A stinky situation

No, this situation isn't about sitting with my mom this Mother's day.

You see, my mom shared one thing with me: the love of the outdoors. So, since Maryam had to go home today I wanted to make sure she experienced Yellowstone National Park.

So, yesterday we drove into the park. She was amazed. Couldn't believe that wildlife would walk within yards of people. I took her to Mammoth Hotsprings. My mom had taken me there a few times before.

Norris Geysers

Eventually we got to Norris Geysers. It smells there. Really.

Think about what would happen if 100 people would fart in an elevator. That comes close to the smell you'll experience at Norris and other places in Yellowstone.

See, the hot water that comes out of the ground brings with it Hydrogen Sulfide. It smells. Like rotten eggs. Or farts.

Norris is one of those places you'll probably see on Discovery Channel. If you have an HDTV I'm sure it'll be pretty interesting to watch, but HDTV won't bring you that smell. It must be experienced.

Norris geyser water

Why go there? Well, the geyers are interesting to watch. And the colors that form in the water streaming from the geyers are brilliant. My little cell phone camera doesn't do justice.

It seemed to be a good place to spend the afternoon. The only thing really smelly about it was my mom wasn't there. I might go back this week and sit on this bench and take it all in again.

My mom loved this place. She lived only an hour away.

I wish you all could experience the smell without experiencing the stinky situation. Heck, I wish that for myself.

Oh, by the way, Eric Rice wrote a beautiful thing about mothers this morning. He wrote "And never has it been so worth it to cry this much before noon."

P.S., my mom is doing as well as can be. She is a bit more alert. She recognizes people as they walk in (she has SO MANY friends here). Her sister arrived last night and they have had some very touching moments together. My mom strokes her hair and looks at her. Unfortunately there's not much else of my mom there to connect with. Funny thing, she picked up my business card and stared at it for quite a while. Ever since then we've brought her pictures and other things to look at.

As for me, it's a tough thing to go through. But, I'm trying to see the good parts in it and there are many. Even though it indeed, is a stinky situation. Much like the color in the geyser water below the smell.

26 thoughts on “A stinky situation

  1. I’m 30 years old and have yet to actually go and see Yellowstone myself. I’ve always wanted to even as a little kid. Maybe its time I do that and bring my mother and father with me.

  2. I’m 30 years old and have yet to actually go and see Yellowstone myself. I’ve always wanted to even as a little kid. Maybe its time I do that and bring my mother and father with me.

  3. Boy that is a stinking place. You think that they’d do something about it. And all that buffalo poop lying around – jeez! I think that we should have the park circus put on some more janitors and clean up the place. Maybe they could invent some scrubbers for the stink. Soon the place will be as wild as DisneyWorld. Come back when it gets to that stage and you can enjoy it from your belching motor home!

  4. Boy that is a stinking place. You think that they’d do something about it. And all that buffalo poop lying around – jeez! I think that we should have the park circus put on some more janitors and clean up the place. Maybe they could invent some scrubbers for the stink. Soon the place will be as wild as DisneyWorld. Come back when it gets to that stage and you can enjoy it from your belching motor home!

  5. I’m so sorry for your mom and so happy for the rest of us. Since you had such a stinking time, you’ll probably not return. One more bit of cultural pollution removed from Yellowstone.

  6. I’m so sorry for your mom and so happy for the rest of us. Since you had such a stinking time, you’ll probably not return. One more bit of cultural pollution removed from Yellowstone.

  7. The whole town of Rotarua in New Zealand smells like rotten eggs and the sheep on the sides of the old volcanos look like they have been steamed cleaned .

    Hope your Mum is ok Mate ,on this Mothers Day

  8. The whole town of Rotarua in New Zealand smells like rotten eggs and the sheep on the sides of the old volcanos look like they have been steamed cleaned .

    Hope your Mum is ok Mate ,on this Mothers Day

  9. Good for you for finding some joy showing Maryam Yellowstone. It is hard but necessary to keep living even when someone is dying.

    Six years ago, my grandmother (with whom I was very close) died three weeks before my son was born. She’d had a stroke and seemed to be recovering and then she had another at rehab and went into a coma.

