I’ve shared my OPML, will you?

I've already shared my OPML with Dave Winer's new service. Opens tomorrow. TechCrunch has the details. If you can't wait, my current feed list is on NewsGator (it's a Web service so you'll always see the latest list here). Two weeks ago I deleted all my feeds. I'm already back up to 99 feeds. Will be adding more over the next week. I've raised the bar to get added to my list, though. I want to increase the geekiness factor of what I'm reading and get away from the more marketing and business oriented blogs. Why? Cause I want to focus on people building software, since that's what I'm interested in most.

How do you pick feeds to subscribe to? How do you clean them out?

Update: Dave Winer says "it's an instant hit" and gives more details.

Comments

  1. One idea I’ve had (which I don’t know of an RSS reader that supports) is for the application to “track” which feeds I actually read and/or click-through to.

    Then, it would be easier to “prune” feeds that just haven’t generated any interesting content over some period (like 30-60 days).

    If this were a desktop app, it could approximate what I was “reading” by simply watching how much time I spend on a particular article. Of course, anything I click on would be deemed to have been at least somewhat interesting.

    In any case, a thought. I keep meaning to cleanup my feed list, but never do — and something like this would help.

    Its the RSS equivalent to the idea of boxing up old junk in the house and putting a date on it. Five years later, if the box has been unopened, you just throw it out without opening it.

  2. One idea I’ve had (which I don’t know of an RSS reader that supports) is for the application to “track” which feeds I actually read and/or click-through to.

    Then, it would be easier to “prune” feeds that just haven’t generated any interesting content over some period (like 30-60 days).

    If this were a desktop app, it could approximate what I was “reading” by simply watching how much time I spend on a particular article. Of course, anything I click on would be deemed to have been at least somewhat interesting.

    In any case, a thought. I keep meaning to cleanup my feed list, but never do — and something like this would help.

    Its the RSS equivalent to the idea of boxing up old junk in the house and putting a date on it. Five years later, if the box has been unopened, you just throw it out without opening it.

  3. having just spent a week in India if you want intense live breathe 24×7 geek stuff you should spend some time there…it was good to see so many young folks just in to technology…me I am just an old fart who worries more about what you call the business oriented stuff. Someone’s got to keep geek costs and payback aligned!I have a feeling you will be going back and forth between geeky and business stuff – you are too much of a blogging pioneer to not get dragged in to busienss stuff…

  4. having just spent a week in India if you want intense live breathe 24×7 geek stuff you should spend some time there…it was good to see so many young folks just in to technology…me I am just an old fart who worries more about what you call the business oriented stuff. Someone’s got to keep geek costs and payback aligned!I have a feeling you will be going back and forth between geeky and business stuff – you are too much of a blogging pioneer to not get dragged in to busienss stuff…

  5. I dump feeds from my subscriptions when I get sick of skipping past it’s entries in the list of unread entires.

    I add feeds whenever I find a new blog by following links. If the linked article is interesting I go to the main page of the blog and if I come across a second interesting article on the front page I subscribe until it reaches the dump threshold.

    The only problem is that blogs that don’t post often generally stay in my list forever, but at least they don’t take up any of my time.

    As you go around readding feeds to your list, if you find any that are particularly focussed on development processes (particularly real life experience with adopting or using them) I’d appreciate it if you could highlight them. As an example, we’re adopting XP so I’m trying to keep track of my experiences and lessons learnt on my blog – I’d be interested in finding similar entries from other people adopting XP as well as other development methods (maybe trying to use the waterfall method better etc).

    While I’m commenting (I lurk on the RSS feed mostly), your blog has been much more enjoyable since the recent reflections on life and reviewing of your feeds. Keep it up.

  6. I dump feeds from my subscriptions when I get sick of skipping past it’s entries in the list of unread entires.

    I add feeds whenever I find a new blog by following links. If the linked article is interesting I go to the main page of the blog and if I come across a second interesting article on the front page I subscribe until it reaches the dump threshold.

