows). What are the usage statistics for IE vs FF? You guys argue over default=good/bad.. whatever. The point is that it is easily forseeable that this default search issue could topple a better search just in its “convenience” to novices.

    I don’t use MSN search, and haven’t since Google started (or was it webcrawler.. hmm.). Scoble’s buddy Chris Pirillo practically went on detox not using google for a period of time. And his frustrations are apparent and listed plainly as a user that WOULD use good search terms (as he’s in industry, I would assume he would know how to do this) and still could not get good results for.. well most anything using.. well everything BUT google.

    Google is better, duh. MSN wants to bring it all in house.. duh.
    I really don’t see that being a problem if they could provide the product of quality that even could stand next to google. As of now, its not there. I wonder if MS has considered “upgrading features” in vista so that google couldn’t get its google desktop to work on there. (thats just a question really, not an accusation.. but we all know its been done and is done regularly)

  6. I don’t know if I see the colossus of software putting its search as being default a surprise in any way. Really I couldn’t care one way or the other, but the arguments made here are really good. Firefox can use MSN search according to like, 3 guys on this blog comment list. But ppl keep saying that it isn’t possible.

    To say google is having a double standard is rediculous and unintelligent. Google has no OS, to populate the world, nor does it therefore control the desktop of all new to computer folk in existance, as MS does. Google is the search on Firefox (lets just say that they are the only game FF allows). What are the usage statistics for IE vs FF? You guys argue over default=good/bad.. whatever. The point is that it is easily forseeable that this default search issue could topple a better search just in its “convenience” to novices.

    I don’t use MSN search, and haven’t since Google started (or was it webcrawler.. hmm.). Scoble’s buddy Chris Pirillo practically went on detox not using google for a period of time. And his frustrations are apparent and listed plainly as a user that WOULD use good search terms (as he’s in industry, I would assume he would know how to do this) and still could not get good results for.. well most anything using.. well everything BUT google.

    Google is better, duh. MSN wants to bring it all in house.. duh.
    I really don’t see that being a problem if they could provide the product of quality that even could stand next to google. As of now, its not there. I wonder if MS has considered “upgrading features” in vista so that google couldn’t get its google desktop to work on there. (thats just a question really, not an accusation.. but we all know its been done and is done regularly)

  7. Hmm i am really pissed off on seeing Google’s reaction. Why? Because just couple of weeks back I bought a new Dell Inspiron 1505 notebook. I was really shocked to see that Google search box was by DEFAULT added to the Internet Explorer.

    Now if the same thing is done by Microsoft on its (IE 7) own Browser to set MSN as their default search engine (that too configurable) google is getting paranoid .. really funny. Don’t a company have an option to popularize their product?

    Ed Bott in his article http://www.edbott.com/weblog/?p=1321 has explained with screenshots on how changing providers in IE7 is about the same as changing in Firefox. An interesting point which he has added is “MSN Search is NOT an option in Firefox while Google IS an option in IE7″!!!

    Now, will Google put real pressure on Firefox to let Microsoft Search in their existing list?

    That said, So I don’t think people would really take seriously as everyone by now would have known that “Google follow double standards” :)

  8. Hmm i am really pissed off on seeing Google’s reaction. Why? Because just couple of weeks back I bought a new Dell Inspiron 1505 notebook. I was really shocked to see that Google search box was by DEFAULT added to the Internet Explorer.

    Now if the same thing is done by Microsoft on its (IE 7) own Browser to set MSN as their default search engine (that too configurable) google is getting paranoid .. really funny. Don’t a company have an option to popularize their product?

    Ed Bott in his article http://www.edbott.com/weblog/?p=1321 has explained with screenshots on how changing providers in IE7 is about the same as changing in Firefox. An interesting point which he has added is “MSN Search is NOT an option in Firefox while Google IS an option in IE7″!!!

    Now, will Google put real pressure on Firefox to let Microsoft Search in their existing list?

