Peter says podcasting is inefficient

Peter Davis says: "In the time I can listen to an average podcast, I could have caught up on my 50 favorite blogs, or read a chapter in a book, or read the latest issue of Red Herring magazine."

You might be shocked to hear me say this, but Peter is right.

So, why am I joining a podcasting company if Peter is right? Cause I'd love Peter to explain to me how he reads RSS when he's driving. Or, as someone told me recently, while walking in the Scottish Highlands.

Or, try exercising while reading a Tablet PC. I've tried, it doesn't work for me.

Walking around town with my SmartPhone out and reading it gets me branded a freak.

See, what you're missing is podcasting opens up a new usage model that text can't serve.

How about video? Here, let me show you Halo 3. Well, not. It's top secret and they won't let me into see that. Smart people over at Bungie. Heheh. But, let's say it was being released today. What would be better? A 10,000 word essay on what's new? Or one minute of video showing you the new features?

When I hang out with developers they tell me "use the right tool for the job." If you want to communicate with other people text will do the job more times than not. But, if you want to reach people where they are likely to use an iPod then audio is better. If you have something visual, photos or video is better.

Imagine that you read the report of the Hindenberg disaster instead of listened to it (Real Media player required). Some things need to be heard.

Comments

  1. Exactly! Reading stuff through a news aggregator is fine, if you have access to a PC and a net connection most of the time. I have a field job that requires I go to customer sites and I live in a rather small city. That means no net access (wifi hotspots are nearly impossible to find and there’s no EVDO service out here) and no PC much of the day unless I want to pull the car over to the side of the road. Podcasts help me stay informed despite my less wired life.

  2. Exactly! Reading stuff through a news aggregator is fine, if you have access to a PC and a net connection most of the time. I have a field job that requires I go to customer sites and I live in a rather small city. That means no net access (wifi hotspots are nearly impossible to find and there’s no EVDO service out here) and no PC much of the day unless I want to pull the car over to the side of the road. Podcasts help me stay informed despite my less wired life.

  3. I’ve often expressed my opinion that the podcast phenomenon depends entirely on commuting. People who commute to work (car, bus, train, whatever) love podcasts, and people like me who work at home don’t see the point of them at all.

    There are plenty of people commuting, so I don’t think you’re wrong to join a podcast company…

    The only people who are wrong are those that think podcasting will REPLACE weblogs. Just like you said, use the right tool for the job.

    P.S. If I were walking in the scottish highlands I’d be enjoying the sights and sounds… Not listening to a podcast. :)

  4. I’ve often expressed my opinion that the podcast phenomenon depends entirely on commuting. People who commute to work (car, bus, train, whatever) love podcasts, and people like me who work at home don’t see the point of them at all.

    There are plenty of people commuting, so I don’t think you’re wrong to join a podcast company…

    The only people who are wrong are those that think podcasting will REPLACE weblogs. Just like you said, use the right tool for the job.

    P.S. If I were walking in the scottish highlands I’d be enjoying the sights and sounds… Not listening to a podcast. :)

  5. Michael: well, the guy who told me that lives there. It’d be like me listening to podcasts on the beach in Half Moon Bay. It’s stunningly beautiful there (come and visit!) but I do my best thinking when I’m in such an environment so that’s when I listen to smart people telling me interesting things.

  6. Michael: well, the guy who told me that lives there. It’d be like me listening to podcasts on the beach in Half Moon Bay. It’s stunningly beautiful there (come and visit!) but I do my best thinking when I’m in such an environment so that’s when I listen to smart people telling me interesting things.

  7. Gotta say you’re right. I wish I had more time to listen to podcasts, but those times when I take my dog for an hour long walk, I love listening to them. It’s like Tivo for my ears…my stuff when I want it. Long plane trips too.

  8. Gotta say you’re right. I wish I had more time to listen to podcasts, but those times when I take my dog for an hour long walk, I love listening to them. It’s like Tivo for my ears…my stuff when I want it. Long plane trips too.

  9. Ooh, yeah…Robert, now that your going to be involved in video podcasting too, let me make my pitch. Each week I download the .wmv version of the Digg show and I watch it via my XBox 360 Media Center extender. It’s so great to watch that show on a big-screen TV, even if it’s not High-Def. Please push the folks at PodTech (and others) for more .wmv versions of video podcasts.

    I think there’d be a good market there for Xbox 360 users like me. Best of luck in the new job too!

  10. Ooh, yeah…Robert, now that your going to be involved in video podcasting too, let me make my pitch. Each week I download the .wmv version of the Digg show and I watch it via my XBox 360 Media Center extender. It’s so great to watch that show on a big-screen TV, even if it’s not High-Def. Please push the folks at PodTech (and others) for more .wmv versions of video podcasts.

    I think there’d be a good market there for Xbox 360 users like me. Best of luck in the new job too!

  11. Also reading takes effort and concentration, audio is passive, subliminal. I hear people are now fed information in short little clips, a result of our decreasing ability to concentrate for anything other than short periods. You can sign your subconcious over to the podcast.

  12. Also reading takes effort and concentration, audio is passive, subliminal. I hear people are now fed information in short little clips, a result of our decreasing ability to concentrate for anything other than short periods. You can sign your subconcious over to the podcast.

  13. Well, I may be a bit out of it, my commute involves a set of stairs and walking to the room on the other end of my kitchen. If I’m excercising indoors, I watch tv, if I excercise outdoors, I enjoy the sights and sounds of nature. When I’m driving, my four-year-old in the back seat generally drowns out the sounds of anything resembling a podcast. I do wish you well, and hope your service finds a successful market, but I’m just not seeing it.

  14. Well, I may be a bit out of it, my commute involves a set of stairs and walking to the room on the other end of my kitchen. If I’m excercising indoors, I watch tv, if I excercise outdoors, I enjoy the sights and sounds of nature. When I’m driving, my four-year-old in the back seat generally drowns out the sounds of anything resembling a podcast. I do wish you well, and hope your service finds a successful market, but I’m just not seeing it.

  15. One other area poscasts stand out is language. My native tounge is Malayalam. Although I speak it fluently, I’m not good at reading it. Now I can keep upto date with news and views from my home state of Kerala via podcasts, earlier I had to depend on someone reading it out to me. Since reading is not involved, Podcasts are good for visually challenged people too.

  16. One other area poscasts stand out is language. My native tounge is Malayalam. Although I speak it fluently, I’m not good at reading it. Now I can keep upto date with news and views from my home state of Kerala via podcasts, earlier I had to depend on someone reading it out to me. Since reading is not involved, Podcasts are good for visually challenged people too.

  17. Podcasting is really handy when I’m working, instead of listening to music sometimes I find its convenient to listen to an available podcast.

    I’m a bit confused how anyone could not see the use of podcasting…

    Similarly last year at the University of Tasmania a senior lecturer in Information Systems, one who is on the state government board here for innovative technology grants, bailed me up in his office asking

    “I don’t get this RSS thing, I just dont get it. What’s the point???”

