Comments

  1. Jeteye CEO David Hayden Should Have Known Better

    What do you do when you are sitting on a conference call waiting for your interviewee to show up, but he never does?  Well, you record the questions and the really lousy muzak that is playing.  David Hayden, CEO of…

  2. Tom may have done more harm to himself, not so sure other CEO’s will want to be interviewed by him, they are probably worrying how Tom will sabotage the interview or make them look bad if they happen to do anything that could possibly miff Tom.

  3. Tom may have done more harm to himself, not so sure other CEO’s will want to be interviewed by him, they are probably worrying how Tom will sabotage the interview or make them look bad if they happen to do anything that could possibly miff Tom.

  4. People who have power should use it with more caution.

    Notice how Jon Stewart has changed his interviewing with celebrities? He was harsh and very critical in his earliest shows. I am sure people stopped coming to his shows.
    A podcaster needs more and more CEOs. Ofcourse CEOs need podcasters, too. :)

  5. People who have power should use it with more caution.

    Notice how Jon Stewart has changed his interviewing with celebrities? He was harsh and very critical in his earliest shows. I am sure people stopped coming to his shows.
    A podcaster needs more and more CEOs. Ofcourse CEOs need podcasters, too. :)

  6. I agree with Estelle. This may have been a career limiting move on Tom’s part. This is another example of how podcasters may not be taken seriously by the business world. Sure Dave should have kept his commitments, but maybe he had what he felt were more pressing issues to deal with.

  7. I agree with Estelle. This may have been a career limiting move on Tom’s part. This is another example of how podcasters may not be taken seriously by the business world. Sure Dave should have kept his commitments, but maybe he had what he felt were more pressing issues to deal with.

  8. I’m sorry but this is a hysterical commentary on power and the media.

    Perhaps you’re all right about Tom’s future with the C-level set… but how many of you had routinely listened to him prior to this clever move? I’ve heard his interviews before, and they’re pretty high-quality. I think this approach to being stood up is handled in a self-deprecating enough manner to comem across as amusing and not strictly an embittered journalist. I’m sure if the delay had been met with a resched or at least some apologizing (which in my opinion is required no matter how important or busy you become) he may not have reacted this way.

    Anyway, I’m obviously in the minority here. But I’ve been on both sides of this equation: plugging my book or my company, and sick and tired of hearing my own voice during an interview and wishing to god I didn’t have to give another performance. I’ve also been late for an interview or two myself, but never disrespectful. I think there’s a big difference.

    As a journalist, producer and podcaster, I’ve also been the interviewer of some pretty important VIP’s …and it’s more than a bit disheartening when you show up excited and well-prepared only to be greeted with that look that says, “You’re not the WSJ so remind me why my publicist set this %$#@! thing up??” Over time, we’ve built up a reputation and an audience and overcome that condecension. But when you’re starting out, it’s not for the faint of heart.

    IMHO, Tom’s response is a humorous breath of fresh air to the challenges of being a journalist, and a great survival strategy for pursuing access to people who often conflate their own inflluence and importance with a free pass on etiquette, civility and professionalism.

  9. I’m sorry but this is a hysterical commentary on power and the media.

    Perhaps you’re all right about Tom’s future with the C-level set… but how many of you had routinely listened to him prior to this clever move? I’ve heard his interviews before, and they’re pretty high-quality. I think this approach to being stood up is handled in a self-deprecating enough manner to comem across as amusing and not strictly an embittered journalist. I’m sure if the delay had been met with a resched or at least some apologizing (which in my opinion is required no matter how important or busy you become) he may not have reacted this way.

    Anyway, I’m obviously in the minority here. But I’ve been on both sides of this equation: plugging my book or my company, and sick and tired of hearing my own voice during an interview and wishing to god I didn’t have to give another performance. I’ve also been late for an interview or two myself, but never disrespectful. I think there’s a big difference.

    As a journalist, producer and podcaster, I’ve also been the interviewer of some pretty important VIP’s …and it’s more than a bit disheartening when you show up excited and well-prepared only to be greeted with that look that says, “You’re not the WSJ so remind me why my publicist set this %$#@! thing up??” Over time, we’ve built up a reputation and an audience and overcome that condecension. But when you’re starting out, it’s not for the faint of heart.

