Stanford hospital invaded by “smart” cows

I was over at Stanford University Hospital today visiting Maryam’s mom, who had knee surgery. Anyway, two weeks ago they computerized their patient records. They have these portable data systems, all hooked in via wifi, all running Windows XP. They call them “cows.” Each one has a unique name. A nurse uses them to track patient data. Doctors can dial into the “cow” from his/her desk. Pretty cool stuff happening in hospitals lately.

Here Daisy Martinez, nurse¬†at the hospital,¬†shows off her “cow.”

Comments

  1. Hopefully this helps reduce the number of patients who get mixed-up with others (i.e. getting a new nose when they needed knee surgery).

    It would be funny if the computer “moo’ed” when a mistake was made!

  2. Hopefully this helps reduce the number of patients who get mixed-up with others (i.e. getting a new nose when they needed knee surgery).

    It would be funny if the computer “moo’ed” when a mistake was made!

  3. Right now, for infusion systems, if they’re smart enough…
    They’ll block you from putting in an absurd number (say, you type 6.0 instead of 0.6), which is better than an alert after you make the mistake.

    But I agree that it would be funny if it moo-ed. :)
    Maybe if it detects something that the system can’t pre-emptively block.

  4. Right now, for infusion systems, if they’re smart enough…
    They’ll block you from putting in an absurd number (say, you type 6.0 instead of 0.6), which is better than an alert after you make the mistake.

    But I agree that it would be funny if it moo-ed. :)
    Maybe if it detects something that the system can’t pre-emptively block.

  5. I didn’t like the term, anyway. It might have been more appropriate if we were running Gateways (do they still come in spotted boxes?).

    We tried to talk to them about tablets. Think a patient would ever complain of being called a tablet? Of course not!

  6. I didn’t like the term, anyway. It might have been more appropriate if we were running Gateways (do they still come in spotted boxes?).

    We tried to talk to them about tablets. Think a patient would ever complain of being called a tablet? Of course not!

  7. Does Stanford not submit any physician orders with theirs? That’s the primary function for our carts. From what I’m reading here, I’m starting to conclude that Stanford’s machines have more of a passive role (display information) than an active one. Not that there’s anything wrong with that!

  8. Does Stanford not submit any physician orders with theirs? That’s the primary function for our carts. From what I’m reading here, I’m starting to conclude that Stanford’s machines have more of a passive role (display information) than an active one. Not that there’s anything wrong with that!

  9. Overlake Medical Seattle (Bellevue) has this same sort of thing.

    The huge advantage is that admitting comes to you in the ER rather than you having to go to it…

  10. Overlake Medical Seattle (Bellevue) has this same sort of thing.

    The huge advantage is that admitting comes to you in the ER rather than you having to go to it…