  18. Podcasting is really handy when I’m working, instead of listening to music sometimes I find its convenient to listen to an available podcast.

    I’m a bit confused how anyone could not see the use of podcasting…

    Similarly last year at the University of Tasmania a senior lecturer in Information Systems, one who is on the state government board here for innovative technology grants, bailed me up in his office asking

    “I don’t get this RSS thing, I just dont get it. What’s the point???”

  19. Quite right I often listen to TWIT when i’me doing by boring scut work if somthing interesting comes up I can go to the site under discussino

  20. Podcasting is inefficient compared to text but for me it’s like “Radio Tivo”. I love listening to radio while working, or doing boring chores, but cant choose what I hear or when it’s broadcast. Podcasting means I can.

  21. Podcasting is inefficient compared to text but for me it’s like “Radio Tivo”. I love listening to radio while working, or doing boring chores, but cant choose what I hear or when it’s broadcast. Podcasting means I can.

  22. He’s wrong. You can’t read blogs or books on a bike or while doing the dishes, or vacuuming, or working out. Podcasting is efficient because it uses time in which you can’t do anything else.

  23. He’s wrong. You can’t read blogs or books on a bike or while doing the dishes, or vacuuming, or working out. Podcasting is efficient because it uses time in which you can’t do anything else.

  24. [...] Ex-Microsoft-evangelist Robert Scoble reageert op de stelling dat podcasting, het luisteren naar gedownloade audiobestanden dus, inefficiënt is omdat je in dezelfde tijd veel meer informatie tot je kunt nemen door te lezen. Scoble zegt: ‘use the right tool for the job, […] some things need to be heard.‘ Helemaal waar. Los daarvan is podcasting juist extreem efficiënt: je kunt naar podcasts luisteren tijdens het fietsen, fitnessen, hardlopen, stofzuigen, boodschappen doen, reizen, autorijden en koken. Om een paar dingen te noemen. Je kunt naar podcasts luisteren op momenten dat je niet naar beeldschermen of papieren letters kunt staren, maar toch genoeg aandacht over hebt voor kwaliteitsentertainment of boeiende verhalen. Ook voor verhalen die je later op de dag vervolgens niet in papieren vorm hoeft te lezen – dat scheelt dus ook weer tijd. Er is één klein technisch nadeel aan podcasten met iTunes en een iPod. Wanneer ik mijn iPod aansluit, gebeuren de volgende dingen: – iTunes wordt opgestart – iTunes gaat mijn iPod updaten met de reeds aanwezige, door iTunes gedownloade nieuwe podcasts – Binnen iTunes verschijnt intussen de melding: iPod wordt bijgewerkt. Niet loskoppelen – iTunes gaat kijken of er nieuwe podcasts kunnen worden gedownload – Mijn iPod is na een seconde of tien wel geupdated, en binnen iTunes verschijnt dan ook de melding: De iPod is bijgewerkt – Ondertussen is iTunes bezig met het downloaden van nieuwe podcastafleveringen. Wanneer dit is voltooid, staat bovenaan echter nog altijd de melding dat mijn iPod is bijgewerkt! Terwijl iTunes op dat moment al nieuwe afleveringen heeft klaarstaan die ik echter nog met een druk op de knop naar mijn iPod moet sturen. [...]

  25. There is a place for blogs, there is a place for podcast, there is a place for IRC and one for Second Life – and the other ones I am missing.

    Yes, a lot of people react strongly to not liking the audio they need to insist on how useless it is – probably to make the feeling go away that they notice there is something coming which they don’t understand – and it is going to be huge.

    Which is okay. They don’t need to. But if they want to play “i am so hip I do all the cool stuff” – well, then they need to engange in podcast too.

    Or gain enough self confidence and self reflectivness to be able to say “Yes, Podcasting is great – for others and I am happy for them. It is just not for me.”

  26. There is a place for blogs, there is a place for podcast, there is a place for IRC and one for Second Life – and the other ones I am missing.

    Yes, a lot of people react strongly to not liking the audio they need to insist on how useless it is – probably to make the feeling go away that they notice there is something coming which they don’t understand – and it is going to be huge.

    Which is okay. They don’t need to. But if they want to play “i am so hip I do all the cool stuff” – well, then they need to engange in podcast too.

    Or gain enough self confidence and self reflectivness to be able to say “Yes, Podcasting is great – for others and I am happy for them. It is just not for me.”

  27. Your point about Podcasting being a handy way to consume some time where reading is impratical is well taken. But Podcasters should also note that time is not without limits. I listen to the iPod in the car or while exercising. Knowing that I have X hours a week to listen to Podcasts, I have become VERY selective about what I listen to. Podcasts are going to have to get much, much better in my opinion in order to keep an audience. The homespun, “gosh gee-whiz look at us we have a Podcast where we talk about whatever pops into our heads” Podcasts are over. They got their 15 minutes in the spotlight. Now bring on the good (but brief) stuff.

  28. Your point about Podcasting being a handy way to consume some time where reading is impratical is well taken. But Podcasters should also note that time is not without limits. I listen to the iPod in the car or while exercising. Knowing that I have X hours a week to listen to Podcasts, I have become VERY selective about what I listen to. Podcasts are going to have to get much, much better in my opinion in order to keep an audience. The homespun, “gosh gee-whiz look at us we have a Podcast where we talk about whatever pops into our heads” Podcasts are over. They got their 15 minutes in the spotlight. Now bring on the good (but brief) stuff.

  29. Podcasting will take off after millions of people in third world can have better internet connection. In my country, podcasting has hardly any user base because of low internet speed.

  30. Podcasting will take off after millions of people in third world can have better internet connection. In my country, podcasting has hardly any user base because of low internet speed.

  31. Podcasting is good as an alternative. When it becomes the only way to get access to content, that content is pointless for people like me.

    Some would argue that the majority of content in podcasts is poor anyway and that I’m at an advantage for not having been exposed to it, but I would like to make that decision for myself.

    So those of you who do podcasts, make the content available to those that are not able to listen to it, or give up any pretence that this is the next wave.

  32. Podcasting is good as an alternative. When it becomes the only way to get access to content, that content is pointless for people like me.

    Some would argue that the majority of content in podcasts is poor anyway and that I’m at an advantage for not having been exposed to it, but I would like to make that decision for myself.

    So those of you who do podcasts, make the content available to those that are not able to listen to it, or give up any pretence that this is the next wave.

  33. I tried listening to some podcasts when I was catching the train to work. An hour and a half journey, with no net access, perfect for Podcasting?

    Well no. I found podcasts excrutiatingly boring to listen to while on the train. I was much happier listening to music and reading a book.

    It also required a lot more preparation. I had to download the podcasts and get them transferred to my mp3 player. Which I usually couldn’t be arsed doing.

