No work blogging allowed at many co’s, NYT says

There's lots of companies that don't allow blogging, the New York Times reports today.

That's cool. I hope none of my competitors allow their employees to blog. Why? You'd be amazed at the number of job seekers we get simply because we blog openly and, even report that there's dirt under the rug over in the corner.

Yeah, it drives our PR teams nuts, but that's why they earn the big bucks! :-)

I'd never work at a place that didn't let me have open and frank conversations with my customers. That just seems nutty to me. How about you?

20 thoughts on “No work blogging allowed at many co’s, NYT says

  1. Robert,

    I saw the NYT article and jumped on over here to see if you had posted on it and was glad to see you had.

    I am close to finishing Naked Conversations and have been inspired by it. I have this idea in my head for a new business / social / community site with blogging as its foundational idea. I don’t know if I have the wherewithal to actually do it.

    Anyway, all of ya’ll (especially The NYT) should read Naked Conversations if you want to get a great perspective on Business blogging.

    FYI, I have never met Robert Scoble (this is even my first comment on his blog) and he did not ask for this endoresement of his book.

    scott

    ScottSp@gmail.com

  2. Robert,

    I saw the NYT article and jumped on over here to see if you had posted on it and was glad to see you had.

    I am close to finishing Naked Conversations and have been inspired by it. I have this idea in my head for a new business / social / community site with blogging as its foundational idea. I don’t know if I have the wherewithal to actually do it.

    Anyway, all of ya’ll (especially The NYT) should read Naked Conversations if you want to get a great perspective on Business blogging.

    FYI, I have never met Robert Scoble (this is even my first comment on his blog) and he did not ask for this endoresement of his book.

    scott

    ScottSp@gmail.com

  3. I couldn’t agree with you more Robert. Being heavily into blogging, my co-directors think I am into some sort of minority geek fad which won’t catch on.

    But when they see the volumes of traffic I achieve and my google page rank of 4 (ok, not a load to boast about I appreciate) achieved within 4 weeks of starting, they look upon it in a whole different light (I mean which small startup e-commerce site wouldn’t want a half-decent page rank within a month anyway?)

    That said, they still DON’T get it and still WON’T understand how it can be of benefit.

    How can blogging reach the unaware? Is the solution to allow EVERYBODY to do it?

    Is the no-blogging rule something that will only be permitted if the deciision makers are convince? If so, what will it take?

  4. I couldn’t agree with you more Robert. Being heavily into blogging, my co-directors think I am into some sort of minority geek fad which won’t catch on.

    But when they see the volumes of traffic I achieve and my google page rank of 4 (ok, not a load to boast about I appreciate) achieved within 4 weeks of starting, they look upon it in a whole different light (I mean which small startup e-commerce site wouldn’t want a half-decent page rank within a month anyway?)

    That said, they still DON’T get it and still WON’T understand how it can be of benefit.

    How can blogging reach the unaware? Is the solution to allow EVERYBODY to do it?

    Is the no-blogging rule something that will only be permitted if the deciision makers are convince? If so, what will it take?

  5. Hi Robert,

    I completely agree with you! In fact, I just wrote about this (before I saw your entry) and noted that I will not work at company that doesnt allow me to blog.

    As an intern, blogging has helped me tremendously especially with transitioning to the workforce, networking, and keep track of everything that I learn.

    Of course interns should not talk about confidential stuff, but taking away my tool would not be smart. I am trying to seek other intern bloggers and build a network in the blogosphere…I strongly believe I and many others can help new generations transition to the workforce.

    -Chris

  6. Hi Robert,

    I completely agree with you! In fact, I just wrote about this (before I saw your entry) and noted that I will not work at company that doesnt allow me to blog.

    As an intern, blogging has helped me tremendously especially with transitioning to the workforce, networking, and keep track of everything that I learn.

    Of course interns should not talk about confidential stuff, but taking away my tool would not be smart. I am trying to seek other intern bloggers and build a network in the blogosphere…I strongly believe I and many others can help new generations transition to the workforce.

    -Chris

  7. DMAD: Absolutely NOT true. In many companies blogging ANYTHING is a fireable offense. I’ve talked with many HR and PR teams and they can’t believe that we’re allowed to do what we’re doing at Microsoft.

  8. DMAD: Absolutely NOT true. In many companies blogging ANYTHING is a fireable offense. I’ve talked with many HR and PR teams and they can’t believe that we’re allowed to do what we’re doing at Microsoft.

  9. But Robert, you’ve said REPEATEDLY, that blogging is not part of your job. So, in your case MS is neutral on your blogging. Up to now, they apparently don’t really care one way or the other. I’d be curious to know how many MS employees have blogging as one of their major responsibilities on behalf of the company. Sure, MS could easily clamp down on you. But at this point, based on what you’ve said about your job, apparently as long as it doesn’t interfer with what they pay you to do (whatever that is) they neither encourage nor discourage it.

  10. But Robert, you’ve said REPEATEDLY, that blogging is not part of your job. So, in your case MS is neutral on your blogging. Up to now, they apparently don’t really care one way or the other. I’d be curious to know how many MS employees have blogging as one of their major responsibilities on behalf of the company. Sure, MS could easily clamp down on you. But at this point, based on what you’ve said about your job, apparently as long as it doesn’t interfer with what they pay you to do (whatever that is) they neither encourage nor discourage it.

  11. I agree completely. In my personal experience customers are more comfortable around those that they can associate with on a “people” level.

    I know personally I hate dealing with anyone that is “borg” like. The days of “pulling the wool” over a customers eyes in long gone – people respect open and honest conversations.

    Sometimes it’s nice to know we all wait in the same line to get our cool new gadgets just like we all burn our toast the same way.

    To ignore blogs at this stage in the game would be in my opinion the same as ignoring the world news.

  12. I agree completely. In my personal experience customers are more comfortable around those that they can associate with on a “people” level.

    I know personally I hate dealing with anyone that is “borg” like. The days of “pulling the wool” over a customers eyes in long gone – people respect open and honest conversations.

    Sometimes it’s nice to know we all wait in the same line to get our cool new gadgets just like we all burn our toast the same way.

    To ignore blogs at this stage in the game would be in my opinion the same as ignoring the world news.

  13. but off course its NYT and its an MSM dude !!

    They dont want people to blog –whether its at work or off work.. !!

    Dont you think they have vested interests ??

  14. but off course its NYT and its an MSM dude !!

    They dont want people to blog –whether its at work or off work.. !!

    Dont you think they have vested interests ??

  15. I sort of understand. Not all employees in fact love the brand they have to flog. They just have a job, then go home. But I’d sure love to see some European companies join in (in fact i’d like to see some more Europeans blog at all, but that’s another issue).

  16. I sort of understand. Not all employees in fact love the brand they have to flog. They just have a job, then go home. But I’d sure love to see some European companies join in (in fact i’d like to see some more Europeans blog at all, but that’s another issue).

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