A blog is not a blog unless…

Dwight Silverman, of the Houston Chronicle, says shame on Microsoft for calling the publishing mechanism inside the new URGE music service and Windows Media Player 11 (which otherwise is getting good reviews around blogs this morning) "blogs."

I agree with Dwight.

What made blogging better than Web sites? Five things.

1) Ease of publishing.
2) Discoverability. (Pings weblogs.com or technorati or another ping server).
3) Conversationality. (Trackbacks or as-they-happen referer logs, or now being part of Technorati and other blog search engines).
4) Linkability. (All posts should have permalinks).
5) Syndicatability. (All content should be available in RSS feeds).

If you don't have those five, you shouldn't call your stuff a blog. Especially if I can't link to it from here.

74 thoughts on “A blog is not a blog unless…

  1. i understand what you mean, but there are sites that are generally considered blogs because they are updated frequently, have content displayed in reverse chronological order, but have no RSS, no permalinks, and no “leave a comment” spaces. Karen Cheng’s blog for example.

  2. i understand what you mean, but there are sites that are generally considered blogs because they are updated frequently, have content displayed in reverse chronological order, but have no RSS, no permalinks, and no “leave a comment” spaces. Karen Cheng’s blog for example.

  3. Please I was “blogging” before the word even existed. You can’t really define it with requirements. That’s like Microsoft saying an ultra-mobile PC isn’t a “UMPC” unless it does x, y, and z. :)

  4. Please I was “blogging” before the word even existed. You can’t really define it with requirements. That’s like Microsoft saying an ultra-mobile PC isn’t a “UMPC” unless it does x, y, and z. :)

  5. In my innoncence as a new blogger I’ve just started a similar topic about trying to define what a blog is.

    I don’t think a general definition of a blog can be reduced to a simple list like this. Although the term has been around a while, it’s only just beginning to mature. It’s in an inchoate state as l.lee.lowe put it.

    In other words the art and science of blogging is only now getting into its infancy, we can try and predict what it will look like when it grows up, but we can’t pin it down yet.

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