    Until my mp3 player can connect to the internet and download podcasts itself (without an extra cost), I probably won’t bother with it. Most of the podcasts I have listened to, have been on my PC…..

    Podcasting is always going to ahvea smaller niche market than text RSS feeds.

  34. I tried listening to some podcasts when I was catching the train to work. An hour and a half journey, with no net access, perfect for Podcasting?

    Well no. I found podcasts excrutiatingly boring to listen to while on the train. I was much happier listening to music and reading a book.

    It also required a lot more preparation. I had to download the podcasts and get them transferred to my mp3 player. Which I usually couldn’t be arsed doing.

    Until my mp3 player can connect to the internet and download podcasts itself (without an extra cost), I probably won’t bother with it. Most of the podcasts I have listened to, have been on my PC…..

    Podcasting is always going to ahvea smaller niche market than text RSS feeds.

  35. I listen to my podcasts while I’m getting ready for work in the morning, cleaning my house, or while driving. I’ve found myself listening to podcasts on my iPod more than music. It’s an excellent way to get information during a period of time when you typically wouldn’t be able to.

  36. I listen to my podcasts while I’m getting ready for work in the morning, cleaning my house, or while driving. I’ve found myself listening to podcasts on my iPod more than music. It’s an excellent way to get information during a period of time when you typically wouldn’t be able to.

  37. I’ve never listened to a podcast and the few videos (mostly humor) that I’ve been sent have been watched with the audio muted. Why? I’m hearing impaired. I haven’t been able to understand electronic speech for about 10 years. If you don’t offer transcripts, you won’t get your message to me.

    I’m not alone with this handicap. AND, millions more will be having it due to hearing loss caused by the too loud music on your MP3 player, at concerts and sporting events, and from those damn boom boom cars that are annoying as hell. Enjoy the podcasts and videos while you can. Closed captions on TV and transcript wishes may be a fact of life for you too in the near future.

  38. I’ve never listened to a podcast and the few videos (mostly humor) that I’ve been sent have been watched with the audio muted. Why? I’m hearing impaired. I haven’t been able to understand electronic speech for about 10 years. If you don’t offer transcripts, you won’t get your message to me.

    I’m not alone with this handicap. AND, millions more will be having it due to hearing loss caused by the too loud music on your MP3 player, at concerts and sporting events, and from those damn boom boom cars that are annoying as hell. Enjoy the podcasts and videos while you can. Closed captions on TV and transcript wishes may be a fact of life for you too in the near future.

  39. I listen to podcasts while I’m reading my top 50 sites through aggregators, checking my email and doing everything else.

    Come on… anyone ever heard of multitasking. In fact, most people who listen to podcasts ARE doing something else while they’re listening, because the majority of people don’t listen to podcasts on portable media players, they listen directly on their PCs.

  40. I listen to podcasts while I’m reading my top 50 sites through aggregators, checking my email and doing everything else.

    Come on… anyone ever heard of multitasking. In fact, most people who listen to podcasts ARE doing something else while they’re listening, because the majority of people don’t listen to podcasts on portable media players, they listen directly on their PCs.

  41. This Peter guy is out to lunch — the only time I find podcasts least efficient that reading blogs is when I’m in front of a computer in the office. And guess what — that’s the time I should be reading and not listening.

    His complaint is like spoons are more efficient than forks as you can eat soup with them.

    There’s no way I could read on the bus into work, with all the jostling and all the talk going on around me. But put on some good earphones and Audible on my iPod and the 50 minute trip is bearable.

  42. This Peter guy is out to lunch — the only time I find podcasts least efficient that reading blogs is when I’m in front of a computer in the office. And guess what — that’s the time I should be reading and not listening.

    His complaint is like spoons are more efficient than forks as you can eat soup with them.

    There’s no way I could read on the bus into work, with all the jostling and all the talk going on around me. But put on some good earphones and Audible on my iPod and the 50 minute trip is bearable.

  43. Couple of other podcast modality benefits … multitasking. Even when at a PC I can do lots of work and listen to a podcast. I can’t read more than one thing at a time. Also, absorption … I retain information better listening then scanning text (could be just me). Group activities … I know a developer who puts his team in a room, closes the door, plays a relevant podcast and does a group brainstorm on it. He says if he sends out a document before the meeting, most people won’t have read it. By listening in a group, he knows the whole team is on the same page, and they get a discussion in real time on it. Podcasting is a strong business tool.

  44. Couple of other podcast modality benefits … multitasking. Even when at a PC I can do lots of work and listen to a podcast. I can’t read more than one thing at a time. Also, absorption … I retain information better listening then scanning text (could be just me). Group activities … I know a developer who puts his team in a room, closes the door, plays a relevant podcast and does a group brainstorm on it. He says if he sends out a document before the meeting, most people won’t have read it. By listening in a group, he knows the whole team is on the same page, and they get a discussion in real time on it. Podcasting is a strong business tool.

  45. I work at home, and I still use podcasts–at the gym, while I’m driving, and when I’m relaxing. I really don’t think it’s wise for a content publisher to ONLY offer podcasts–it makes the most sense to me to do a weekly summary podcast that boils down what’s happened in the text version over the past week. That would serve the additional purpose of luring in listeners who may not want to subscribe to and read yet another blog but want to keep up to date on what’s happening while they work out.

  46. I work at home, and I still use podcasts–at the gym, while I’m driving, and when I’m relaxing. I really don’t think it’s wise for a content publisher to ONLY offer podcasts–it makes the most sense to me to do a weekly summary podcast that boils down what’s happened in the text version over the past week. That would serve the additional purpose of luring in listeners who may not want to subscribe to and read yet another blog but want to keep up to date on what’s happening while they work out.

  47. Exactly!

    - Text requires your eyes’ attention and hand coordination.
    - Video requires your eyes’ and ears’ attention
    - Audio just needs your ears.

    : So you can get on with doing something else – like drive/code/work/farm/walk/etc/etc….

    and LEARN!

  48. Exactly!

    - Text requires your eyes’ attention and hand coordination.
    - Video requires your eyes’ and ears’ attention
    - Audio just needs your ears.

    : So you can get on with doing something else – like drive/code/work/farm/walk/etc/etc….

    and LEARN!

  49. La la la let’s play the medium-is-not-the-content game boys and girls, yes that’s right! Okay, your challenge…….. rewrite all the posts and comments and snarky, by doing the following things………..ready? GO!

    Replace ‘podcast’ with ‘radio’; replace ‘videoblog’ with TV; replace ‘blogs’ with newspaper…..

    Hi, hello, what up, zOMG. You watch stuff, you listen to stuff, you read stuff. And you do one or all of those where it makes sense or convenient. But i think that might be too obvious.

    /end ridiculously patronizing, sarcastic, yet, insightful comment.

  50. La la la let’s play the medium-is-not-the-content game boys and girls, yes that’s right! Okay, your challenge…….. rewrite all the posts and comments and snarky, by doing the following things………..ready? GO!