    I was so pissed that she was taken before she could meet my son in any way other than the sonagram. But my stepdaughter had organized a surprise baby shower (against my wishes mind you) coincidentally on the day she died. They called all the non-family members and told them the shower was off, but they went ahead and held the shower for the family. And it helped everyone, to be doing something with joy, to be welcoming my soon-to-be-born son into the family.

    We gave him her maiden name as a second middle name in her honor.

    God bless you all,and know that many are thinking of you.

  10. Good for you for finding some joy showing Maryam Yellowstone. It is hard but necessary to keep living even when someone is dying.

    Six years ago, my grandmother (with whom I was very close) died three weeks before my son was born. She’d had a stroke and seemed to be recovering and then she had another at rehab and went into a coma.

    I was so pissed that she was taken before she could meet my son in any way other than the sonagram. But my stepdaughter had organized a surprise baby shower (against my wishes mind you) coincidentally on the day she died. They called all the non-family members and told them the shower was off, but they went ahead and held the shower for the family. And it helped everyone, to be doing something with joy, to be welcoming my soon-to-be-born son into the family.

    We gave him her maiden name as a second middle name in her honor.

    God bless you all,and know that many are thinking of you.

  11. Robert– I’d like to share this article with you that I wrote for Mother’s Day several years ago when there was no way to communicate with my family in Iraq. Communication is available today but very costy, so I still don’t get to talk to my mom as often as I would like to. Amyitis

    MOTHER’S DAY

    Mother’s Day has gone by and once again nearly everyone who has a mother has made the annual phone call or visit with her. Most people do this simply because it is a tradition, not because they feel a pressing desire to talk with their mother. Imagine what it would be like if you could not talk to your mother, or even send a card. What if you had no idea when you might ever talk to her again, or if you’d ever even see her. Perhaps things might be different. For me, they are.
    I remember the many things my mother told me to do and the many things she told me never to do, and when I was young, I know that little of this meant much to me at all. Like all kids, I played the rebel and did what I wanted, knowing full well that I was the wisest woman in the house and that I knew what was best for me. When my mother told me to make my bed every day before I went out, I thought it was foolish. Why should I go to all the effort to make a bed that I was coming back to later that day? It wasn’t like someone else was going to use my bed; I mean, it was mine. But now, as I fluff the pillows and neatly smooth the sheets, I laugh to myself remembering my mother’s wisdom and can only hope that one day I have a chance to be in her home again so that she can see me doing the very thing she always told me to do.

    Some things that she taught me, I always did, not really because I knew why, or even cared, but merely because she yelled at me enough that it was easier to just do what she said than to defy her. Even to this day, for reasons that seem to mystify and stump those around me, I still throw out without a second thought any food or medicine that drops on the floor. Some people might pick up the aspirin and just blow off any dust, but I am unable to do this, however irrational it may sometimes seem.

    In our kitchen my mother did her best to try and cultivate in me an interest in cooking. She would always require my assistance with her cooking, but I never found anything interesting about it. I would help her, but at the same time I would do my best to let her know that this was the last time I wanted to help out. I would stare at the clock and show her as best I could how much I hated kitchen work. I knew that cooking would never be a part of my life. Today I love every new appliance I get and I spend more time in the kitchen than seems possible. I try to recall every recipe that my mother ever taught me and to recreate all the meals that I loved as a child. I doubt she would believe it without seeing it with her own eyes.

    Though I cannot speak to her or even send her a card, the values she taught me will always remain. She taught me that getting a good education is one of the most important necessities if one is to be truly independent and fulfilled. She taught me to respect the world around me and to always show my best side to everyone, no matter how they might treat me. She instilled in me a kindness for those who have little, because one never knows when one might join their ranks. But the thing I learned best from her is something that she never made an effort to actually teach me. She was the rock upon which my family was built, and nothing — neither war, terror, sadness nor ill fortune — could break her. And so as long as she remained, so did we.

    Mother’s Day has come and gone, at least according to the calendar, but for me, every day is Mother’s Day. She is with me in more ways than I can ever know and if I were able to be able to thank her for everything she has given me, even that many days would not be enough.

