Test from cell

Here is a test blog from my cell phone.

Edit: I was just playing around with some software that I can’t talk about yet. Unfortunately I don’t have a cell phone with a keyboard, so it makes this a lot less fun than it otherwise would be, but it’ll let me blog from places where I might not have my computer.

Just a test, this has only been a test, please move onto the next post. Thank you very much! This concludes this test of the cell phone broadcasting network. :-)

75 thoughts on “Test from cell

  1. I think that there are several points, Rob. No either-or here. Your point is one– blog anywhere, anywhen. Which is cool. Not necessarily what I want to do, but hey, I can see how it’s desireable and useful. (and thanks for the blogger mention; I’ll check it out)

    My point, thinking about what to do when the unthinkable happens, is another. I saw Scoble post this, thought about the idea I’ve got ruminating — a blogger field day where we all test out the less usual means of posting to blogs– and saw it fit right in.

    But my point piggybacks yours. You have the OPTION to blog when you want, using non-typical (seated before computer keyboard) means. Which option you’d really really like to use in case the whole joint gets shaken by an 8.0 quake.

    So, carry on. I’ll only hang out here to see if LayZ rousts him/herself from solely wanting examples to actually providing any about LayZ’s cel phone experience in NYC on 9/11.

  2. I think that there are several points, Rob. No either-or here. Your point is one– blog anywhere, anywhen. Which is cool. Not necessarily what I want to do, but hey, I can see how it’s desireable and useful. (and thanks for the blogger mention; I’ll check it out)

    My point, thinking about what to do when the unthinkable happens, is another. I saw Scoble post this, thought about the idea I’ve got ruminating — a blogger field day where we all test out the less usual means of posting to blogs– and saw it fit right in.

    But my point piggybacks yours. You have the OPTION to blog when you want, using non-typical (seated before computer keyboard) means. Which option you’d really really like to use in case the whole joint gets shaken by an 8.0 quake.

    So, carry on. I’ll only hang out here to see if LayZ rousts him/herself from solely wanting examples to actually providing any about LayZ’s cel phone experience in NYC on 9/11.

  3. I can’t beleive how some of you people are totally missing the point. Being able to blog from a phone like a T-Mobile MDA means that you can leave a laptop at home when you go to blog a conference or something. It also means that you can publicize anything you want, any time you want.

    Blogger has had mobile blogging available for a year or so. I just send an MMS (photos, audio, and text) to go@blogger.com and I’m done. I don’t use it that often (I will at PAX this weekend), but it’s great to know that if I want to leave the laptop behind, I can.

    It’s not a matter of being able or needing to blog in an emergency. It’s a matter of having the OPTION to blog whenever the fancy strikes you.

  4. I can’t beleive how some of you people are totally missing the point. Being able to blog from a phone like a T-Mobile MDA means that you can leave a laptop at home when you go to blog a conference or something. It also means that you can publicize anything you want, any time you want.

    Blogger has had mobile blogging available for a year or so. I just send an MMS (photos, audio, and text) to go@blogger.com and I’m done. I don’t use it that often (I will at PAX this weekend), but it’s great to know that if I want to leave the laptop behind, I can.

    It’s not a matter of being able or needing to blog in an emergency. It’s a matter of having the OPTION to blog whenever the fancy strikes you.

  5. LayZ,

    “I guess neither of you were in NYC trying to make a cell phone call during 9/11″

    You guess correctly. Would you add to your guess and your “waiting for examples” and provide some examples of your own? What it was like? What happened? What did you do? What were the results?

    Katrina comes the closest, but I’m not sure how effective that was in actually dealing with the hurricane.

    There’s also the Tsunami. I was at the BlogHer community assistance panel, where Dina Metha (from Mumbai, India) discussed best practices learned from the tsunami. She said SMS was instrumental to communication. There was also discussion of needed (and existing) technology for SMS to RSS and vice versa. Considering the lack of notification, had there been some way to get word out — in a two-way manner, not just cel-phone to blog, lives might have been saved.

    You mention “life or death situations” which defines the scope too narrowly, in my opinion. Whither blogging or phoning on flight 93. Emergency situations aren’t as narrow as that.

    I’m thinking about longer-near-term emergency. Where wide-scale damage from quake or tornado or hurricane or blizzard/ice storm takes out communication for an extended period of time.

    Comparing the effectiveness of making a phone call vs. texting/blogging on flight 93 and assumes that the emergency situation is isolated from an overall hit to infrastructure. I am thinking of situations where the hit to infrastructure is what prolongs emergency conditions for hours, days, weeks.

    I was just reading, for example, that the San Andreas Fault intersects the California Aqueduct in three places, and that should a quake breach that area, Southern California can be without Aqueduct water for 3-6 MONTHS. Obviously different from electricity or net, but an example of the scope of disruption. And one which would coincide with electricity, gas leaks, phone service.

    At that point, it may require too much bandwidth to place a synchronuos two-way call out. But text, with asynchronicity, can slip through.