    That said, So I don’t think people would really take seriously as everyone by now would have known that “Google follow double standards” :)

  9. Eric Nordberg, you missed the point. Google search page has two parts. Main search result which Google chooses, sort of default. And if you do not like default then you could pay to Google to be shown on the side.

    Not setting the default for the search box is also default. In this case, Microsoft runs a risk that it is giving a functionality which does not work at the beginning.

    As such whatever default Microsoft choose, its only obligation is to allow others to change that default. Anybody who is on the chain from Microsoft to consumers could change the default. It is bad for Google it is not in the chain. Well, sometimes you are not given the opportunity naturally but have to buy it.

    In this case, it is good for consumers. Because that way search engines compete for getting users just like any business. Why do you want to treat search engine business from any other. Any other business buys customer. Either by making right partnership or by aggresive marketing. Both of these choices are open to Google.

    If Google tries to be frugal and does not want to spend money on advertising then it is not Microsoft’s fault. If Google tries to be selfish and does not want to share its revenue via OEMs then it is again not Microsoft’s fault. If Google wants to compete only on quality and not on value then again it is not Microsoft’s fault. Microsoft is playing fair and protecting consumer here. Microsoft is giving customers the most important tool called “bargaining”. Customers will need this tool for a lot of other online services.

    PS: The commentator is a Microsoft employee. This is his opinion only.

  10. Eric Nordberg, you missed the point. Google search page has two parts. Main search result which Google chooses, sort of default. And if you do not like default then you could pay to Google to be shown on the side.

    Not setting the default for the search box is also default. In this case, Microsoft runs a risk that it is giving a functionality which does not work at the beginning.

    As such whatever default Microsoft choose, its only obligation is to allow others to change that default. Anybody who is on the chain from Microsoft to consumers could change the default. It is bad for Google it is not in the chain. Well, sometimes you are not given the opportunity naturally but have to buy it.

    In this case, it is good for consumers. Because that way search engines compete for getting users just like any business. Why do you want to treat search engine business from any other. Any other business buys customer. Either by making right partnership or by aggresive marketing. Both of these choices are open to Google.

    If Google tries to be frugal and does not want to spend money on advertising then it is not Microsoft’s fault. If Google tries to be selfish and does not want to share its revenue via OEMs then it is again not Microsoft’s fault. If Google wants to compete only on quality and not on value then again it is not Microsoft’s fault. Microsoft is playing fair and protecting consumer here. Microsoft is giving customers the most important tool called “bargaining”. Customers will need this tool for a lot of other online services.

    PS: The commentator is a Microsoft employee. This is his opinion only.

  11. Microsoft Corp.’s long- awaited release of the upgrade to its flagship Windows operating system will likely be delayed again by at least three months, research group Gartner Inc. said on Tuesday.

    Something is screwy with your testbed.

    Typing “test” in firefox on Windows XP makes the browser attempt a connection to http://test.yourdnsdomain.whatever . If that computer is not found or does not have a web browser enabled, the browser attempts a connection to http://www.test.com .

    Google has nothing to do with it and is never polled in the process.

  12. Microsoft Corp.’s long- awaited release of the upgrade to its flagship Windows operating system will likely be delayed again by at least three months, research group Gartner Inc. said on Tuesday.

    Something is screwy with your testbed.

    Typing “test” in firefox on Windows XP makes the browser attempt a connection to http://test.yourdnsdomain.whatever . If that computer is not found or does not have a web browser enabled, the browser attempts a connection to http://www.test.com .

    Google has nothing to do with it and is never polled in the process.

  13. With a fresh install of Firefox under OSX or WinXP (Wheee for Parallels), typing “test” into the address bar results in a page telling me that http://test/ could not be found. What do you see?Something is screwy with your testbed then. I’ve installed firefox on at least dozens of computers, and they have always done an “I’m feeling Lucky” google search of unidentified words in the address bar – unless it contains a period, in which case it assumes a TLD.

  14. What’s happening here is really obvious.

    Microsoft is attempting to leverage the same Windows bundling techniques with search that it used to gain share in web browsers, media players and instant messengers.

