PR done badly

It's amazing how many product pitches I've received in the past few days. Even in phone calls. Do they not read my blog? Do they have no clue what's happened in my life in the past five days?

Apparently not.

I'm sad I'm not going to Syndicate. I'd like to ask Richard Edelman about why PR folks are sometimes so clueless.

Now, keep in mind, not all are.

Frank Shaw, Vice President of Waggener Edstrom, demonstrated his clued-in behavior by sending me a very nice note. Not that he needed to demonstrate that again. He's proven that he is clued in many, many times before. I guess that's how you get to be vice president at a major PR firm instead of just a lackey paid to smile-and-dial.

But, in today's world of search engines like Google, Yahoo, MSN, Technorati, Feedster, and others, it just isn't good to be clued out.

I don't know what to do about it. Other than to turn down free stuff. And not write about such jerks' products or companies. It's amazing how much free stuff I've been offered since I told the world I'm not going to accept it anymore.

The good PR folks can call me anytime. After all, I wrote a book with one. Oh, wait, he doesn't like being called a PR guy. Says he's retired from that business. Oh, yeah, Shel, you're the best, and you just don't wanna be associated with the bad ones. Me neither.

Boy, has PR changed since we have the ability to share our lives in real time with the world? You bet it has.

You also now understand how Microsoft got such bad PR. We forgot that PR is done one relationship at a time. I wonder now how many press releases we sent to journalists who were sitting with mothers who were dying?

How is blogging changing PR? One mother at a time. Heh!

63 thoughts on “PR done badly

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  6. Unlike many of the commenters here, I think the PR industry needs a real wake up. I used to be a full-time freelance journalist and still dabble. I used to get some incredibly thoughtless, intrusive, rude, aggressive pitches from PR companies and worse. It would be very easy and tempting to deal with this by being comprehensively rude back. Ignoring people, hanging up the phone and so on. The problem is, as Robert says, you want to build relationships and you don’t want to give up your own basic good manners regardless of what (some) other people do. This is the central dilemma in my experience and one of the reasons why I do so much less magazine journalism these days. Here is one of many posts on my blogs about the PR industry: Top ten lies of PR companies: http://www.badlanguage.net/?p=17

  7. Unlike many of the commenters here, I think the PR industry needs a real wake up. I used to be a full-time freelance journalist and still dabble. I used to get some incredibly thoughtless, intrusive, rude, aggressive pitches from PR companies and worse. It would be very easy and tempting to deal with this by being comprehensively rude back. Ignoring people, hanging up the phone and so on. The problem is, as Robert says, you want to build relationships and you don’t want to give up your own basic good manners regardless of what (some) other people do. This is the central dilemma in my experience and one of the reasons why I do so much less magazine journalism these days. Here is one of many posts on my blogs about the PR industry: Top ten lies of PR companies: http://www.badlanguage.net/?p=17

  8. My notes from Steve Rubels’s keynote “Conversation” Tuesday at the Toronto mesh conference (Steve joined Edelman a few months ago):
    - now the PR professional needs to know how to interact with people as individuals
    - create a win-win: how do I hope that both parties have a success?
    - clients get it when they are ready to get into a “conversation”
    - new model: further the conversation

    My conclusion: blogging is about dialogues and, dare I say, ‘naked’ conversations across your community (virtual or real). “I talk, you listen” is not an option. And yet, it’s a reflection of the same “old” sales training: know your customer (participant).

  9. My notes from Steve Rubels’s keynote “Conversation” Tuesday at the Toronto mesh conference (Steve joined Edelman a few months ago):
    - now the PR professional needs to know how to interact with people as individuals
    - create a win-win: how do I hope that both parties have a success?
    - clients get it when they are ready to get into a “conversation”
    - new model: further the conversation

    My conclusion: blogging is about dialogues and, dare I say, ‘naked’ conversations across your community (virtual or real). “I talk, you listen” is not an option. And yet, it’s a reflection of the same “old” sales training: know your customer (participant).

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