    The only problem is that blogs that don’t post often generally stay in my list forever, but at least they don’t take up any of my time.

    As you go around readding feeds to your list, if you find any that are particularly focussed on development processes (particularly real life experience with adopting or using them) I’d appreciate it if you could highlight them. As an example, we’re adopting XP so I’m trying to keep track of my experiences and lessons learnt on my blog – I’d be interested in finding similar entries from other people adopting XP as well as other development methods (maybe trying to use the waterfall method better etc).

    While I’m commenting (I lurk on the RSS feed mostly), your blog has been much more enjoyable since the recent reflections on life and reviewing of your feeds. Keep it up.

  7. Cool new way to share your OPML

    Robert Scoble has a post about a new OPML sharing service that Dave Winer is launching.  You can read all about it at TechCrunch.
    Uploaded my OPML file of all my current feeds, and browsed around the service.  Its really quite interesting the ways y…

  8. Am I the only retrograde reader out here? I was a feed junky for a good long time, but these days I’m back to URL’s and HTML – RSS seems to leach content of its character, and I like to slow down, navigate a site, and see what else hangs off of it as opposed to sponging as much raw feed-data as quickly as possible. Goofy? Probably.

  9. Am I the only retrograde reader out here? I was a feed junky for a good long time, but these days I’m back to URL’s and HTML – RSS seems to leach content of its character, and I like to slow down, navigate a site, and see what else hangs off of it as opposed to sponging as much raw feed-data as quickly as possible. Goofy? Probably.

  10. @5 Well, not goofy in my book. I’ve just finished my RSS subscription rehab and I can tell you it is quite liberating.

  11. @5 Well, not goofy in my book. I’ve just finished my RSS subscription rehab and I can tell you it is quite liberating.

  12. Rod: I went back to HTML for a few months. I hated it for a bunch of reasons. I missed my aggregator big time. Why? Cause I can read a LOT more efficiently in a news aggregator.

    Look at my blog. Why do you care what’s on my sidebar? It never changes. I just want to visit the content that changes. If I need to visit the sidebar, then I know how to get to the HTML too.

  13. Rod: I went back to HTML for a few months. I hated it for a bunch of reasons. I missed my aggregator big time. Why? Cause I can read a LOT more efficiently in a news aggregator.

    Look at my blog. Why do you care what’s on my sidebar? It never changes. I just want to visit the content that changes. If I need to visit the sidebar, then I know how to get to the HTML too.

  14. Looks good, works well.

    Since I just signed up and my userID is still a fairly low number (384) I would not say it is an ‘instant hit’ but a decent enough start, let’s compare again at the end of the day.

    It does need some more remix and republish options.

    http://share.opml.org/viewsharedfeeds/?user_id=384
    (fun minigame: change the userID at the end of the feed and see who the first 10 users of this service were)

  15. Looks good, works well.

    Since I just signed up and my userID is still a fairly low number (384) I would not say it is an ‘instant hit’ but a decent enough start, let’s compare again at the end of the day.

    It does need some more remix and republish options.

    http://share.opml.org/viewsharedfeeds/?user_id=384
    (fun minigame: change the userID at the end of the feed and see who the first 10 users of this service were)

  16. [...] Share Your OPML (it had to happen) So, who would have thought that OPML would be a big deal? ;-)The interest in Dave Winer’s latest project, Share Your OPML, is the reason for OPML’s Attention this weekend. And with good reason too. Dave hinted at this project at last week’s Seattle Mind Camp where we discussed Attention. This app / service is so inline with the OPML as an Attention data file thinking.I’ve shared mine here. The service doesn’t offiicially launch until Monday, but there’s already plenty of OPML sharing going on. Steve Rubel, Robert Scoble, Michael Arrington and JWynia are blogging (and sharing) this too, and plenty more.Nice thing is I can see who is sub’d to me. So far on this two feeds (one gen’d by this blogware, the other is a Feedbuner feed I created in September.Alex Barnett blog (feedburner – this one’s better ;-) [...]

