Nielsen blows it on podcasting

Oh, Jon Watson over on the BizPodcasting blog you totally nailed it. What kind of horse manure is this to compare listeners to podcasts to authors of blogging? Lame beyond belief.

And podcasting doesn’t need the false hype. We need real numbers, real research, with organizations we, and advertisers, can believe. This doesn’t help us out AT ALL.

It takes me back to when I started blogging, though. Back in 2000. I told Dori Smith that there weren’t enough blogs to do a conference session (I was helping plan the CNET Builder.com Live conference and could only find about 100 blogs back then. Dori was one of the speakers at that conference and had been pitching me to do a session on blogs) but within a week of my starting to write a blog Dave Winer had linked to me and sent more than 3,000 with just that one link. Whoa, there are more people reading blogs than are writing them! (Still true, by the way).

Comments

  1. Jesus scoble, calm down. All this survey reveals is that two distinct internet activities have similar usage figures. There is no comment about the demographic breakdown of these two groups, just that they have similar levels of activity.

  2. Jesus scoble, calm down. All this survey reveals is that two distinct internet activities have similar usage figures. There is no comment about the demographic breakdown of these two groups, just that they have similar levels of activity.

  3. I have no real hard numbers, but tons of white-earred iPod creatures, that I know, use podcasts and download them, it has great mainstream branding reco. Not a single one of them reads blogs (nor cares one single iota). Video and Podcasting, if professionally done, has a far better chance at a broadcasting numbers, over the A-list rigged blogrollish blogger-poetry games. But really, once it gets good enough, it just becomes broadcasting, everything else is niche, but many niche’s hooked together can be something.

    Every SINGLE one of Rush Limbaugh’s (that is MILLIONS of) users has heard him time and time again mention podcasting, but it’s mianly thought of as pro’s going mobile, not all this geeky grassroots, tech for tech sake, medium is the message fluff.

    I think Nielsen got it exactly right.

    And the comparison was in representive sampling numbers, not in direct similarity, you guys ever take Statistics in college? ;)

  4. I have no real hard numbers, but tons of white-earred iPod creatures, that I know, use podcasts and download them, it has great mainstream branding reco. Not a single one of them reads blogs (nor cares one single iota). Video and Podcasting, if professionally done, has a far better chance at a broadcasting numbers, over the A-list rigged blogrollish blogger-poetry games. But really, once it gets good enough, it just becomes broadcasting, everything else is niche, but many niche’s hooked together can be something.

    Every SINGLE one of Rush Limbaugh’s (that is MILLIONS of) users has heard him time and time again mention podcasting, but it’s mianly thought of as pro’s going mobile, not all this geeky grassroots, tech for tech sake, medium is the message fluff.

    I think Nielsen got it exactly right.

    And the comparison was in representive sampling numbers, not in direct similarity, you guys ever take Statistics in college? ;)

  5. At the root of the problem is where Nielsen makes its money. Much like the ABC (Audit Bureau of Circulations), Nielsen is a business that needs to make money from their mainstream media clients.

    My conspiracy theory: If you’re part of the mainstream media, any data that lumps all those internet geeks together and provides teeny tiny percentages is great data.

  6. At the root of the problem is where Nielsen makes its money. Much like the ABC (Audit Bureau of Circulations), Nielsen is a business that needs to make money from their mainstream media clients.

    My conspiracy theory: If you’re part of the mainstream media, any data that lumps all those internet geeks together and provides teeny tiny percentages is great data.

  7. Ya, the comparison is apples and oranges, but the larger points on the trend lines of acceptance and value of podcastng in the mainstream are what resonate. That Nielson is giving the number-crunchers on Madison Avenue more to chew on is the positive rub here. There’s no blogs vs. podcasting issue, it’s both in spades. Also interesting is the recent KnowledgeStorm paper that shows IT buyers in enterprises getting hip to B2B podcasts for making business decisions. More at http://blogs.zdnet.com/Gardner/?p=2317.

  8. Ya, the comparison is apples and oranges, but the larger points on the trend lines of acceptance and value of podcastng in the mainstream are what resonate. That Nielson is giving the number-crunchers on Madison Avenue more to chew on is the positive rub here. There’s no blogs vs. podcasting issue, it’s both in spades. Also interesting is the recent KnowledgeStorm paper that shows IT buyers in enterprises getting hip to B2B podcasts for making business decisions. More at http://blogs.zdnet.com/Gardner/?p=2317.