    Replace ‘podcast’ with ‘radio’; replace ‘videoblog’ with TV; replace ‘blogs’ with newspaper…..

    Hi, hello, what up, zOMG. You watch stuff, you listen to stuff, you read stuff. And you do one or all of those where it makes sense or convenient. But i think that might be too obvious.

    /end ridiculously patronizing, sarcastic, yet, insightful comment.

  51. reading is blogs are great but you are rigt about the times when you don’t have a computer to read them and i think listening to podcast are a better form of entertainment. I listen to a lot of podcast (mainly from the TWIT Network when im out and about but not when i am at a computer.

  52. reading is blogs are great but you are rigt about the times when you don’t have a computer to read them and i think listening to podcast are a better form of entertainment. I listen to a lot of podcast (mainly from the TWIT Network when im out and about but not when i am at a computer.

  53. a podcast is basically talk radio 2.0. so just insert podcasts in the place where you normally put in radio…

  54. a podcast is basically talk radio 2.0. so just insert podcasts in the place where you normally put in radio…

  55. My short list for why I listen to podcasts:

    1. Long commute. 2. I listen to talk radio. 3. I own an iPod. 4. I’m comfortable with technology.

    As far as I’m concerned if any one of these items weren’t part of my life I doubt I would listen to podcasts, but right now I’m addicted to them. The last 2 are pretty important because one has to be comfortable with the concept of downloading files and pushing to the iPod regularly, which I’m afraid is not an easy concept for some. Some people just digitize their whole music collection, push to the iPod once and don’t sync regularly after that.

  56. My short list for why I listen to podcasts:

    1. Long commute. 2. I listen to talk radio. 3. I own an iPod. 4. I’m comfortable with technology.

    As far as I’m concerned if any one of these items weren’t part of my life I doubt I would listen to podcasts, but right now I’m addicted to them. The last 2 are pretty important because one has to be comfortable with the concept of downloading files and pushing to the iPod regularly, which I’m afraid is not an easy concept for some. Some people just digitize their whole music collection, push to the iPod once and don’t sync regularly after that.

  57. The observation of TV, radio, and newspapers is mostly on target. Yes, those are today’s models and analogies for new media, BUT…. What makes vlogging, pocasting and blogs stand out from the parent medium is timeshifting, placeshifting, and nicheiness.

    Teevee and radio especially as broadcasting makes time (when broadcasted) and place (your home or other stationary location with a TeeVee) critical to receiving the information or entertainment. So, you must plan your life around the information or entertainment that you want. With timeshifting and placeshifting you plan the information and entertainment into your life. Or when receiving it across the mobile network, little or no planning is required either.

    Examples include, listening to podcasts at the laundrymat, a sporting event, on a commute, during class (you are recording the lecture, right?) while waiting for a bus, train or other transportation.

    RE: placeshifting…I listen to podcasts on my mobile phone at the dog park. It could also be while I’m waiting for a dentist, doctor or hair stylist. Having podcasts on the device which is always with me is liberating from the whole planning cycle of placeshifting my fav content. This applies to video too as today I watch bliptv on my phone. I would also watch check out lots of other videos if I could.

  58. The observation of TV, radio, and newspapers is mostly on target. Yes, those are today’s models and analogies for new media, BUT…. What makes vlogging, pocasting and blogs stand out from the parent medium is timeshifting, placeshifting, and nicheiness.

    Teevee and radio especially as broadcasting makes time (when broadcasted) and place (your home or other stationary location with a TeeVee) critical to receiving the information or entertainment. So, you must plan your life around the information or entertainment that you want. With timeshifting and placeshifting you plan the information and entertainment into your life. Or when receiving it across the mobile network, little or no planning is required either.

    Examples include, listening to podcasts at the laundrymat, a sporting event, on a commute, during class (you are recording the lecture, right?) while waiting for a bus, train or other transportation.

    RE: placeshifting…I listen to podcasts on my mobile phone at the dog park. It could also be while I’m waiting for a dentist, doctor or hair stylist. Having podcasts on the device which is always with me is liberating from the whole planning cycle of placeshifting my fav content. This applies to video too as today I watch bliptv on my phone. I would also watch check out lots of other videos if I could.

  59. Robert,

    I can’t wait to see what you do with this new media. I think you’re more effective as a speaker than a writer, for example.

    I’m curious to know what your role at PodTech will be.
    As always, time answer these questions.

    The audience for podcasting is growing… there’s no denying that it fills a need for millions. I listen while I commute for 10 hours and lately have started listening to work safe content as I work. My co-workers play the radio or have XM devices and I just have my iPod handy to add another layer to my “wage slave” environment.

  60. Robert,

    I can’t wait to see what you do with this new media. I think you’re more effective as a speaker than a writer, for example.

    I’m curious to know what your role at PodTech will be.
    As always, time answer these questions.

    The audience for podcasting is growing… there’s no denying that it fills a need for millions. I listen while I commute for 10 hours and lately have started listening to work safe content as I work. My co-workers play the radio or have XM devices and I just have my iPod handy to add another layer to my “wage slave” environment.

  61. 5. Video Game Central – Endless upon endless unedited droning bluster about, geee, video games, as an added bonus, 2 hour heated-debates on Xbox 360 vs PS3. Occasionally, self-important types wax philosophical about the social implications of World of Warcraft.

    6. Egocasts – Look at me. Look at me. Did you see me? Huh? You want me to repeat that? Look at me. Random misc. daily happenings, of no particular importance whatsoever, but said blustered ego, thinks the world should know when he or she decides to change toothpaste brands. Oft times tries for the humorous outlook on daily life, but always fails miserably. Making the ordinary, transcendent, is an art-form only a rare few ever achieve, most often found in great literature, not quite via dizzy-headache-inducing retail-purchased handheld camera’s.

    7. Cults of Personalities – Self-appointed Silicon Valley notables and Venture Capitalists, vlogging and podcasting themselves and their friends all up. You are supposed to worship them and join their Cult of the Moment, as heck, that’s what it takes to get in this game. We are the big dogs, and if you don’t know that, I suggest you get with the program, fast.

    “You gave me fortune. You gave me fame. You me power in your god’s name. I’m every person you need to be. I’m the cult of personality.”

    8. Pretty in Pinks – No talent beach-ball Valley Girl wander-arounds, but get the audiences and the hits on account of the Secret Decoder Ring 34DD Codename.

    9. Empty Heads – Bland dull-as-rocks, corporate press-releasey talking-heads; thought of as brand new frontier by any number of Valley podcast start-ups. Has as a main feature, the inability to maintain EYE CONTACT with the camera. Here’s a word that might be too big for Corporate Spokespeople types, T-E-L-E-P-R-O-M-P-T-E-R, they are pretty affordable these days, use and love.

