OK, OK, I was wrong about blogging

I’m taking a lot of heat for trying to hold bloggers to five rules.

I was wrong.

Stowe Boyd, who writes a bunch of words on a thing that DOES comply with my five rules, has the best rebuttal so far. Basically says “let it all hang out.”

Anyway, I’m all about inclusion. Being nice. Not being judgmental. Yesterday was when the egotistical elitist bbbaaahhhsssttttaaarrrrddd in me came out.

Onward.

60 thoughts on “OK, OK, I was wrong about blogging

  1. Wikipedia definition for blog: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog

    I scanned Robert’s posts on this matter and I think he was right to criticize Microsoft for misrepresenting their Live Spaces metrics. It’s dishonest and the purpose (attract advertisers) is pretty apparent. They’ll have a hard time (in the long-term) building a good product if they can’t get the early adopters and innovators to sign-on. Trying to define blogs (and basing the definition, in part, on an ancient ThinkWeek article) was where he made his mistake. Blogs, or more importantly blog authors, are evolving and that’s what we should be talking about.

    Blogging is evolving. If you’re not an A List blogger the masses aren’t going to tune into your blog with any real frequency. It’s hard to attract a sizeable audience so regular folks are focusing their conversations on the people they want to talk to and for the masses that’s friends and family. More and more private blogs are going private. There are lots of business blogs out there and bloggers blogging for cash or career but private bloggers aren’t trying to cast their nets wide anymore – they’re dropping individual lines. Products like VOX are going to be very popular because they’re giving the new blogger the tools they need to focus the conversation. Go VOX go.

    By the way, we should all thank the blog spammers for hurting traditional blog features like: commenting systems, trackback systems, and permalink systems.

    Cale Bruckner http://www.palmit.com (my blog)

    Related: http://www.palmit.com/archives/vox.html

  2. Wikipedia definition for blog: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blog

    I scanned Robert’s posts on this matter and I think he was right to criticize Microsoft for misrepresenting their Live Spaces metrics. It’s dishonest and the purpose (attract advertisers) is pretty apparent. They’ll have a hard time (in the long-term) building a good product if they can’t get the early adopters and innovators to sign-on. Trying to define blogs (and basing the definition, in part, on an ancient ThinkWeek article) was where he made his mistake. Blogs, or more importantly blog authors, are evolving and that’s what we should be talking about.

    Blogging is evolving. If you’re not an A List blogger the masses aren’t going to tune into your blog with any real frequency. It’s hard to attract a sizeable audience so regular folks are focusing their conversations on the people they want to talk to and for the masses that’s friends and family. More and more private blogs are going private. There are lots of business blogs out there and bloggers blogging for cash or career but private bloggers aren’t trying to cast their nets wide anymore – they’re dropping individual lines. Products like VOX are going to be very popular because they’re giving the new blogger the tools they need to focus the conversation. Go VOX go.

    By the way, we should all thank the blog spammers for hurting traditional blog features like: commenting systems, trackback systems, and permalink systems.

    Cale Bruckner http://www.palmit.com (my blog)

    Related: http://www.palmit.com/archives/vox.html

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