  9. Robert,
    You are absolutely correct…I noticed the same thing. They confuse downloading a podcast (user/listener) with producing a podcast and compare writing a blog with downloading a podcast….then go on and talk about the demographics of downloading a podcast. These research companies need to pay more attention and learn before they write….and define before they research.

    Marianne
    http://www.media-slaves.blogspot.com

  10. Robert,
    You are absolutely correct…I noticed the same thing. They confuse downloading a podcast (user/listener) with producing a podcast and compare writing a blog with downloading a podcast….then go on and talk about the demographics of downloading a podcast. These research companies need to pay more attention and learn before they write….and define before they research.

    Marianne
    http://www.media-slaves.blogspot.com

  11. Surely it’s not ‘apples vs. oranges’, its ‘apple orchards vs. orange juice’. That is, Nielsen is comparing bloggers (i.e. producers) with podcast listeners (i.e. consumers).

    A comparison of podcast listeners with blog readers might be more useful here.

  12. Surely it’s not ‘apples vs. oranges’, its ‘apple orchards vs. orange juice’. That is, Nielsen is comparing bloggers (i.e. producers) with podcast listeners (i.e. consumers).

    A comparison of podcast listeners with blog readers might be more useful here.

  13. You’re attaching emotional interpretation to the numbers. When Nielsen says ‘on par’, they’re merely referring to the total number of listeners. They’re not making any audience characteristic comparisons. Their numbers feel right to me.

  14. You’re attaching emotional interpretation to the numbers. When Nielsen says ‘on par’, they’re merely referring to the total number of listeners. They’re not making any audience characteristic comparisons. Their numbers feel right to me.

  15. ^Because people don’t need to read too much, and some people don’t like reading :P.

    I agree with Andrew, it’s definitley not the same concept. An “apple orchards vs orange juice” analogy really fits in this case.

    Cheers,

    gamehawk :)

  16. ^Because people don’t need to read too much, and some people don’t like reading :P.

    I agree with Andrew, it’s definitley not the same concept. An “apple orchards vs orange juice” analogy really fits in this case.

    Cheers,

    gamehawk :)

  17. Nielsen’s take on podcasting rubs people the wrong way

    Think my take on the Nielsen numbers was harsh? Take a look at a few other perspectives. Robert Scoble, VP of Media Development at PodTech.net, says that the Nielsen numbers blows when it comes to podcasting.

  18. I have to agree with Weeksie. Why are you (and others) getting so het up about this? It’s just a comparible figure, not comparing the two things. They’re both just things people do on the internet.

    And I thought you weren’t linking to/reading Memeorandum-type sites? :)

  19. I have to agree with Weeksie. Why are you (and others) getting so het up about this? It’s just a comparible figure, not comparing the two things. They’re both just things people do on the internet.

    And I thought you weren’t linking to/reading Memeorandum-type sites? :)

  20. Yeah, the way they kept referring to people who listen to podcasts as “podcasters” cracked me up. Are people who listen to broadcasts referred to as “broadcasters?” [rolleyes]

    It sounded so Senator Stevens-esque, like some old guy who just. didn’t. get. it. trying to wrap his head around “podcasters.” “Nielsen/NetRatings announced today that 6.6 percent of the Internet is filled with podcasters. This leaves 93.4 percent of the tubes available to receive Internets. This puts podcasters on par with men who have had pedicures, at 6.5 percent of the population, which is lower than the amount of the Internet tubes filled with pictures of Princess Leia in her slave girl costume, at 12.7 percent. Video podcasters trend somewhat younger, in the 16-59 demographic. ‘Video podcasts clearly have yet to penetrate the older population,’ said a Nielsen analyst. ‘We think they are missing out because it is well known that retired people have Internet tubes which are not delayed by enormous amounts of illegal music and whatnot.’”