    IMHO, Tom’s response is a humorous breath of fresh air to the challenges of being a journalist, and a great survival strategy for pursuing access to people who often conflate their own inflluence and importance with a free pass on etiquette, civility and professionalism.

  10. LayZ,

    in my own post on this I mentioned that:

    I sat on the conference call line, patiently listening to the hold music, expecting him to arrive for over 17 minutes (I’m a little slow to catch on to these things!) but no-show. I emailed my contact, nothing. I called her, nothing. I re-checked my email and sure enough the time and numbers were correct.

    Now, if something had come up, I’m not a hard guy to get hold of. All my contact details are in the sidebar on the right and my blog is readily found in a Google search.

    My contact has since emailed with an apology but I haven’t heard from David at all (nor do I expect to at this point).

    I had spent a considerable amount of time preparing for this interview. I had re-scheduled it to yesterday at very short notice to accomodate David and then he didn’t show.

    I figured I might as well get a bit of a laugh, if nothing else, for the time and energy I spent on this.

  11. LayZ,

    in my own post on this I mentioned that:

    I sat on the conference call line, patiently listening to the hold music, expecting him to arrive for over 17 minutes (I’m a little slow to catch on to these things!) but no-show. I emailed my contact, nothing. I called her, nothing. I re-checked my email and sure enough the time and numbers were correct.

    Now, if something had come up, I’m not a hard guy to get hold of. All my contact details are in the sidebar on the right and my blog is readily found in a Google search.

    My contact has since emailed with an apology but I haven’t heard from David at all (nor do I expect to at this point).

    I had spent a considerable amount of time preparing for this interview. I had re-scheduled it to yesterday at very short notice to accomodate David and then he didn’t show.

    I figured I might as well get a bit of a laugh, if nothing else, for the time and energy I spent on this.

  12. Oops,

    forgot to also say thanks to Megan for the kind words and the support.

    On the career limiting comments – this was podcast no. 40 for PodLeaders. PodLeaders has published podcasts with Vint Cerf, Bruce Horn, Robert Scoble, Marc Canter, Steve Rubel, Jeff Clavier, Loic Le Meur, John Battelle, Niall Kennedy, Dave Sifry and Kevin Burton amongst others.

    I think PodLeader’s record as a quality content producer can stand one fun-poking podcast.

  13. Oops,

    forgot to also say thanks to Megan for the kind words and the support.

    On the career limiting comments – this was podcast no. 40 for PodLeaders. PodLeaders has published podcasts with Vint Cerf, Bruce Horn, Robert Scoble, Marc Canter, Steve Rubel, Jeff Clavier, Loic Le Meur, John Battelle, Niall Kennedy, Dave Sifry and Kevin Burton amongst others.

    I think PodLeader’s record as a quality content producer can stand one fun-poking podcast.

  14. Anyone who spends time reading Tom’s stuff knows he’s a fair and balanced reporter of fact. He rarely if ever dabbles in speculation, is very well connected and treats people with respect. He’s also kind and considerate with schmuks like me who aren’t the geekiest in the world.

    Tom did everything he could to make the show work and neither David nor his handlers had the decency or wit to communicate a delay. It’s not the worst sin in the world but it’s irksome nonetheless.

    If folk think that’s career limiting, then they must be of that school of thought that elevates CXOs to God like status. They’re not. They’re human. Like the rest of us.

    Folk would have had something to complain about if he’d taken David to task but he didn’t. He applied some Irish humour to the situation which I personally felt came off well.

    In a nansecond or two we’ll forget all about it and David will come back with a quip of his own. I hope.

  15. Anyone who spends time reading Tom’s stuff knows he’s a fair and balanced reporter of fact. He rarely if ever dabbles in speculation, is very well connected and treats people with respect. He’s also kind and considerate with schmuks like me who aren’t the geekiest in the world.

    Tom did everything he could to make the show work and neither David nor his handlers had the decency or wit to communicate a delay. It’s not the worst sin in the world but it’s irksome nonetheless.

    If folk think that’s career limiting, then they must be of that school of thought that elevates CXOs to God like status. They’re not. They’re human. Like the rest of us.

    Folk would have had something to complain about if he’d taken David to task but he didn’t. He applied some Irish humour to the situation which I personally felt came off well.

    In a nansecond or two we’ll forget all about it and David will come back with a quip of his own. I hope.