  17. Hmm….This is a very interesting service by Dave Winer. While practically it may not serve any purpose, the stats part and that of being one in the community is innovative.

    Will follow this up.

  18. Hmm….This is a very interesting service by Dave Winer. While practically it may not serve any purpose, the stats part and that of being one in the community is innovative.

    Will follow this up.

  19. The two most interesting things I’ve noticed are that I seem to subscribe to a lot of feeds. More than I thought and more than a lot of other people. Also that Robert has somehow forgotten to add his wife’s blog to his list. :-)
    I’m thinking that I may drop some of the more heavily subscribed feeds. After all if everyone else is reading them than most likely one of them will link to the really interesting things they say and save me some time. It’s a theory.

  20. The two most interesting things I’ve noticed are that I seem to subscribe to a lot of feeds. More than I thought and more than a lot of other people. Also that Robert has somehow forgotten to add his wife’s blog to his list. :-)
    I’m thinking that I may drop some of the more heavily subscribed feeds. After all if everyone else is reading them than most likely one of them will link to the really interesting things they say and save me some time. It’s a theory.

  21. Robert: Nah, I won’t be sharing my OPML. (Although an old copy of my subs may be in there somewhere.) There’s just not any incentive.

    I mean, first off, the service doesn’t actually *do* anything beyond create Yet Another Top 100 List. But more importantly, I do a lot more than read blogs with feeds.

    I’m subscribed to lots of “utility feeds”, for example. New referrers for my blogs come to me via RSS. Email comes to me from Google’s Atom feeds. Private forum messages. Up-to-date VersionTracker info. Ego searches from Technorati and PubSub and Icerocket. So even if much of it weren’t inappropriate for public distribution, it still wouldn’t be of any use to anyone else.

    The only OPML I can see sharing would be generated from my blogrolls. Anyone who wants that info, though, can get it without going to a third-party site.

    “Reading lists” have a certain limited appeal, but generalized OPML sharing just doesn’t make sense to me.

  22. Robert: Nah, I won’t be sharing my OPML. (Although an old copy of my subs may be in there somewhere.) There’s just not any incentive.

    I mean, first off, the service doesn’t actually *do* anything beyond create Yet Another Top 100 List. But more importantly, I do a lot more than read blogs with feeds.

    I’m subscribed to lots of “utility feeds”, for example. New referrers for my blogs come to me via RSS. Email comes to me from Google’s Atom feeds. Private forum messages. Up-to-date VersionTracker info. Ego searches from Technorati and PubSub and Icerocket. So even if much of it weren’t inappropriate for public distribution, it still wouldn’t be of any use to anyone else.

    The only OPML I can see sharing would be generated from my blogrolls. Anyone who wants that info, though, can get it without going to a third-party site.

    “Reading lists” have a certain limited appeal, but generalized OPML sharing just doesn’t make sense to me.

  23. Robert, I tihnk I might have to burn’n’purge as you’ve done, especially since Newsgator Online is not letting me export my OPML. Finicky. I love Ngator but it’s not nearly as simple as Bloglines, for example, in that regard (importing/exporting OPML). But this SYO tool (Share Your OPML) certainly looks very useful and as soon as my ego feeds are out of the way I hope to stick my OPML into it :).

  24. Robert, I tihnk I might have to burn’n’purge as you’ve done, especially since Newsgator Online is not letting me export my OPML. Finicky. I love Ngator but it’s not nearly as simple as Bloglines, for example, in that regard (importing/exporting OPML). But this SYO tool (Share Your OPML) certainly looks very useful and as soon as my ego feeds are out of the way I hope to stick my OPML into it :).