  21. Yeah, the way they kept referring to people who listen to podcasts as “podcasters” cracked me up. Are people who listen to broadcasts referred to as “broadcasters?” [rolleyes]

    It sounded so Senator Stevens-esque, like some old guy who just. didn’t. get. it. trying to wrap his head around “podcasters.” “Nielsen/NetRatings announced today that 6.6 percent of the Internet is filled with podcasters. This leaves 93.4 percent of the tubes available to receive Internets. This puts podcasters on par with men who have had pedicures, at 6.5 percent of the population, which is lower than the amount of the Internet tubes filled with pictures of Princess Leia in her slave girl costume, at 12.7 percent. Video podcasters trend somewhat younger, in the 16-59 demographic. ‘Video podcasts clearly have yet to penetrate the older population,’ said a Nielsen analyst. ‘We think they are missing out because it is well known that retired people have Internet tubes which are not delayed by enormous amounts of illegal music and whatnot.’”

  22. Their numbers feel right to me.

    Likewise, but emotional interpretations to bloggers are like bullets to a Thompson M1, all rapid fire. It’s just data points.

  23. Their numbers feel right to me.

    Likewise, but emotional interpretations to bloggers are like bullets to a Thompson M1, all rapid fire. It’s just data points.

  24. Robert

    Your beef here is or should be with Podcasting News — not Neilsen. Neilsen just gathered and published information about the internet as far as I can see. It is Podcasting News that seems to have introduced the lameness in the interest of a provocative headline to as a way to build links to its site — and you and Jon Watson took the bait, hook, line and sinker.

    Brian

  25. Robert

    Your beef here is or should be with Podcasting News — not Neilsen. Neilsen just gathered and published information about the internet as far as I can see. It is Podcasting News that seems to have introduced the lameness in the interest of a provocative headline to as a way to build links to its site — and you and Jon Watson took the bait, hook, line and sinker.

    Brian

  26. A-List Review Project: #26 Scobleizer

    July 20th I am turning 40, so to celebrate I am going to profile 40 of the A-List blogs, 2 per day each day, until my birthday.Previous reviews:  #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #11, #12,…

  27. Robert, you are right on. The point here is the comparison, some of your commenters don’t get that. Obviously you are a promoter of both blogging and podcasting.

    The irony is that Nielsen/Netratings provides reach data for websites, including the top blog sites. Why didn’t they compare the “reach” of blogs with the “downloads” of podcasting. That would be much closer to an apples to apples comparison.

  28. Robert, you are right on. The point here is the comparison, some of your commenters don’t get that. Obviously you are a promoter of both blogging and podcasting.

    The irony is that Nielsen/Netratings provides reach data for websites, including the top blog sites. Why didn’t they compare the “reach” of blogs with the “downloads” of podcasting. That would be much closer to an apples to apples comparison.

  29. Let’s see here, Scoble links to a blog, that links to another blog, that mentions a Nielsen report, and nary a word from the report itself.

    When I finally tracked down the actual report I find it quite interesting (if believable). Yes, they did misuse the term Podcaster. But the correlation in their samples between people who listen to podcasts and other activities is VERY interesting, or at least should be to anyone in that business.

    I see podcastings main “competitor” as being drive time radio listening. I DO occasionally listen to podcasts as I am using my PC, but it is hard (I’d really say impossible) to read a technical article on the web and listen to a tech podcast at the same time. Try it!

    I’ll often listen to Gilmor Gang while I drive, but am more likely to listen to music or at most some talk radio show (the kind you don’t have to pay much attention to) while I work at the PC.

    One bad attribute that podcasting (as now implemented) has that reminds me of the old magazine subscriptions: most of the magazines I subscribed to never got read. They just piled up in the corner of my office until the pile started falling over and had to be thrown away. Yet the magazines proudly claimed circulations in the millions to advertiser wondering why the phone never rings.

    Web based reading though is easy to measure DIRECTLY as it is being read. I think advertisers (people actually interested in selling a product anyway, not middlemen like Nielsen) will eventually “get it” that there is a big difference in a huge subscriber base of people who may or may not hear your ad and actual click-throughs for web based written content. It may take a few more years though, as most of these people are still brainwashed by the media companies that specialized in TV and print-media marketing.

    PS: link to report…

    http://www.nielsen-netratings.com/pr/pr_060712.pdf

  30. Let’s see here, Scoble links to a blog, that links to another blog, that mentions a Nielsen report, and nary a word from the report itself.

    When I finally tracked down the actual report I find it quite interesting (if believable). Yes, they did misuse the term Podcaster. But the correlation in their samples between people who listen to podcasts and other activities is VERY interesting, or at least should be to anyone in that business.