  16. Hey I interviewed David and he was very much on time, and we got a neat interview for Lifehack.org.

    Who knew? I suppose things can come up.

    One thing this does lightlight (parroting some of the above) is that new media doesn’t have some of the same built in hmm… requirements to play nice? And yes, maybe the Jon Stewart example is good.

    But, doesn’t this make it all more REAL? Politely *not* running the hold music interview means that no one would know this happened.

    David’s a nice guy, though. Just saying.

  17. Hey I interviewed David and he was very much on time, and we got a neat interview for Lifehack.org.

    Who knew? I suppose things can come up.

    One thing this does lightlight (parroting some of the above) is that new media doesn’t have some of the same built in hmm… requirements to play nice? And yes, maybe the Jon Stewart example is good.

    But, doesn’t this make it all more REAL? Politely *not* running the hold music interview means that no one would know this happened.

    David’s a nice guy, though. Just saying.

  18. Just a quick follow-up,

    I have had an email exchange with David and the first thing he said was

    I thought the no show podcast was pretty funny ;-)

    We have re-scheduled the interview.

    Good on you Dave for taking it in the spirit in which it was intended.

  19. Just a quick follow-up,

    I have had an email exchange with David and the first thing he said was

    I thought the no show podcast was pretty funny ;-)

    We have re-scheduled the interview.

    Good on you Dave for taking it in the spirit in which it was intended.

  20. [...] hello? anybody there? don’t fret! Podcaster Tom Raftery’s recent interview with hold music completely cracked me up.  <via Scoble>  I found it particularly funny because I once had a big boss who loved to hold conference calls in lieu of in person meetings.  He was just that busy.  The only problem was he rarely showed for the meetings, and since he was the conference leader, everyone always sat on the line listening to that groovy doo-doo-doo-doo elevator music for about 20 minute until we decided – via IM – that it was safe to hang up.  Talk about a great way to focus your team! As a recruiter, I’ve been stood up by candidates many times.  Comes with the territory.  But I’ve heard way more stories about candidates getting stood up by recruiters and interviewers.  You know … your interview is scheduled at 1pm, and you’ve been prepping all morning.  1:00 comes.  1:05 comes.  1:10 comes.  1:15 comes.  Yikes.  What are you to do? Well, below are a few tips.  (And no, even though it’s funny, one of them is not to record the hold music interviewing you.)  ;-) Grant a grace period.  Usually, you should set aside at least an hour for a phone interview anyway, and most phone interviews wrap up within 30 – 45 minutes.  So, as annoying as it is, give your interviewer a 15 minute grace period.  You know how meetings go; they always run over.  Set expectations.  Your interviewer has called, but she’s a bit late.  So late, in fact, that you’re worried you may not have that 45 minutes to devote before your next appointment.  Let her know.  Tell her that you set aside an hour for this interview, but you have a hard stop on the hour.  You’d be happy to talk now for as long as you can, or if it’s better, you’re happy to reschedule.  Interviews are important, but don’t let them derail your schedule or make you even more flustered. Notify someone … quickly.  Your grace period has passed, and all is still quiet.  If you have the contact info for your interviewer, shoot him a quick email or leave a message.  If you’re working with a recruiter, let your recruiter know what happened.  Missing the appointment was probably a complete oversight so be sure to raise a flag.  I’ve see so many candidates who never say a thing … so no one knows to reschedule! If now isn’t a good time, say so.  I threw this one in for an opposite situation:  Your interviewer or recruiter calls you out of the blue – no pre-set time – and expects you to engage in an on-the-spot interview.  JUST SAY NO … politely.  In my book, the one thing  worse than an interviewer missing an appointment is not setting an appointment at all.  Before you engage in any interviews or job discussions, you should be in a quiet, comfortable place.  If now is not a good time, that’s ok.  Politely let your interviewer know that you are tied up with something else right now, but you’re definitely interested and can proceed with the conversation at a mutually agreed upon time.  When these situations happen … late calls, no shows, spur-of-the-moment interviews … I often find innocent mistakes and ignorance are more to blame than anything.  While these acts can seem malicious or  like a “test,” it’s likely your interviewer is just busy … or not thinking properly.  It happens to the best of us. :) gretchen Published Tuesday, August 01, 2006 10:00 PM by gretchen Filed Under: Gretchen’s posts, Jobseeker tips [...]