    Plus, for families not at epicenter, the “I haven’t heard from her/him/them” perspective extends the state of “it’s life or death” for hours or days. Tho the ones caught at epicenter may have survived (no longer life or death), until word gets out to families and friends, it’s still life or death to them.

    “Help local people how?” Establishing communication, getting word out. Helps local people. “Tell ‘em I’m okay” is a help. Describing to world at large best way to communicate (send SMS messages) helps. The directNIC data center in New Orleans did have backup power. They used the net/chat/IM to get people on the outside to help ‘em research questions about how best to operate their generator. So a first outbound word may pose questions for those outside to answer and get back to those within. Or heck, to blog “we’re okay, we need help, tune in to ham radio frequency [blah]” to direct people to the reliable means of communication.

    Ultimately, you never know WHAT is going to happen. So the exercise of trying different ways to post to a blog, and setting all that stuff up beforehand increases one’s options when the worst hits. If the net routs around outages, all this is an attempt to try your own rout-arounds.

    Another point on the local level. I went to a city council meeting, post-Katrina — I’m in larger L.A. area, we have fires and earthquakes, not floods — and volunteered my services as a blogger in an emergency. Having done so, I figure that I’d best bone up on as many non-traditional ways to establish communication to outside world as possible. Which is a help to the local people.

  6. LayZ,

    “I guess neither of you were in NYC trying to make a cell phone call during 9/11″

    You guess correctly. Would you add to your guess and your “waiting for examples” and provide some examples of your own? What it was like? What happened? What did you do? What were the results?

    Katrina comes the closest, but I’m not sure how effective that was in actually dealing with the hurricane.

    There’s also the Tsunami. I was at the BlogHer community assistance panel, where Dina Metha (from Mumbai, India) discussed best practices learned from the tsunami. She said SMS was instrumental to communication. There was also discussion of needed (and existing) technology for SMS to RSS and vice versa. Considering the lack of notification, had there been some way to get word out — in a two-way manner, not just cel-phone to blog, lives might have been saved.

    You mention “life or death situations” which defines the scope too narrowly, in my opinion. Whither blogging or phoning on flight 93. Emergency situations aren’t as narrow as that.

    I’m thinking about longer-near-term emergency. Where wide-scale damage from quake or tornado or hurricane or blizzard/ice storm takes out communication for an extended period of time.

    Comparing the effectiveness of making a phone call vs. texting/blogging on flight 93 and assumes that the emergency situation is isolated from an overall hit to infrastructure. I am thinking of situations where the hit to infrastructure is what prolongs emergency conditions for hours, days, weeks.

    I was just reading, for example, that the San Andreas Fault intersects the California Aqueduct in three places, and that should a quake breach that area, Southern California can be without Aqueduct water for 3-6 MONTHS. Obviously different from electricity or net, but an example of the scope of disruption. And one which would coincide with electricity, gas leaks, phone service.

    At that point, it may require too much bandwidth to place a synchronuos two-way call out. But text, with asynchronicity, can slip through.

    Plus, for families not at epicenter, the “I haven’t heard from her/him/them” perspective extends the state of “it’s life or death” for hours or days. Tho the ones caught at epicenter may have survived (no longer life or death), until word gets out to families and friends, it’s still life or death to them.

    “Help local people how?” Establishing communication, getting word out. Helps local people. “Tell ‘em I’m okay” is a help. Describing to world at large best way to communicate (send SMS messages) helps. The directNIC data center in New Orleans did have backup power. They used the net/chat/IM to get people on the outside to help ‘em research questions about how best to operate their generator. So a first outbound word may pose questions for those outside to answer and get back to those within. Or heck, to blog “we’re okay, we need help, tune in to ham radio frequency [blah]” to direct people to the reliable means of communication.

    Ultimately, you never know WHAT is going to happen. So the exercise of trying different ways to post to a blog, and setting all that stuff up beforehand increases one’s options when the worst hits. If the net routs around outages, all this is an attempt to try your own rout-arounds.

    Another point on the local level. I went to a city council meeting, post-Katrina — I’m in larger L.A. area, we have fires and earthquakes, not floods — and volunteered my services as a blogger in an emergency. Having done so, I figure that I’d best bone up on as many non-traditional ways to establish communication to outside world as possible. Which is a help to the local people.

  7. You tech folks are mighty amusing.

    Does it have to be new to get you all hot & bothered? Is it not enough for Robert to allow you into the small as well as the large triumphs?

  8. You tech folks are mighty amusing.

    Does it have to be new to get you all hot & bothered? Is it not enough for Robert to allow you into the small as well as the large triumphs?

  9. @33 I guess neither of you were in NYC trying to make a cell phone call during 9/11.

    You cited examples of using a cell phone to notify people of your status. Calling someone, sending an SMS. I don’t see examples of where updating your blog is really a needed emergency service. I’m still waiting for examples of where is critical to be able to update your blog during an emergency.