    I see podcastings main “competitor” as being drive time radio listening. I DO occasionally listen to podcasts as I am using my PC, but it is hard (I’d really say impossible) to read a technical article on the web and listen to a tech podcast at the same time. Try it!

    I’ll often listen to Gilmor Gang while I drive, but am more likely to listen to music or at most some talk radio show (the kind you don’t have to pay much attention to) while I work at the PC.

    One bad attribute that podcasting (as now implemented) has that reminds me of the old magazine subscriptions: most of the magazines I subscribed to never got read. They just piled up in the corner of my office until the pile started falling over and had to be thrown away. Yet the magazines proudly claimed circulations in the millions to advertiser wondering why the phone never rings.

    Web based reading though is easy to measure DIRECTLY as it is being read. I think advertisers (people actually interested in selling a product anyway, not middlemen like Nielsen) will eventually “get it” that there is a big difference in a huge subscriber base of people who may or may not hear your ad and actual click-throughs for web based written content. It may take a few more years though, as most of these people are still brainwashed by the media companies that specialized in TV and print-media marketing.

    PS: link to report…

    http://www.nielsen-netratings.com/pr/pr_060712.pdf

  31. “Whoa, there are more people reading blogs than are writing them! (Still true, by the way).”

    And good thing too, since most blogs are useless. I do get tired of hearing how influential the “blogosphere” is and how in empowers people, while it looks to me like it’s just another exclusive club – the “important” bloggers link to each other and everyone else is left out. Podcasting is slowly going this way as well.

    Listen, bloggers, some of you have interesting things to say, and I do get good technical information from some blogs, but most of you take yourselves way too seriously. Just because you can get your message out to anyone who stumbles across your page, it doesn’t make it more worthy of my time than any other activity I could use that time for.

  32. “Whoa, there are more people reading blogs than are writing them! (Still true, by the way).”

    And good thing too, since most blogs are useless. I do get tired of hearing how influential the “blogosphere” is and how in empowers people, while it looks to me like it’s just another exclusive club – the “important” bloggers link to each other and everyone else is left out. Podcasting is slowly going this way as well.

    Listen, bloggers, some of you have interesting things to say, and I do get good technical information from some blogs, but most of you take yourselves way too seriously. Just because you can get your message out to anyone who stumbles across your page, it doesn’t make it more worthy of my time than any other activity I could use that time for.

  33. I have a BS in engineering and a masters in statistics (not bragging, just making that clear to Coulter), and have spent much of my 20+ year professional career interpreting stats. I’d like to share my thoughts on this matter. (Warning: This is a long comment).

    I don’t agree with everything Scoble says (no offense Robert – I don’t agree with ANYONE all of the time), but he and Watson have good reason to be baffled. The comparison doesn’t make sense to me either.

    Here are my initial observations (based solely on what’s reported in the article, and including some repetition of what other commenters have said):

    1. I would not compare two groups that contain some of the same people. Don’t you think that a few of those who publish blogs have also downloaded podcasts?

    2. I would not compare producers to consumers (as Scoble and Watson have already pointed out).

    3. Nielsen labels that 6.6% as the “podcasting population” in the second paragraph, which implies to me that they are producers of podcasts, not consumers. Yes, I know that they said in the first paragraph that the figures represent users who download podcasts, but it doesn’t matter. The labeling is confusing, and could easily cause those who give the article a quick glance to arrive at the wrong conclusion.

    4. The figures provided are not “sampling numbers” as Coulter suggests. The 9.2mil number is an estimate derived from the 6.6% statistic, which itself is an estimate derived from a representative sample of the entire population of folks who do stuff online. The size of that representative sample is likely in the thousands, not in the millions.

    5. They’re stating in the headline that “Podcasts More Popular than Blogging.” Again, the label “podcasts” implies that it’s producers, not consumers. How many people are going to read that headline and draw the wrong conclusion? Too many, I’m afraid. Also, popularity is relative to one’s choices.

    6. It seems as if they’re trying to compare the number of users for different applications of Internet technology. I see far more interesting & valuable comparisons to be made. For example, if I were in Scoble’s new role (congrats on that), I’d like to know how people allocate their time and interests. Are they listening to a radio station, listening to downloaded music, watching cable, watching a DVD, reading a book, or using no entertainment technology? When & where are these things being consumed? What types of subject matter (ie sports, business, health) are they consuming? During what times and occasions do they consume that content? What are the various lengths of the content?

