Does Kiko predict more Web 2.0 failures?

I was reading Don Dodge, former executive from Alta Vista. He’s seen his share of failure so I always learn something from him. Anyway, he links to an interesting analysis of why Kiko (a Web-based calendar) failed.

Heck, I’m nearly being forced to use Google Calendar and I really really really hate it (sorry, I’m an Outlook addict). If Google can’t get me excited about its calendar there’s no way that I’ll use a calendar from a company I’ve never heard of, don’t trust. Sorry. That’s the entrepreneur’s challenge. Google can win me over just by sheer momentum. Translation: my boss will say “you vil use Google and you vil like it.”

Actually I’m making Google sound worse than it is, but I need a calendar that synchs with my SmartPhone, that lets me work offline, etc.

A friend who works at Google says that they aren’t even using Google calendar internally right now. I hear that Google’s employees hate the Oracle-based solution they are currently using, but that Google Calendar needs more work to be usable for an enterprise.

I can tell you that is true. I’m using two calendars. One in Outlook, one in Google. Why? Cause the rest of the company is on Google.

Anyway, back to the headline. Does it predict more failures?

Yes.

There are simply too many companies chasing too few users.

I can not keep up with the flow in my email box. I’ll share some of that with you real soon.

Getting the cool kids to try your technology isn’t the same thing as having a long-term business proposition.

It’s my challenge too. If I don’t get an audience and keep it I’ll be laying myself off someday after our VC money runs out (that’s what I did last time the bubble burst).

Onward.

Note: some of these things will win. That’s why we all play the game. Google survived the last bubble&burst. Who’ll do that next time? Not Kiko.

116 thoughts on “Does Kiko predict more Web 2.0 failures?

  1. I think the main reason Kiko failed was impatience.

    Impatience by investors not letting the market for Web-based apps mature.

    I wrote a post about this. The apps out there are so rudimentary that we’re still in the feature checklist stage that we saw with word processors in the 1980s.

    Having an ecosystem of competing apps ensures that new features are tested out, dropped, or shared around.

    But it takes *time*. And I get the sense that we’re accelerating again; that there’s no room for the ‘two people who whipped up an app over the weekend’ and who’ll wait to see what happens.

    Keep killing off the geese and eventually you’ll kill the golden one, too.

  2. I think the main reason Kiko failed was impatience.

    Impatience by investors not letting the market for Web-based apps mature.

    I wrote a post about this. The apps out there are so rudimentary that we’re still in the feature checklist stage that we saw with word processors in the 1980s.

    Having an ecosystem of competing apps ensures that new features are tested out, dropped, or shared around.

    But it takes *time*. And I get the sense that we’re accelerating again; that there’s no room for the ‘two people who whipped up an app over the weekend’ and who’ll wait to see what happens.

    Keep killing off the geese and eventually you’ll kill the golden one, too.

  3. I think the main reason Kiko failed was impatience.

    Impatience by investors not letting the market for Web-based apps mature.

    I wrote a post about this. The apps out there are so rudimentary that we’re still in the feature checklist stage that we saw with word processors in the 1980s.

    Having an ecosystem of competing apps ensures that new features are tested out, dropped, or shared around.

    But it takes *time*. And I get the sense that we’re accelerating again; that there’s no room for the ‘two people who whipped up an app over the weekend’ and who’ll wait to see what happens.

    Keep killing off the geese and eventually you’ll kill the golden one, too.

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  6. Ok, then, I agree…

    think that a hi-rez video is the “killer” and most necessary feature.

    Yeah, funny that. I hear this endless shop-talk all the time with these supposed cutting-edge Videographers, never mind that seemingly no one cares or can play such high-res back. This from the ‘shoot-6-hours have-no-plan, fix-it-in-editing’ types. And I am not against a good look, 24P rocks my world, but the writing, the content is still king.

  7. Ok, then, I agree…

    think that a hi-rez video is the “killer” and most necessary feature.

    Yeah, funny that. I hear this endless shop-talk all the time with these supposed cutting-edge Videographers, never mind that seemingly no one cares or can play such high-res back. This from the ‘shoot-6-hours have-no-plan, fix-it-in-editing’ types. And I am not against a good look, 24P rocks my world, but the writing, the content is still king.

  8. Ok, then, I agree…

    think that a hi-rez video is the “killer” and most necessary feature.

    Yeah, funny that. I hear this endless shop-talk all the time with these supposed cutting-edge Videographers, never mind that seemingly no one cares or can play such high-res back. This from the ‘shoot-6-hours have-no-plan, fix-it-in-editing’ types. And I am not against a good look, 24P rocks my world, but the writing, the content is still king.

  9. Christopher, last I read Scoble is using iMovie not FCP.

    And my cheap comment has less to do with spending and more to do with lack of expertise and solid business practices. Experts know what the best tools are and use them. Good business practices tells you that you get a return on your investment. Amateurs on the other hand don’t know what the good tools are and woulden’t know how to use them to their advantage anyway and think that a hi-rez video is the “killer” and most necessary feature.

  10. Christopher, last I read Scoble is using iMovie not FCP.

    And my cheap comment has less to do with spending and more to do with lack of expertise and solid business practices. Experts know what the best tools are and use them. Good business practices tells you that you get a return on your investment. Amateurs on the other hand don’t know what the good tools are and woulden’t know how to use them to their advantage anyway and think that a hi-rez video is the “killer” and most necessary feature.

  11. Christopher, last I read Scoble is using iMovie not FCP.

    And my cheap comment has less to do with spending and more to do with lack of expertise and solid business practices. Experts know what the best tools are and use them. Good business practices tells you that you get a return on your investment. Amateurs on the other hand don’t know what the good tools are and woulden’t know how to use them to their advantage anyway and think that a hi-rez video is the “killer” and most necessary feature.

  12. It will be nice when the day comes that every person with an Internet connection has a chunk of remote, encrypted web space they can use to host apps, store data etc.

    Until then relying on some third party that doesn’t have a sustainable business model, to host your all important data, is plain crazy stuff.

    I touched briefly on this in my comment to this blog post http://libraryclips.blogsome.com/2006/08/03/surfulater-for-pim with relation to my product, Surfulater. I’ll keep my important information where I can touch it, secure it and back it up, thank you very much. I don’t think the Web 2.0 folks get this.

  13. It will be nice when the day comes that every person with an Internet connection has a chunk of remote, encrypted web space they can use to host apps, store data etc.

    Until then relying on some third party that doesn’t have a sustainable business model, to host your all important data, is plain crazy stuff.

    I touched briefly on this in my comment to this blog post http://libraryclips.blogsome.com/2006/08/03/surfulater-for-pim with relation to my product, Surfulater. I’ll keep my important information where I can touch it, secure it and back it up, thank you very much. I don’t think the Web 2.0 folks get this.

  14. It will be nice when the day comes that every person with an Internet connection has a chunk of remote, encrypted web space they can use to host apps, store data etc.

    Until then relying on some third party that doesn’t have a sustainable business model, to host your all important data, is plain crazy stuff.

    I touched briefly on this in my comment to this blog post http://libraryclips.blogsome.com/2006/08/03/surfulater-for-pim with relation to my product, Surfulater. I’ll keep my important information where I can touch it, secure it and back it up, thank you very much. I don’t think the Web 2.0 folks get this.

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