Surprise of the month: Macs crash?

OK, I just purchased a Mac. A 17-inch MacBook Pro. I was forced into this by HD and wide-screen video formats. Windows Movie Maker doesn’t do it (it does on Windows Vista, but I can’t use beta software to run my business). Apple’s software does do HD today. I don’t even need to wait (there’s a reason why Microsoft’s Channel 9 and On10.net aren’t wide-screen or HD and it’s spelled Movie Maker). And, anyway, most of the video community here uses Macs (I learned a lot from watching Eddie and Ryanne edit their videos about FinalCut Pro). So, I’m going along for the ride. So, why am I posting this? Cause I just read about Dave Winer’s crashy experiences with his Mac.

Last week on the way home from Montana Ryanne was editing her video on her Mac. The app just suddenly disappeared from screen. In my book that’s called a crash. I found that to be very strange cause the hype on Macs is that they never crash. But, those commercials are so strong. The hype is so strong. That I believe that the Mac is perfect.

Ahhh, are the Mac faithful is Patrick Scoble ready for me getting a Mac? We’ll find out. Irina started calling him “lemming” because all he would do is talk about how cool Apple is all week. It does get tiresome, doesn’t it Irina? Maybe I’ll join Guy Kawasaki’s evangelistic hoardes. :-)

Don’t worry, this post was typed on a Tablet PC. All is not lost for the Windows faithful.

254 thoughts on “Surprise of the month: Macs crash?

  1. In Windows, applications going “poof” are, in my experience, always caused by one of two things.

    1. A stack overflow which in turn is usually caused by illegal recursion. If there is no more room in the stack, it can’t even execute the code to handle the error and show a nice dialog, etc., so rather than crap on even more memory it shouldn’t be, it gives up.

    2. A recursive exception, ie. an error happening when you handle an error, and then another when you handle that…

    It seems to me from what people are saying that Macs and Windows crash alike on the whole.

    If you get a stack overflow or recursive exception, it goes “poof”.

    If you get some other sort of fatal exception, you get Windows Error Reporting or Apple asking you to send it the a report.

    If it is in a kernel mode driver, you get a Blue Screen of Death or a beautiful Black Screen of Death (is this like the “sad mac”?).

    I don’t know what a kernel panic is…

    Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista are all based on the NT kernel and are very very very different than Windows 9x. Windows 9x has a shared memory space, therefore one naughty app can bring down the whole system.

    Mac OS X is based on UNIX and totally different from older Mac OS.

    Things have changed. Windows and Mac OS are not all that different any more, and except for little things, all this debate about who crashes more is silly.

  2. In Windows, applications going “poof” are, in my experience, always caused by one of two things.

    1. A stack overflow which in turn is usually caused by illegal recursion. If there is no more room in the stack, it can’t even execute the code to handle the error and show a nice dialog, etc., so rather than crap on even more memory it shouldn’t be, it gives up.

    2. A recursive exception, ie. an error happening when you handle an error, and then another when you handle that…

    It seems to me from what people are saying that Macs and Windows crash alike on the whole.

    If you get a stack overflow or recursive exception, it goes “poof”.

    If you get some other sort of fatal exception, you get Windows Error Reporting or Apple asking you to send it the a report.

    If it is in a kernel mode driver, you get a Blue Screen of Death or a beautiful Black Screen of Death (is this like the “sad mac”?).

    I don’t know what a kernel panic is…

    Windows NT/2000/XP/2003/Vista are all based on the NT kernel and are very very very different than Windows 9x. Windows 9x has a shared memory space, therefore one naughty app can bring down the whole system.

    Mac OS X is based on UNIX and totally different from older Mac OS.

    Things have changed. Windows and Mac OS are not all that different any more, and except for little things, all this debate about who crashes more is silly.

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