    10. Analyze That – Analysts and Journalists (that should really really stick with print) blathering on and on about the weeks general news in tech, lots of ‘ummms’, ‘yeah’, ‘cool’, ‘likes’ with endless sputterings and long pauses. Sort of ‘Washington in Week in Review’ only with half a bottle of Sleeping Pills extra. Broadcasting and radio takes talent…not much of that here.

    11. Wannabee Independent Film Makers – Art films and low-budget gore films podcasted and vlogged up for their own sake. Unwatchable — all Direction and no Script. In the immortal words of Sire Joe Bob Briggs, “I hear the word ‘independent,’ and I see movies about schizophrenic lesbian performance artists spouting freeform poetry.”

  62. A View From the Vlog Smog

    1. Vlogs about Vlogs all Vlogged up – Blog-level egos gone Video, endless pontificational ramblings about blogs, vlogs, podcasts, RSS feeds and the whole annoying scene. Circular content circling itself, squared (and then some). Video Killed The Blogging Star.

    2. YouTube Stupidisms and MySpace-Cadets – Mimicking that song or doing goofy grade-school-level humor spoofs, funny for the first time maybe, but even a stretch there. Passable for some teen-ager yucking around around with a camera, but downright embarrassing for 30-something geeks. Grow up, please.

    3. Tech Conference reports on Tech Conferences and the Tech Conference Attendees – Insider-baseball extreme, after recording the panels, the shaky cam’s wander around to the audience for another redundant poke. All smug and self-important.

    “What you weren’t at this conference? Well, obviously you don’t matter. But have a gander at what these so-so-important people have to say. You should consider yourself darned lucky that I am sooo kind-hearted and democratically-minded as to report on this and bring it down to your level, you lower-caste low-life pond-scum miserable excuses for human beings”.

    4. Geek Out, Freak Out – Geeks talking about their Computers, Gadgets and all things SciFi. The neurological and medical science research vlogs are few and far between, but boatloads of geeks taking geeky. These are the sort of people you run away from at parties, or feign a fainting spell if cornered. Run, scream and hide.

  63. A View From the Vlog Smog

    1. Vlogs about Vlogs all Vlogged up – Blog-level egos gone Video, endless pontificational ramblings about blogs, vlogs, podcasts, RSS feeds and the whole annoying scene. Circular content circling itself, squared (and then some). Video Killed The Blogging Star.

    2. YouTube Stupidisms and MySpace-Cadets – Mimicking that song or doing goofy grade-school-level humor spoofs, funny for the first time maybe, but even a stretch there. Passable for some teen-ager yucking around around with a camera, but downright embarrassing for 30-something geeks. Grow up, please.

    3. Tech Conference reports on Tech Conferences and the Tech Conference Attendees – Insider-baseball extreme, after recording the panels, the shaky cam’s wander around to the audience for another redundant poke. All smug and self-important.

    “What you weren’t at this conference? Well, obviously you don’t matter. But have a gander at what these so-so-important people have to say. You should consider yourself darned lucky that I am sooo kind-hearted and democratically-minded as to report on this and bring it down to your level, you lower-caste low-life pond-scum miserable excuses for human beings”.

    4. Geek Out, Freak Out – Geeks talking about their Computers, Gadgets and all things SciFi. The neurological and medical science research vlogs are few and far between, but boatloads of geeks taking geeky. These are the sort of people you run away from at parties, or feign a fainting spell if cornered. Run, scream and hide.

  64. 5. Video Game Central – Endless upon endless unedited droning bluster about, geee, video games, as an added bonus, 2 hour heated-debates on Xbox 360 vs PS3. Occasionally, self-important types wax philosophical about the social implications of World of Warcraft.

    6. Egocasts – Look at me. Look at me. Did you see me? Huh? You want me to repeat that? Look at me. Random misc. daily happenings, of no particular importance whatsoever, but said blustered ego, thinks the world should know when he or she decides to change toothpaste brands. Oft times tries for the humorous outlook on daily life, but always fails miserably. Making the ordinary, transcendent, is an art-form only a rare few ever achieve, most often found in great literature, not quite via dizzy-headache-inducing retail-purchased handheld camera’s.

    7. Cults of Personalities – Self-appointed Silicon Valley notables and Venture Capitalists, vlogging and podcasting themselves and their friends all up. You are supposed to worship them and join their Cult of the Moment, as heck, that’s what it takes to get in this game. We are the big dogs, and if you don’t know that, I suggest you get with the program, fast.

    “You gave me fortune. You gave me fame. You me power in your god’s name. I’m every person you need to be. I’m the cult of personality.”

    8. Pretty in Pinks – No talent beach-ball Valley Girl wander-arounds, but get the audiences and the hits on account of the Secret Decoder Ring 34DD Codename.

    9. Empty Heads – Bland dull-as-rocks, corporate press-releasey talking-heads; thought of as brand new frontier by any number of Valley podcast start-ups. Has as a main feature, the inability to maintain EYE CONTACT with the camera. Here’s a word that might be too big for Corporate Spokespeople types, T-E-L-E-P-R-O-M-P-T-E-R, they are pretty affordable these days, use and love.

    10. Analyze That – Analysts and Journalists (that should really really stick with print) blathering on and on about the weeks general news in tech, lots of ‘ummms’, ‘yeah’, ‘cool’, ‘likes’ with endless sputterings and long pauses. Sort of ‘Washington in Week in Review’ only with half a bottle of Sleeping Pills extra. Broadcasting and radio takes talent…not much of that here.

    11. Wannabee Independent Film Makers – Art films and low-budget gore films podcasted and vlogged up for their own sake. Unwatchable — all Direction and no Script. In the immortal words of Sire Joe Bob Briggs, “I hear the word ‘independent,’ and I see movies about schizophrenic lesbian performance artists spouting freeform poetry.”

  65. I’m looking forward to what the next wave of ‘casts will bring. Ultra portable and easy to store, what with the low costs of players and storage nowadays. Repalce that dusty stack of old newspapers with an iPod and a NAS device :)

  66. I’m looking forward to what the next wave of ‘casts will bring. Ultra portable and easy to store, what with the low costs of players and storage nowadays. Repalce that dusty stack of old newspapers with an iPod and a NAS device :)

  67. Definitely, Robert’s post and all these comments have, ad nauseam, delineated the boundaries of what the demand for Podcasts is/will be.

    The next question is how many competing suppliers will enter the market to satisfy that demand.

    My bet: a stunningly high amount.

    And so I just do not see alot of profit ahead for PodTech.

  68. Definitely, Robert’s post and all these comments have, ad nauseam, delineated the boundaries of what the demand for Podcasts is/will be.

    The next question is how many competing suppliers will enter the market to satisfy that demand.

    My bet: a stunningly high amount.

    And so I just do not see alot of profit ahead for PodTech.

  69. It is not only about the usage but the content. Would someone want to read a 500 page transcript of bloggercon or listen to it? And most people can’t go to all the conferences, but they want to get the knowledge. Podcasting changed my world.