    7. Where is a chart or graph? In this day and age, firms like Nielsen should be publishing easy-to-understand and easy-to-distribute charts and graphs. Ever hear of “a picture tells a thousand words”? One well-done visual is not only easier for the lay person to understand than quoted stats, but it can also better represent the shape and spread of the data behind the stats – features which are often ignored but are a very important part of comparing two or more groups of anything (especially if the data is being used to drive big-bucks decisions).

    8. Note that Nielsen has segmented the data by age group, which they (and most of their client companies) have done for many years. I believe that categorizing by age is becoming less and less pertinent, since groups of people with common interests don’t always cluster neatly into small age groups the way they used to. Certain interests, such as video game players, will naturally be concentrated in younger age groups, but other interests are becoming spread more broadly across the age spectrum.
    Trust me – segmentation by age group is not only old school, but it reduces your actual target market. Think interests first when segmenting your audience. Better yet, let the data tell you how it should be clustered.

    Unfortunately, the proportion of folks who have taken stats classes AND understand stats – especially years after going thru those classes – is very low. That’s not the fault of most people; instead, it’s a problem with our educational system in how they teach stats (IMHO). Criticizing people for not knowing their statistical theory won’t solve anything.

    Asking the right question, structuring the right study to answer that question, and (VERY important) presenting the results in an easy-to-understand fashion is always do-able. All of that is the responsibility of the person(s) or team(s) doing the number-crunching of data and delivery of results.

  34. I have a BS in engineering and a masters in statistics (not bragging, just making that clear to Coulter), and have spent much of my 20+ year professional career interpreting stats. I’d like to share my thoughts on this matter. (Warning: This is a long comment).

    I don’t agree with everything Scoble says (no offense Robert – I don’t agree with ANYONE all of the time), but he and Watson have good reason to be baffled. The comparison doesn’t make sense to me either.

    Here are my initial observations (based solely on what’s reported in the article, and including some repetition of what other commenters have said):

    1. I would not compare two groups that contain some of the same people. Don’t you think that a few of those who publish blogs have also downloaded podcasts?

    2. I would not compare producers to consumers (as Scoble and Watson have already pointed out).

    3. Nielsen labels that 6.6% as the “podcasting population” in the second paragraph, which implies to me that they are producers of podcasts, not consumers. Yes, I know that they said in the first paragraph that the figures represent users who download podcasts, but it doesn’t matter. The labeling is confusing, and could easily cause those who give the article a quick glance to arrive at the wrong conclusion.

    4. The figures provided are not “sampling numbers” as Coulter suggests. The 9.2mil number is an estimate derived from the 6.6% statistic, which itself is an estimate derived from a representative sample of the entire population of folks who do stuff online. The size of that representative sample is likely in the thousands, not in the millions.

    5. They’re stating in the headline that “Podcasts More Popular than Blogging.” Again, the label “podcasts” implies that it’s producers, not consumers. How many people are going to read that headline and draw the wrong conclusion? Too many, I’m afraid. Also, popularity is relative to one’s choices.

    6. It seems as if they’re trying to compare the number of users for different applications of Internet technology. I see far more interesting & valuable comparisons to be made. For example, if I were in Scoble’s new role (congrats on that), I’d like to know how people allocate their time and interests. Are they listening to a radio station, listening to downloaded music, watching cable, watching a DVD, reading a book, or using no entertainment technology? When & where are these things being consumed? What types of subject matter (ie sports, business, health) are they consuming? During what times and occasions do they consume that content? What are the various lengths of the content?

    7. Where is a chart or graph? In this day and age, firms like Nielsen should be publishing easy-to-understand and easy-to-distribute charts and graphs. Ever hear of “a picture tells a thousand words”? One well-done visual is not only easier for the lay person to understand than quoted stats, but it can also better represent the shape and spread of the data behind the stats – features which are often ignored but are a very important part of comparing two or more groups of anything (especially if the data is being used to drive big-bucks decisions).

    8. Note that Nielsen has segmented the data by age group, which they (and most of their client companies) have done for many years. I believe that categorizing by age is becoming less and less pertinent, since groups of people with common interests don’t always cluster neatly into small age groups the way they used to. Certain interests, such as video game players, will naturally be concentrated in younger age groups, but other interests are becoming spread more broadly across the age spectrum.
    Trust me – segmentation by age group is not only old school, but it reduces your actual target market. Think interests first when segmenting your audience. Better yet, let the data tell you how it should be clustered.

