Why Ozzie doesn’t think the Web is the be all and end all

I was reading Joe Wilcox’ analysis of Ray Ozzie’s speech and later Ryan Stewart chimed in and the whole time I was reading that I was wondering:

Does Joe or Ryan know that Ray is an investor in Second Life?

If he did, that would have explained why Ray believes that the Web won’t deliver the most interesting experiences online. You go try to build Second Life in AJAX. I’ve seen it done and it’s not pretty.

It’s not lost on me either that the first thing I tried to do with Gmail is hook Outlook up to it. I can’t stand using the Web browser for email. And I have both the beta of the new Hotmail as well as Google’s new corporate Gmail and Maryam uses Yahoo’s email (formerly Oddpost). These are the three leading web-based email systems. I know many of you are OK with reading your email on the Web, but I’m too used to having my email offline. It gives me peace of mind to know I’m in control of my access to my email.

115 thoughts on “Why Ozzie doesn’t think the Web is the be all and end all

  1. I can’t agree with you enough.
    *MY* email should be on *MY* system. I will never have it any other way.

  2. I can’t agree with you enough.
    *MY* email should be on *MY* system. I will never have it any other way.

  3. I sort of agree with Cody on this one.

    “It gives me peace of mind to know I’m in control of my access to my email.”

    I honestly have no clue what you’re talking about. Zero. As far as I know, if I fire up Outlook, I have to wait for my mail to be delivered to me. Now, correct me if I’m wrong but I think that means Outlook actually has to make a network connection to some box that has my mail on it. Who cares if that box is an exchange server or Google? You’re still in the same amount of control.

    Ok, so lets move away from the enterprise. What are my options now? Outlook magically giving me full control to my mail? Chances are my ISP is running an email server for me or I’m using a web-email with Outlook.

    If you want to argue that you have more control to access to your email over a local network connection as opposed to the Internet fine. But that’s a pretty lame argument if you ask me.

    Also, Robert it’s painfully obvious you don’t play video games. In Starcraft & Warcraft we could create our own games inside it. And in case you missed it, some one ported the original doom into doom 3: http://battleteam.net/tech/fis/

    And obviously Robert’s never heard of the Quake console, which has been there since v1.0: http://console.planetquake.gamespy.com/commands/quake.html#h-3

    Second Life is definitely interesting. But don’t act as if the gaming world hasn’t toyed with such ideas before it came along.

    And most importantly, what’s the coolest thing you wrote for second life (before you were banned)? Or were just praising it with minimal interaction?

  4. I sort of agree with Cody on this one.

    “It gives me peace of mind to know I’m in control of my access to my email.”

    I honestly have no clue what you’re talking about. Zero. As far as I know, if I fire up Outlook, I have to wait for my mail to be delivered to me. Now, correct me if I’m wrong but I think that means Outlook actually has to make a network connection to some box that has my mail on it. Who cares if that box is an exchange server or Google? You’re still in the same amount of control.

    Ok, so lets move away from the enterprise. What are my options now? Outlook magically giving me full control to my mail? Chances are my ISP is running an email server for me or I’m using a web-email with Outlook.

    If you want to argue that you have more control to access to your email over a local network connection as opposed to the Internet fine. But that’s a pretty lame argument if you ask me.

    Also, Robert it’s painfully obvious you don’t play video games. In Starcraft & Warcraft we could create our own games inside it. And in case you missed it, some one ported the original doom into doom 3: http://battleteam.net/tech/fis/

    And obviously Robert’s never heard of the Quake console, which has been there since v1.0: http://console.planetquake.gamespy.com/commands/quake.html#h-3

    Second Life is definitely interesting. But don’t act as if the gaming world hasn’t toyed with such ideas before it came along.

    And most importantly, what’s the coolest thing you wrote for second life (before you were banned)? Or were just praising it with minimal interaction?

  5. Hahahaha. I knew someone would mention Marissa Mayer. And who else but the chief evangelist and high priestess of Pine, Nancy McGough…

    I loved how you blogged about it, with all those juicy screencaps from 24. No doubt the reason why the chick in the picture has such a look of anxiety on her face is that she can’t figure out how to get Pine to filter all the spam she’s getting. ;-)

    But maybe she doesn’t share your philosophy on spam, which is apparently to NOT filter spam, don’t fight spam, just let it happen.