  70. It is not only about the usage but the content. Would someone want to read a 500 page transcript of bloggercon or listen to it? And most people can’t go to all the conferences, but they want to get the knowledge. Podcasting changed my world.

  71. That guy Peter is all ‘wet’. Podcasting and video podcasting are complementary media formats to text. Text is great for comprehension and speed but audio and text have amazing benefits. Listening to someone
    ‘s voice is powerful and targeted and intimate.

    Good move on Scoble and PodTech. The future is often not seen by average people until it’s upon them…Scoble has always been a visionary and what PodTech seems to be doing is along those lines… can’t wait to see podcasting and videopodcasting get easier and better quality

  72. That guy Peter is all ‘wet’. Podcasting and video podcasting are complementary media formats to text. Text is great for comprehension and speed but audio and text have amazing benefits. Listening to someone
    ‘s voice is powerful and targeted and intimate.

    Good move on Scoble and PodTech. The future is often not seen by average people until it’s upon them…Scoble has always been a visionary and what PodTech seems to be doing is along those lines… can’t wait to see podcasting and videopodcasting get easier and better quality

  73. What will sell me on it is when I can adjust the playback speed of the recording. Most people (particularly the ones that are trained public speakers) speak painfully slow.

    I recently discovered that I can adjust the playback speed of audio and video in Windows Media player. In almost all cases, I can listen to the audio at 160% of regular speed and still catch everything. I’ve found that 130% is a decent listening speed for the average speaker.

    If I have the ability to set the playback speed of a podcast to 130% of the regular pace, then I will be 100% on board. Until then, I find it too painful to listen to the slow-talking people.

  74. What will sell me on it is when I can adjust the playback speed of the recording. Most people (particularly the ones that are trained public speakers) speak painfully slow.

    I recently discovered that I can adjust the playback speed of audio and video in Windows Media player. In almost all cases, I can listen to the audio at 160% of regular speed and still catch everything. I’ve found that 130% is a decent listening speed for the average speaker.

    If I have the ability to set the playback speed of a podcast to 130% of the regular pace, then I will be 100% on board. Until then, I find it too painful to listen to the slow-talking people.

  75. I have always had similar thoughts to David’s regarding Podcasting. In an age when we try to cram more and more into tighter periods of time, I have never understood how talk radio (podcasts) can make much of a comeback in the mainstream. It is not just that I can’t scan it quickly like a newspaper, but many of these people are amateur commentators: slower than they should be, and more impressed with themselves when they can squeeze in an extra joke or two. In terms of the view that this can be listened to in downtime when other media are not reasonable (commuting, driving, plane rides, etc), you still have to factor in the time it takes to organize the media. I understand that Podcasts will probably do just fine without my approval, and I am happy that it really works for some people. If it worked for everyone – that would be great too. But for me, I devour media, and cannot find a way to make Podcasts work for me. Video Podcasts I think are another story entirely. I think that will continue to grow and become a mainstream part of the net. (good move robert!)

  76. I have always had similar thoughts to David’s regarding Podcasting. In an age when we try to cram more and more into tighter periods of time, I have never understood how talk radio (podcasts) can make much of a comeback in the mainstream. It is not just that I can’t scan it quickly like a newspaper, but many of these people are amateur commentators: slower than they should be, and more impressed with themselves when they can squeeze in an extra joke or two. In terms of the view that this can be listened to in downtime when other media are not reasonable (commuting, driving, plane rides, etc), you still have to factor in the time it takes to organize the media. I understand that Podcasts will probably do just fine without my approval, and I am happy that it really works for some people. If it worked for everyone – that would be great too. But for me, I devour media, and cannot find a way to make Podcasts work for me. Video Podcasts I think are another story entirely. I think that will continue to grow and become a mainstream part of the net. (good move robert!)

  77. Peter is right when he says podcasts are inefficient, since the content behind it is inefficient.

    However I’d have to disagree on the fact that it cannot replace text content. Multi-media content is the wave of the future (both for web and mobile) and I think slowly but surely the rest of the world (amateur and corporate), will come to realize its effectiveness. But that cannot happen without proper changes in the format/structure of the content itself.

    Good luck at Podtech.net.

    - Mario Sundar
    Marketing Nirvana
    http://mariosundar.wordpress.com/

  78. Podcasting or Text?…

    “Why listen to a podcast when you can get ten times the content when you read?” That’s the question Peter Davis recently asked, and I’d like to attempt to answer it. Scoble chimed in with his response, essentially saying with communication, you sho…

  79. Peter is right when he says podcasts are inefficient, since the content behind it is inefficient.

    However I’d have to disagree on the fact that it cannot replace text content. Multi-media content is the wave of the future (both for web and mobile) and I think slowly but surely the rest of the world (amateur and corporate), will come to realize its effectiveness. But that cannot happen without proper changes in the format/structure of the content itself.

    Good luck at Podtech.net.

    - Mario Sundar
    Marketing Nirvana
    http://mariosundar.wordpress.com/

  80. Yes podcasting I’d argue is a very american and especially californio-centric idea. Where else do so many people spend so much time in long commutes stuck in their cars? I’d argue that in most other cities and countries a far great percentage of people spend less time commuting or commute by other means, for instance on trains where reading interfaces often work quite fine, or by bike where headphones (or reading too, heh) would just likely get you in an accident.

  81. Yes podcasting I’d argue is a very american and especially californio-centric idea. Where else do so many people spend so much time in long commutes stuck in their cars? I’d argue that in most other cities and countries a far great percentage of people spend less time commuting or commute by other means, for instance on trains where reading interfaces often work quite fine, or by bike where headphones (or reading too, heh) would just likely get you in an accident.

  82. As others have said, there is definitely a time and a place for podcasts. to me, listening to a podcast is akin to listening to talk radio. I only do it for background noise while commuting or puttering around the house.

  83. As others have said, there is definitely a time and a place for podcasts. to me, listening to a podcast is akin to listening to talk radio. I only do it for background noise while commuting or puttering around the house.

  84. other things that can be done while listening to podcasts, this is going to include actual manual labor thatsome people do for money 8+ hours a day,

    frame houses,
    hang sheetrock,
    lay bricks,
    dig ditches,
    mow grass,
    pull weeds,
    wash dishes,
    mop floors,
    build decks,
    drive truck,

    Here is a hint, if you are reading Robert Scoble’s blog you might just live inside the tech bubble. The worrld is much bigger than one industry.

  85. other things that can be done while listening to podcasts, this is going to include actual manual labor thatsome people do for money 8+ hours a day,

    frame houses,
    hang sheetrock,
    lay bricks,
    dig ditches,
    mow grass,
    pull weeds,
    wash dishes,
    mop floors,
    build decks,
    drive truck,

    Here is a hint, if you are reading Robert Scoble’s blog you might just live inside the tech bubble. The worrld is much bigger than one industry.