    It might only mean fines in Europe and the Far East, but a Sherman Antitrust conviction in the United States means your stock price drops in half again.

    Hey, it’s your money.

    And consider all that stock benefit you softie employees got by killing off Netscape… Where’s your stock today in comparison with when Netscape was at it’s peak? Surely, you don’t believe if Microsoft kills off Google it will add $100 billion in market cap to itself?

    At some point, the Microsoft “geeks” need to start thinking about other “geeks” at other companies – and whether trumping antitrust law, cheating for marketshare, or buying up customers (ala A9/live.com) benefits software engineers as much as it benefits the pointy-headed bosses, the powerpoint wranglers and the beancounters at your expense.

  15. With a fresh install of Firefox under OSX or WinXP (Wheee for Parallels), typing “test” into the address bar results in a page telling me that http://test/ could not be found. What do you see?Something is screwy with your testbed then. I’ve installed firefox on at least dozens of computers, and they have always done an “I’m feeling Lucky” google search of unidentified words in the address bar – unless it contains a period, in which case it assumes a TLD.

  16. What’s happening here is really obvious.

    Microsoft is attempting to leverage the same Windows bundling techniques with search that it used to gain share in web browsers, media players and instant messengers.

    It might only mean fines in Europe and the Far East, but a Sherman Antitrust conviction in the United States means your stock price drops in half again.

    Hey, it’s your money.

    And consider all that stock benefit you softie employees got by killing off Netscape… Where’s your stock today in comparison with when Netscape was at it’s peak? Surely, you don’t believe if Microsoft kills off Google it will add $100 billion in market cap to itself?

    At some point, the Microsoft “geeks” need to start thinking about other “geeks” at other companies – and whether trumping antitrust law, cheating for marketshare, or buying up customers (ala A9/live.com) benefits software engineers as much as it benefits the pointy-headed bosses, the powerpoint wranglers and the beancounters at your expense.

  17. Hey,

    To the confused reader above (re: configuring firefox), type “about:config” in the address bar. Adjust search as desired.

    To the google-detractor above you are correct “flower” doesn’t return 1800Flowers or ftd.com. Search for “flowers” however and you do get those results. I believe this is just more intelligent search (and I work at msft for goodness sake!)

    I agree with many other folks on this page – IE must represent msft’s commitment to openness and fairness by allowing the user to choose (preferably during install) their default search. If that’s google then so be it. Our search (Windows Live) should win on its own merits – not b/c it’s a default in a browser included w/ the most common OS on the planet. We no longer have the benefit of the doubt as a company. We must earn back our user’s trust. I think our products and services are good enough to win on their own merit. Let the user choose and let them choose in a manner that reflects the openness, fairness and honesty of our company.

  18. Hey,

    To the confused reader above (re: configuring firefox), type “about:config” in the address bar. Adjust search as desired.

    To the google-detractor above you are correct “flower” doesn’t return 1800Flowers or ftd.com. Search for “flowers” however and you do get those results. I believe this is just more intelligent search (and I work at msft for goodness sake!)

    I agree with many other folks on this page – IE must represent msft’s commitment to openness and fairness by allowing the user to choose (preferably during install) their default search. If that’s google then so be it. Our search (Windows Live) should win on its own merits – not b/c it’s a default in a browser included w/ the most common OS on the planet. We no longer have the benefit of the doubt as a company. We must earn back our user’s trust. I think our products and services are good enough to win on their own merit. Let the user choose and let them choose in a manner that reflects the openness, fairness and honesty of our company.

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  20. I think that Microsoft could do what they want with there browser and Google shouldn’t give opinions on how they do there stuff. Google should have more confidents in then selves and stop worrying about Microsoft. May i say “Scary Cat”.

  21. I think that Microsoft could do what they want with there browser and Google shouldn’t give opinions on how they do there stuff. Google should have more confidents in then selves and stop worrying about Microsoft. May i say “Scary Cat”.