  25. Am I the only person left who just doesn’t have the time to read that many RSS feeds? I mean, 99 feeds and counting? I think it’s great that your job allows you to do this, but how practical is this tool for the 99% of us whose job is not specifically about reading/blogging? Frankly, I’m much more interested in hearing about the 8 blogs total you *read*, than the kajillion whose headlines you scan from time to time.

  26. Am I the only person left who just doesn’t have the time to read that many RSS feeds? I mean, 99 feeds and counting? I think it’s great that your job allows you to do this, but how practical is this tool for the 99% of us whose job is not specifically about reading/blogging? Frankly, I’m much more interested in hearing about the 8 blogs total you *read*, than the kajillion whose headlines you scan from time to time.

  27. Mine’s up.
    On Friday’s I just take a good look at what I haven’t gotten to and delete most of those. Not too much of a task.
    Ken

  28. Mine’s up.
    On Friday’s I just take a good look at what I haven’t gotten to and delete most of those. Not too much of a task.
    Ken

  29. I read from about 30 – 40 feeds, about every other day. Or if I cannot find anything to blog about I will fire it up and see what is going on. Failing that I will got to tech.memeorandum.

  30. I read from about 30 – 40 feeds, about every other day. Or if I cannot find anything to blog about I will fire it up and see what is going on. Failing that I will got to tech.memeorandum.

  31. [...] The world’s buzzing over Dave Winer’s new toy, share.opml.org, which is a site for sharing your reading list with others. Mike Arrington, Steve Rubel, Robert Scoble, and a bunch of other folks are gaga over this thing.   In a nutshell, you can upload your blogroll (in OPML format, hence the name), publish it, and then use a variety of other tools to find out what it is that others like yourself are reading. [...]

  32. Robert, if the sidebar doesn’t add any more information for a visitor to your site, it probably shouldn’t be there (other than a reason that it is a standard procedure in blogs) :)
    ———————————–
    I don’t have time to read a million blogs, so I don’t use an aggregator. Different people, different requirements, different solutions.
    It would be interesting to see what new feeds you’ve started subscribing to.

    No one has posted their opml here, wasn’t that the intent of this post? :) I don’t have any, so nothing useful here too.

    ————————————–

    Please don’t kick out marketing from your radar. I thought you were the bridge between the geeks and the non-geeks.

  33. Robert, if the sidebar doesn’t add any more information for a visitor to your site, it probably shouldn’t be there (other than a reason that it is a standard procedure in blogs) :)
    ———————————–
    I don’t have time to read a million blogs, so I don’t use an aggregator. Different people, different requirements, different solutions.
    It would be interesting to see what new feeds you’ve started subscribing to.

    No one has posted their opml here, wasn’t that the intent of this post? :) I don’t have any, so nothing useful here too.

    ————————————–

    Please don’t kick out marketing from your radar. I thought you were the bridge between the geeks and the non-geeks.

  34. I recently started using Onfolio, after it came bundled as part of the Windows Live toolbar.

    Onfolio is doing a great job – has this nice concept of generating “newspapers” to read for you out of your subscriptions. And that way it is pretty much easy for me to filter read items, unread items, items by date, etc.

    I briefly tried Outlook 12 – but it is still not ready. Each time I set it up, after a while, it just stops sync-ing for some reason and the only fix I discovered was to delete and add again.

    Before that I used Abilon – good reader, but has its own little bugs.

    Managing feeds – I take a monthly backup (read: whenever I remember) of the OPML so I don’t lose out on the URLs. Wise thing to do – backups. Especially if you haven’t yet standardized on a feedreader. And then of course, if I don’t go to a folder for a while, I just go ahead and delete it. Because if I am not reading it regularily, it probably means I am not going to read it in the future as well.

  35. I recently started using Onfolio, after it came bundled as part of the Windows Live toolbar.

    Onfolio is doing a great job – has this nice concept of generating “newspapers” to read for you out of your subscriptions. And that way it is pretty much easy for me to filter read items, unread items, items by date, etc.