  86. I mostly listen to podcasts on my iPod taking the train from Auburn to Seattle each morning. It doesn’t give me motion sickness like reading a book or watching a video does. And many of the best podcasts are as entertaining as the best books or movies. I find myself listening to less radio, watching fewer movies and reading fewer books now that podcasts are so easy to find and download. iTunes still has some kinks in the managing subscriptions but it works fairly well and I’m sure it will improve.

  87. I mostly listen to podcasts on my iPod taking the train from Auburn to Seattle each morning. It doesn’t give me motion sickness like reading a book or watching a video does. And many of the best podcasts are as entertaining as the best books or movies. I find myself listening to less radio, watching fewer movies and reading fewer books now that podcasts are so easy to find and download. iTunes still has some kinks in the managing subscriptions but it works fairly well and I’m sure it will improve.

  88. Personally I find podcasts tedious and distracting…unless I put them on the old MP3 player and go for a walk. I LOVE listening to stuff when I’m walking for an hour sans kids, it’s my decompress time of the day, and I feel like I’m still being productive since I usually am catching up on various conferences.

    I’ve tried to listen to podcasts while working but I end up writing down what the person is saying; not real good there.

  89. Personally I find podcasts tedious and distracting…unless I put them on the old MP3 player and go for a walk. I LOVE listening to stuff when I’m walking for an hour sans kids, it’s my decompress time of the day, and I feel like I’m still being productive since I usually am catching up on various conferences.

    I’ve tried to listen to podcasts while working but I end up writing down what the person is saying; not real good there.

  90. Haha, so Chris Coulter hates *everything*. Ring ring, It’s not the clue phone it’s Time Life. They have a new 37 disc DVD set about the nuanced behavior of various molecules of dirt particles on Venus. Which, btw, if you saw that series LAST time they released the 25 DVD set, you’d know that Venus has direct historical connection to the Renaissance, and the origins of Latin derivativity in most common nomenclature in Chemistry.

    I dunno, I could be wrong. ;-)

  91. Haha, so Chris Coulter hates *everything*. Ring ring, It’s not the clue phone it’s Time Life. They have a new 37 disc DVD set about the nuanced behavior of various molecules of dirt particles on Venus. Which, btw, if you saw that series LAST time they released the 25 DVD set, you’d know that Venus has direct historical connection to the Renaissance, and the origins of Latin derivativity in most common nomenclature in Chemistry.

    I dunno, I could be wrong. ;-)

  92. [...] What interests me most about this post, and the amount of coverage it is getting on places like techmeme and Scoble’s blog, is that we used to hear this kind of argument a lot more 12 – 18 months ago but I haven’t heard it for ages. I had assumed most people now realized that comparing podcasts to blogs was like comparing radio to a newspaper. They are different mediums servicing different needs. And yet you never hear people arguing that radio is inefficient and we should all just read newspapers. Maybe there were people making that argument back in 1920, when Westinghouse’s KDKA-Pittsburgh broadcast the Harding-Cox election returns and began their daily schedule of radio programs? [...]

  93. Biggest problem with Podcasting? Not knowing how to diss it properly.

    Robert posted a thing about a dude who doesn’t like podcasting, like it’s some new three-assed monkey or something that we’ve never ever seen before.

    And of course, this brings standard snarky geeks out of the woodwork, yes I’m one too– with re…

  94. we used to hear this kind of argument a lot more 12 – 18 months ago but I haven’t heard it for ages. I had assumed most people now realized that comparing podcasts to blogs was like comparing radio to a newspaper. They are different mediums servicing different needs. And yet you never hear people arguing that radio is inefficient and we should all just read newspapers. Maybe there were people making that argument back in 1920, when Westinghouse’s KDKA-Pittsburgh broadcast the Harding-Cox election returns and began their daily schedule of radio programs?

  95. we used to hear this kind of argument a lot more 12 – 18 months ago but I haven’t heard it for ages. I had assumed most people now realized that comparing podcasts to blogs was like comparing radio to a newspaper. They are different mediums servicing different needs. And yet you never hear people arguing that radio is inefficient and we should all just read newspapers. Maybe there were people making that argument back in 1920, when Westinghouse’s KDKA-Pittsburgh broadcast the Harding-Cox election returns and began their daily schedule of radio programs?

  96. I totally agree with you. Certainly, I’m biased as the CEO of a local Podcasting start-up (www.pluggd.com), but I don’t think of things in terms of text vs audio vs video. All of these things will coexist today as Radio, TV, and print newpapers/magazines have coexisted for a long time.

    I don’t think podcasts are just about communiting or going to the gym. In fact, a majority of podcasters listen to the content on their PCs. It really comes down to the individual.

    I don’t really understand the skeptics out there. If you forget about the name “podcast”, and just ask if consumers would accept time-shifted on-demand audio/video that is free, relevant to their interests, and avoids all the DRM hassles, would anyone question the possibilities?

    Hell No!

  97. I totally agree with you. Certainly, I’m biased as the CEO of a local Podcasting start-up (www.pluggd.com), but I don’t think of things in terms of text vs audio vs video. All of these things will coexist today as Radio, TV, and print newpapers/magazines have coexisted for a long time.

    I don’t think podcasts are just about communiting or going to the gym. In fact, a majority of podcasters listen to the content on their PCs. It really comes down to the individual.

    I don’t really understand the skeptics out there. If you forget about the name “podcast”, and just ask if consumers would accept time-shifted on-demand audio/video that is free, relevant to their interests, and avoids all the DRM hassles, would anyone question the possibilities?

    Hell No!

  98. @66. you left out one other key element, “produced by people with actual talent that have something useful and relevant, and entertaining to say”. Lacking that key element podcasts are no different than high school radio broadcasts, except with the time shifting. And the majority of podcasts fall into that talentless category today.

  99. @66. you left out one other key element, “produced by people with actual talent that have something useful and relevant, and entertaining to say”. Lacking that key element podcasts are no different than high school radio broadcasts, except with the time shifting. And the majority of podcasts fall into that talentless category today.

  100. @37, you mean like books on tape, DVR material I can download to my PC or portable device with Tivo or WMC? Nothing new to see here.

    Time-shifted radio broadcasts are great. I love listening to PhilHendrie, ESPN’s PTI, LauraIngraham, or even some WSJ podcasts. But the reason I do is that those are well produced, delivered by people with talent that are entertaining and have quality content. The few Valley type podcasts I’ve attempted to listen to, I swear I’m listening to Dr. Nick Riviera, Professor Frink, or Comic Book Guy. The lack of talent or skill in broadcast detracts from the actual message. And don’t get me started on video by talentless geeks. Even worse. It will take off only when there is talent behind the mic or the camera. Not there today.

  101. @37, you mean like books on tape, DVR material I can download to my PC or portable device with Tivo or WMC? Nothing new to see here.