  22. I have to laugh at everyone advocating that features of an application be disabled until choices are made. There are millions of computer users that are relatively new to computers whom would be frustrated and lost trying to figure out how to make the change.

    I work with hundreds of individuals on a daily basis that fall into this catagory. These are folks that are confused just looking at the array of choices that are on start menu! Software should ALWAYS have a default set so that EVERY function works WITHOUT having to tweak settings.

    Let’s not forget that computers are quickly becoming a neccessity, not an option, to function in todays society. There is no need to make things more difficult for novice users, and older folks that have trouble just looking at the screen to see it and who typically peck at the keys just to make ANYTHING happen!

    Society is made up of many more catalogies of users than the power users who typically freqent these pages making comments about what should be done without considering everyone as a whole.

  23. I have to laugh at everyone advocating that features of an application be disabled until choices are made. There are millions of computer users that are relatively new to computers whom would be frustrated and lost trying to figure out how to make the change.

    I work with hundreds of individuals on a daily basis that fall into this catagory. These are folks that are confused just looking at the array of choices that are on start menu! Software should ALWAYS have a default set so that EVERY function works WITHOUT having to tweak settings.

    Let’s not forget that computers are quickly becoming a neccessity, not an option, to function in todays society. There is no need to make things more difficult for novice users, and older folks that have trouble just looking at the screen to see it and who typically peck at the keys just to make ANYTHING happen!

    Society is made up of many more catalogies of users than the power users who typically freqent these pages making comments about what should be done without considering everyone as a whole.

  24. Wow, some interesting arguments. Some people though mistake Google for a monopoly, they are not. Yes they are the dominant search provider, but that does not make them a monolopy by federal standards. If Google was required to browse the internet on say 60% of all PCs then yes, they would probably be considered a monopoly.

    Yes, Google is grousing, but as I said before Microsoft is an acknowledged monopoly and thus has different rules. That said people will be able to change IE7 search just as easily as IE6 or Firefox, so probably not a real issue.

    As several have stated, maybe Google realizes Microsoft has genuine hit with their “new” search. Heck, will all that is being said, I am going spend sometime using it, just to see and I haven’t used MSFT search (other than what is built into their apps) in well over a year.

    Competition is good, and Microsoft is really starting to work on the quality of their apps and such. I support that effort wholeheartedly so long as competition is based on quality and not one’s ability to predetermine or bundle applications.

    If you feel strongly about the issues surrounding IE Search then vote with your queries, because that will be good for all of us (unless of course the government forces ISPs and vendors to keep logs of everything, that is a waaaay more important debate)

  25. Wow, some interesting arguments. Some people though mistake Google for a monopoly, they are not. Yes they are the dominant search provider, but that does not make them a monolopy by federal standards. If Google was required to browse the internet on say 60% of all PCs then yes, they would probably be considered a monopoly.

    Yes, Google is grousing, but as I said before Microsoft is an acknowledged monopoly and thus has different rules. That said people will be able to change IE7 search just as easily as IE6 or Firefox, so probably not a real issue.

    As several have stated, maybe Google realizes Microsoft has genuine hit with their “new” search. Heck, will all that is being said, I am going spend sometime using it, just to see and I haven’t used MSFT search (other than what is built into their apps) in well over a year.

    Competition is good, and Microsoft is really starting to work on the quality of their apps and such. I support that effort wholeheartedly so long as competition is based on quality and not one’s ability to predetermine or bundle applications.

    If you feel strongly about the issues surrounding IE Search then vote with your queries, because that will be good for all of us (unless of course the government forces ISPs and vendors to keep logs of everything, that is a waaaay more important debate)

  26. The thing that lacks the most competitive fairness about Microsoft, is that regardless what I set for my default, IE opens when other Microsoft software requires something like ActiveX. Since MS Show requires IE, users are not allowed a choice in that case. There are many examples, but a webinar reaches more than just one user at a time.

    I see ActiveX as a child of Embrace, Extend and Extinguish technology. It’s sooo obvious that it hides in plain sight. I think serious concerns have merit, and Google is a day late in lodging them.

    -detlev

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