    @29 If you classifying notifying the world via your blog that someone had a baby as an EMERGENCY, well, your bar is much lower than mine.

    On the runway? Huh? Why the hell wouldn’t you just CALL someone? I mean, I’m sure the people on Flight 93 wished they could have BLOGGECD about what was happening on their flight, rather than actually CALL someone. That would have been MUCH MORE effective, dontcha think?

    Again, looking for examples of NEEDING to BLOG from your cell phone DURING an EMERGENCY.

    Katrina comes the closest, but I’m not sure how effective that was in actually dealing with the hurricane. Someone thousands of miles away is reading your updates on the hurricane. That helps the local people…how?

  10. @33 I guess neither of you were in NYC trying to make a cell phone call during 9/11.

    You cited examples of using a cell phone to notify people of your status. Calling someone, sending an SMS. I don’t see examples of where updating your blog is really a needed emergency service. I’m still waiting for examples of where is critical to be able to update your blog during an emergency.

    @29 If you classifying notifying the world via your blog that someone had a baby as an EMERGENCY, well, your bar is much lower than mine.

    On the runway? Huh? Why the hell wouldn’t you just CALL someone? I mean, I’m sure the people on Flight 93 wished they could have BLOGGECD about what was happening on their flight, rather than actually CALL someone. That would have been MUCH MORE effective, dontcha think?

    Again, looking for examples of NEEDING to BLOG from your cell phone DURING an EMERGENCY.

    Katrina comes the closest, but I’m not sure how effective that was in actually dealing with the hurricane. Someone thousands of miles away is reading your updates on the hurricane. That helps the local people…how?

  11. Susan is right on that one. The last service to go and the first back up in a disaster is usually cellular. Everyone, including emergency workers, tend to use them.

  12. Susan is right on that one. The last service to go and the first back up in a disaster is usually cellular. Everyone, including emergency workers, tend to use them.

  13. LayZ @ 25: I’m thinking about large-scale natural disasters that take down a region’s infrastructure and services. (I’m also thinking about the person who blogged DURING Katrina from her Blackberry)

    So, say LA gets hit by the big 8.0 quake. Widescale disruptions, tons of power outages. Intermittent communication services. The infrastructure is damaged, and what does work is severely overloaded. I’m alive, sustained some damage, and want to report out. My site is hosted on a server elsewhere in the country; *it* still is running. If I can just get a message out. Any message, a short message. A post from a cel phone, using SMS or something along those lines, where a brief text message can slip out amid all the traffic overcrowding the services, might have a chance to get out there.

    (Now that I paint this scenario, I think I want to have an alternate email address or service that’s hosted from elsewhere. Gmail works for that (it’s in NorthernCalifornia vs. Southern California), but it doesn’t work like having and registering your own domain where you can create your super-secret email address to send emails to that’ll get posted on the blog.)

    I have a domain name, so I’ll prolly set up an account to do mail-to-blog and then send message to that mail address from my cel phone. Yes, it’s differnet from whatever it is that Robert tried out, but I’m assuming that it’s a similar idea.

  14. LayZ @ 25: I’m thinking about large-scale natural disasters that take down a region’s infrastructure and services. (I’m also thinking about the person who blogged DURING Katrina from her Blackberry)

    So, say LA gets hit by the big 8.0 quake. Widescale disruptions, tons of power outages. Intermittent communication services. The infrastructure is damaged, and what does work is severely overloaded. I’m alive, sustained some damage, and want to report out. My site is hosted on a server elsewhere in the country; *it* still is running. If I can just get a message out. Any message, a short message. A post from a cel phone, using SMS or something along those lines, where a brief text message can slip out amid all the traffic overcrowding the services, might have a chance to get out there.

    (Now that I paint this scenario, I think I want to have an alternate email address or service that’s hosted from elsewhere. Gmail works for that (it’s in NorthernCalifornia vs. Southern California), but it doesn’t work like having and registering your own domain where you can create your super-secret email address to send emails to that’ll get posted on the blog.)

    I have a domain name, so I’ll prolly set up an account to do mail-to-blog and then send message to that mail address from my cel phone. Yes, it’s differnet from whatever it is that Robert tried out, but I’m assuming that it’s a similar idea.

  15. >>Email doesn’t work cause you can’t tag via email.

    It could if you parsed for it and had software to support it.

    Start your email with

    For the record my webpage had a section that would display messages from my phone (an old Nextel) back in 1999. Then in 2003 I had a whole blog that I did completely with my Sidekick. http://www.greenjem.com/blog/

    It’s a lot easier now.

  16. >>Email doesn’t work cause you can’t tag via email.

    It could if you parsed for it and had software to support it.

    Start your email with

    For the record my webpage had a section that would display messages from my phone (an old Nextel) back in 1999. Then in 2003 I had a whole blog that I did completely with my Sidekick. http://www.greenjem.com/blog/

    It’s a lot easier now.

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