    Time-shifted radio broadcasts are great. I love listening to PhilHendrie, ESPN’s PTI, LauraIngraham, or even some WSJ podcasts. But the reason I do is that those are well produced, delivered by people with talent that are entertaining and have quality content. The few Valley type podcasts I’ve attempted to listen to, I swear I’m listening to Dr. Nick Riviera, Professor Frink, or Comic Book Guy. The lack of talent or skill in broadcast detracts from the actual message. And don’t get me started on video by talentless geeks. Even worse. It will take off only when there is talent behind the mic or the camera. Not there today.

  102. Is Podcasting Inefficient?

    In the time I can listen to an average podcast, I could have caught up on my 50 favorite blogs, or read a chapter in a book, or read the latest issue of Red Herring magazine, says Peter Davis. Well, he may not realize the benefits because chances are …

  103. Robert, and the other Podcast guys, this is what you’re missing.

    You’re missing something here.  You really are.  It’s not about whether “we’ve had this conversation before” because if you’ve only convinced yourself you’ve only just started.  It’s not about whether …

  104. I still have one problem with podcasts, in the inability to “scan” hundreds of sound files the way I can scan hundreds of blogs.

    It’s tough to say in a one second if a podcast will interest you (or not), while it can be easily done (with good accuracy, not perfect but good) with text.

    But I’m sure a tool like podzinger will help correct that… Podcasting will rock!

  105. I still have one problem with podcasts, in the inability to “scan” hundreds of sound files the way I can scan hundreds of blogs.

    It’s tough to say in a one second if a podcast will interest you (or not), while it can be easily done (with good accuracy, not perfect but good) with text.

    But I’m sure a tool like podzinger will help correct that… Podcasting will rock!

  106. Why listen to the radio when you can watch TV (both sight and sound is better/more/faster right?)
    Why go to the concert when you can just download the song for free?
    Why text chat when you can skype?
    Why meet in person when you can just meet in Second Life?

    Oh, freedom of choice.

  107. Why listen to the radio when you can watch TV (both sight and sound is better/more/faster right?)
    Why go to the concert when you can just download the song for free?
    Why text chat when you can skype?
    Why meet in person when you can just meet in Second Life?

    Oh, freedom of choice.

  108. [...] Ex-Microsoft-evangelist Robert Scoble reageert op de stelling dat podcasting, het luisteren naar gedownloade audiobestanden dus, inefficiënt is omdat je in dezelfde tijd veel meer informatie tot je kunt nemen door te lezen. Scoble zegt: ‘use the right tool for the job, […] some things need to be heard.‘ Helemaal waar. Los daarvan is podcasting juist extreem efficiënt: je kunt naar podcasts luisteren tijdens het fietsen, fitnessen, hardlopen, stofzuigen, boodschappen doen, reizen, autorijden en koken. Om een paar dingen te noemen. Je kunt naar podcasts luisteren op momenten dat je niet naar beeldschermen of papieren letters kunt staren, maar toch genoeg aandacht over hebt voor kwaliteitsentertainment of boeiende verhalen. Ook voor verhalen die je later op de dag vervolgens niet in papieren vorm hoeft te lezen – dat scheelt dus ook weer tijd. Er is één klein technisch nadeel aan podcasten met iTunes en een iPod. Wanneer ik mijn iPod aansluit, gebeuren de volgende dingen: – iTunes wordt opgestart – iTunes gaat mijn iPod updaten met de reeds aanwezige, door iTunes gedownloade nieuwe podcasts – Binnen iTunes verschijnt intussen de melding: iPod wordt bijgewerkt. Niet loskoppelen – iTunes gaat kijken of er nieuwe podcasts kunnen worden gedownload – Mijn iPod is na een seconde of tien wel geupdated, en binnen iTunes verschijnt dan ook de melding: De iPod is bijgewerkt – Ondertussen is iTunes bezig met het downloaden van nieuwe podcastafleveringen. Wanneer dit is voltooid, staat bovenaan echter nog altijd de melding dat mijn iPod is bijgewerkt! Terwijl iTunes op dat moment al nieuwe afleveringen heeft klaarstaan die ik echter nog met een druk op de knop naar mijn iPod moet sturen. [...]

  109. [...] I know some of you may be wondering what happened to the podcasting debate started earlier this week by Peter T. Davis and followed-up by Scoble. I added my 2 cents to it and Peter came up with another post yesterday, where he reiterated his question. Is the audience big enough to get the attention of advertisers? I don’t know. Is it a fad? It sure looks like one to me.To get back to the point, what you’re missing, it’s not enough to tell people that we can do it. We can do a lot of things. Why should we do it? And, I don’t mean why should someone produce a podcast, I can think of a thousand reasons. But, the real question is why should I (or anyone else) listen? You need to convince people how it’s going to benefit them. [...]

  110. [...] En este articulo tambien aparecen como referencias articulos como el de un Peter Davis, el que argumentan que los podcast pueden ser ineficientes por el tiempo que te lleva escucharlos, para esto compara un podcast de 25 minutos y dice que como leer 25 paginas de un libro. Pero tambien aparece Scobleize defendiendo los Podcast, donde el argumento es que si sales a correr, estas cocinando, o leyendo algunas cosas puedes al mismo tiempo escuchar un podcast. Asi que es como quedar en cero segun estos mismos argumentos. Pero creo que los podcast si pueden ser una perdida de tiempo, lo digo porque he escuchado algunos que realmente me hicieron perder el tiempo, porque no me aportaron nada, en esto me he encontrado con relatos, conversaciones o entrevistas que me dejaron con la pregunta ?y para que hicieron de esto un podcast?. Bajo esa premisa SI los podcast pueden ser una perdida de tiempo. Por lo mismo deberia existir una forma de poder clasificarlos de mejor manera, de tal forma que los que lo ecuchen le pongan nota o algo parecido (y que si a mis amigos les gusto o no tenga una valoracion distinta), pensando en ir mas alla de los comentarios, ya que asi podriamos filtrar que queremos escuchar y que no. Si hacemos Podcast en este blog es para que no pierdas tu tiempo, es para compartir conversaciones que creemos te pueden aportar una mirada diferente, que explore temas nuevos, que creen debate o una reflexion de temas que queremos destacar, ademas de que escuches “buena musica” (jejejejejeje, segun nuestros extranios gustos). [...]

  111. [...] If you are revolutionary, make sure that a revolution is coming.  Tagging social networks into podcasting clouds sure sounds fancy, but where is the wave to jump on?  Evidence mounts that podcasting is not monetizable in ways many Web 2.0 businesses are counting on.  If you are banking on podcasting being a daily activity by 150 million Americans in three years, you should be able to trace the path between now and then and explain clearly what are the causes of this change.  Tagging is important and will be a component of the future of finding and categorizing information online, but its just keywords with a little spicy sauce on top.  That’s an evolution, and must be addressed differently. [...]