    I briefly tried Outlook 12 – but it is still not ready. Each time I set it up, after a while, it just stops sync-ing for some reason and the only fix I discovered was to delete and add again.

    Before that I used Abilon – good reader, but has its own little bugs.

    Managing feeds – I take a monthly backup (read: whenever I remember) of the OPML so I don’t lose out on the URLs. Wise thing to do – backups. Especially if you haven’t yet standardized on a feedreader. And then of course, if I don’t go to a folder for a while, I just go ahead and delete it. Because if I am not reading it regularily, it probably means I am not going to read it in the future as well.

  36. I recently started using Onfolio, after it came bundled as part of the Windows Live toolbar.

    Onfolio is doing a great job – has this nice concept of generating “newspapers” to read for you out of your subscriptions. And that way it is pretty much easy for me to filter read items, unread items, items by date, etc.

    I briefly tried Outlook 12 – but it is still not ready. Each time I set it up, after a while, it just stops sync-ing for some reason and the only fix I discovered was to delete and add again.

    Before that I used Abilon – good reader, but has its own little bugs.

    Managing feeds – I take a monthly backup (read: whenever I remember) of the OPML so I don’t lose out on the URLs. Wise thing to do – backups. Especially if you haven’t yet standardized on a feedreader. And then of course, if I don’t go to a folder for a while, I just go ahead and delete it. Because if I am not reading it regularily, it probably means I am not going to read it in the future as well.

  37. Dharmesh,

    That’s something that FeedDemon does (track your opens and clicks) and it’s one of the more helpful things to look at, because it helps keep you on track as far as the number of feeds you’re subscribed to. Good call.

  38. Dharmesh,

    That’s something that FeedDemon does (track your opens and clicks) and it’s one of the more helpful things to look at, because it helps keep you on track as far as the number of feeds you’re subscribed to. Good call.

  39. Dharmesh,

    That’s something that FeedDemon does (track your opens and clicks) and it’s one of the more helpful things to look at, because it helps keep you on track as far as the number of feeds you’re subscribed to. Good call.

  40. Scoble, what is your NewsGator OPML url? If I know the OPML url I can easily import it. Mine is:
    http://services.newsgator.com/ngws/svc/opml.aspx?uid=65123&mid=1 To enable this, go to http://www.newsgator.com/ngs/subscriber/Machines.aspx and click on http://www.newsgator.com/ngs/subscriber/OpmlUrl.aspx?mid=1.

    Oh, and my super-geeky feed is http://spaces.msn.com/daniellarson. It’s mainly on development topics inclusing SharePoint, and occasionally development fun at NewsGator.

  41. Scoble, what is your NewsGator OPML url? If I know the OPML url I can easily import it. Mine is:
    http://services.newsgator.com/ngws/svc/opml.aspx?uid=65123&mid=1 To enable this, go to http://www.newsgator.com/ngs/subscriber/Machines.aspx and click on http://www.newsgator.com/ngs/subscriber/OpmlUrl.aspx?mid=1.

    Oh, and my super-geeky feed is http://spaces.msn.com/daniellarson. It’s mainly on development topics inclusing SharePoint, and occasionally development fun at NewsGator.

  42. Scoble, what is your NewsGator OPML url? If I know the OPML url I can easily import it. Mine is:
    http://services.newsgator.com/ngws/svc/opml.aspx?uid=65123&mid=1 To enable this, go to http://www.newsgator.com/ngs/subscriber/Machines.aspx and click on http://www.newsgator.com/ngs/subscriber/OpmlUrl.aspx?mid=1.

    Oh, and my super-geeky feed is http://spaces.msn.com/daniellarson. It’s mainly on development topics inclusing SharePoint, and occasionally development fun at NewsGator.

  43. The Power of OPML Sharing

    If you’ve been tuning into the blogosphere 2.0 for the past 20 hours, you probably will be seeing one phrase/service-name all around you and it’s absolutely hot now. When I say hot, I mean it, with a big capital “H”. And that is…