    Unfortunately, the proportion of folks who have taken stats classes AND understand stats – especially years after going thru those classes – is very low. That’s not the fault of most people; instead, it’s a problem with our educational system in how they teach stats (IMHO). Criticizing people for not knowing their statistical theory won’t solve anything.

    Asking the right question, structuring the right study to answer that question, and (VERY important) presenting the results in an easy-to-understand fashion is always do-able. All of that is the responsibility of the person(s) or team(s) doing the number-crunching of data and delivery of results.

  35. I think you got this one wrong Scoble. They are just reporting the numbers based on their poll, not trying to help nor hurt vloggers. So there are more podcast listeners than blog writers. No surprise there.

    I don’t think it makes much sense to compare the number of podcast listeners to blog readers since there are quite a number of people who read blogs without knowing what a blog is.

  36. I think you got this one wrong Scoble. They are just reporting the numbers based on their poll, not trying to help nor hurt vloggers. So there are more podcast listeners than blog writers. No surprise there.

    I don’t think it makes much sense to compare the number of podcast listeners to blog readers since there are quite a number of people who read blogs without knowing what a blog is.

  37. “don’t get religious about OS’s”???? Shouldn’t the more accurate statement be “Now that MS doesn’t pay my salary I’m no longer religious about OS’s”? I mean, do we really have to dig out the Vista posts from the past to illustrate the ridiculousness of your statment?

  38. “don’t get religious about OS’s”???? Shouldn’t the more accurate statement be “Now that MS doesn’t pay my salary I’m no longer religious about OS’s”? I mean, do we really have to dig out the Vista posts from the past to illustrate the ridiculousness of your statment?

  39. Ha, that comment about undeserved hype was kind of funny coming from you Robert. Reminds me of that whole HDTV will increase American soccer viewing theory.

    I think Nielsen is attempting to give people real numbers; they do want to sell NetRatings data to advertisers. Unfortunately they screwed up by using podcaster incorrectly and ruined their credibility in this particular intance. But they are trying to work out the measurment of these new media. It will obviously take a while to work out the details in a way that satisfies tech experts and helps advertisers.

  40. Ha, that comment about undeserved hype was kind of funny coming from you Robert. Reminds me of that whole HDTV will increase American soccer viewing theory.

    I think Nielsen is attempting to give people real numbers; they do want to sell NetRatings data to advertisers. Unfortunately they screwed up by using podcaster incorrectly and ruined their credibility in this particular intance. But they are trying to work out the measurment of these new media. It will obviously take a while to work out the details in a way that satisfies tech experts and helps advertisers.

  41. Nick: No, no it’s not. It’s mearly saying “Most bloggers can’t write.”

    You need only to search random “latest posts” from various free blogging services to find support for this conclusion.

  42. Nick: No, no it’s not. It’s mearly saying “Most bloggers can’t write.”

    You need only to search random “latest posts” from various free blogging services to find support for this conclusion.

  43. [...] Nielsen/NetRatings gets us excited with a report showing robust growth in podcasting and then qualifies it in subsequent conversations when asked questions by, well, people who can ask questions. The right ones, that is.  Frank Barnako pops the balloon here.  Many interested parties are incredulous, such as Robert Scoble.  I, on the other hand, think the report shows such a high degree of fascination with podcasting and therefore the need for speed in releasing the report that a lot of approvals got rushed.  Facts didn’t get checked, appropriate comparisons were not made.  I know none of us have ever made mistakes like that.  [...]

  44. I’d take on the bullet points, but that would pour gasoline on an already pointless drama fit.

  45. I’d take on the bullet points, but that would pour gasoline on an already pointless drama fit.

  46. Podcast Evangelist Scoble rocks on!

    John Furrier’s strategy to rope in Scoble to Podtech, will surely yield rich benefits going by the tremendous job Scoble is doing in raising interest in podcasts, as you can see here and there.
    This augurs well for me as a corporate podcast evang…

  47. [...] Barnako is highlighting research from Nielsen Analytics, released last week, that focuses on the Economics of Podcasting. In the past, Nielsen’s research has been subject to ridicule by some podcasters because Nielsen seems to confuse podcast listeners with podcasters. Their research is nevertheless helping to define the current understanding of podcasting. [...]