    The Marissa Mayer quotes are great too. She said she gets as many as 700 to 800 emails a day, so she needs something “fast.” (She didn’t say how many of the 800 emails were spam.)

    Of course even with the blazing speed of Pine, she still can’t keep on top of her 800 emails a day, so what does she do? Quote: “I do marathon e-mail catch-up sessions, sometimes on a Saturday or Sunday. I’ll just sit down and do e-mail for ten to 14 hours straight.”

    I suppose it’s a great email client if you’re like Marissa and you love killing 14 hours on a Saturday plowing through Viagra ads.

    Call me when they figure out that Ctrl-C means Copy and Ctrl-V means Paste….

  6. Hahahaha. I knew someone would mention Marissa Mayer. And who else but the chief evangelist and high priestess of Pine, Nancy McGough…

    I loved how you blogged about it, with all those juicy screencaps from 24. No doubt the reason why the chick in the picture has such a look of anxiety on her face is that she can’t figure out how to get Pine to filter all the spam she’s getting. ;-)

    But maybe she doesn’t share your philosophy on spam, which is apparently to NOT filter spam, don’t fight spam, just let it happen.

    The Marissa Mayer quotes are great too. She said she gets as many as 700 to 800 emails a day, so she needs something “fast.” (She didn’t say how many of the 800 emails were spam.)

    Of course even with the blazing speed of Pine, she still can’t keep on top of her 800 emails a day, so what does she do? Quote: “I do marathon e-mail catch-up sessions, sometimes on a Saturday or Sunday. I’ll just sit down and do e-mail for ten to 14 hours straight.”

    I suppose it’s a great email client if you’re like Marissa and you love killing 14 hours on a Saturday plowing through Viagra ads.

    Call me when they figure out that Ctrl-C means Copy and Ctrl-V means Paste….

  7. If all these email clients and servers supported a standard access protocol, e.g. IMAP, we wouldn’t need to have this conversation. IMHO, the #1 thing people can do to move email, and Internet messaging in general, forward is to just say no to clients and servers that don’t support open standard protocols.
    Amen!

  8. If all these email clients and servers supported a standard access protocol, e.g. IMAP, we wouldn’t need to have this conversation. IMHO, the #1 thing people can do to move email, and Internet messaging in general, forward is to just say no to clients and servers that don’t support open standard protocols.
    Amen!

  9. There’s a lot of FUD in this thread and, if forced to, I could write a long article refuting all the cluelessness, but for now I’ll refute two things:

    1. Pine does support tagging and has since version 4.60, which was released more than 2 years ago (2004 May 10). AFAIK, Pine is the only IMAP client that supports unlimited user-defined tags (aka labels or keywords).

    2. Someone in the corporate world *does* use Pine, namely Marissa Mayer, VP, Search Products and User Experience at Google. I blogged about this here:
    http://deflexion.com/2006/03/pine-in-fortune-magazine-and-on-tv

    If all these email clients and servers supported a standard access protocol, e.g. IMAP, we wouldn’t need to have this conversation. IMHO, the #1 thing people can do to move email, and Internet messaging in general, forward is to just say no to clients and servers that don’t support open standard protocols.

  10. There’s a lot of FUD in this thread and, if forced to, I could write a long article refuting all the cluelessness, but for now I’ll refute two things:

    1. Pine does support tagging and has since version 4.60, which was released more than 2 years ago (2004 May 10). AFAIK, Pine is the only IMAP client that supports unlimited user-defined tags (aka labels or keywords).

    2. Someone in the corporate world *does* use Pine, namely Marissa Mayer, VP, Search Products and User Experience at Google. I blogged about this here:
    http://deflexion.com/2006/03/pine-in-fortune-magazine-and-on-tv

    If all these email clients and servers supported a standard access protocol, e.g. IMAP, we wouldn’t need to have this conversation. IMHO, the #1 thing people can do to move email, and Internet messaging in general, forward is to just say no to clients and servers that don’t support open standard protocols.

  11. It’s $400 dolllars for the Microsoft Office 2003 Standard Edition.

    OpenOffice, AbiWord, Pine, Thunderbird, etc…FREE

    That’s $400 I don’t have to spend. So that’s one big reason why I hate Outlook, because of that fact.

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