  12. Robert– I’d like to share this article with you that I wrote for Mother’s Day several years ago when there was no way to communicate with my family in Iraq. Communication is available today but very costy, so I still don’t get to talk to my mom as often as I would like to. Amyitis

    MOTHER’S DAY

    Mother’s Day has gone by and once again nearly everyone who has a mother has made the annual phone call or visit with her. Most people do this simply because it is a tradition, not because they feel a pressing desire to talk with their mother. Imagine what it would be like if you could not talk to your mother, or even send a card. What if you had no idea when you might ever talk to her again, or if you’d ever even see her. Perhaps things might be different. For me, they are.
    I remember the many things my mother told me to do and the many things she told me never to do, and when I was young, I know that little of this meant much to me at all. Like all kids, I played the rebel and did what I wanted, knowing full well that I was the wisest woman in the house and that I knew what was best for me. When my mother told me to make my bed every day before I went out, I thought it was foolish. Why should I go to all the effort to make a bed that I was coming back to later that day? It wasn’t like someone else was going to use my bed; I mean, it was mine. But now, as I fluff the pillows and neatly smooth the sheets, I laugh to myself remembering my mother’s wisdom and can only hope that one day I have a chance to be in her home again so that she can see me doing the very thing she always told me to do.

    Some things that she taught me, I always did, not really because I knew why, or even cared, but merely because she yelled at me enough that it was easier to just do what she said than to defy her. Even to this day, for reasons that seem to mystify and stump those around me, I still throw out without a second thought any food or medicine that drops on the floor. Some people might pick up the aspirin and just blow off any dust, but I am unable to do this, however irrational it may sometimes seem.

    In our kitchen my mother did her best to try and cultivate in me an interest in cooking. She would always require my assistance with her cooking, but I never found anything interesting about it. I would help her, but at the same time I would do my best to let her know that this was the last time I wanted to help out. I would stare at the clock and show her as best I could how much I hated kitchen work. I knew that cooking would never be a part of my life. Today I love every new appliance I get and I spend more time in the kitchen than seems possible. I try to recall every recipe that my mother ever taught me and to recreate all the meals that I loved as a child. I doubt she would believe it without seeing it with her own eyes.

    Though I cannot speak to her or even send her a card, the values she taught me will always remain. She taught me that getting a good education is one of the most important necessities if one is to be truly independent and fulfilled. She taught me to respect the world around me and to always show my best side to everyone, no matter how they might treat me. She instilled in me a kindness for those who have little, because one never knows when one might join their ranks. But the thing I learned best from her is something that she never made an effort to actually teach me. She was the rock upon which my family was built, and nothing — neither war, terror, sadness nor ill fortune — could break her. And so as long as she remained, so did we.

    Mother’s Day has come and gone, at least according to the calendar, but for me, every day is Mother’s Day. She is with me in more ways than I can ever know and if I were able to be able to thank her for everything she has given me, even that many days would not be enough.

  13. Hi Scob: I have never commented over here on your blog before, and after reading your post about your mom I had to. I am sorry for what you are going through, and I don’t know what I would do without my mom, I just have no idea. It’s sometimes hard to hold up tear shields…I can’t believe you’re blogging through this time, I am not sure If I would be able to breathe very well in your situation.

    Looking at your day out there though looks awesome, what a great place..Best of luck – I extend my best wishes from all of us here at the Global Geek Podcast !

    -Sebastian Prooth SEBRT.COM

  14. Hi Scob: I have never commented over here on your blog before, and after reading your post about your mom I had to. I am sorry for what you are going through, and I don’t know what I would do without my mom, I just have no idea. It’s sometimes hard to hold up tear shields…I can’t believe you’re blogging through this time, I am not sure If I would be able to breathe very well in your situation.

    Looking at your day out there though looks awesome, what a great place..Best of luck – I extend my best wishes from all of us here at the Global Geek Podcast !

    -Sebastian Prooth SEBRT.COM

  15. It Sounds, I mean it smells like a nice place to visit, wouldn’t mind visiting it someday, especially to see the geysers! :)

    P.S. Glad to hear your mum is doing as well as well can be.

  16. It Sounds, I mean it smells like a nice place to visit, wouldn’t mind visiting it someday, especially to see the geysers! :)

    P.S. Glad to hear your mum is doing as well as well can be.

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