Have I lost my “blog power”?

Anand M., in India, asks “has Scoble lost his blog power?” (I linked to him and he didn’t get many visits). My read? If I ever did have blog power, it’s gone now. Digg and TechMeme have all the power now.

I think Rageboy has the clue to what’s going on here (the yawning baby cracked Maryam up). I’m boring. Haven’t been linking to enough cool people and cool tech. Too much inbred inside-the-blogosphere, linking. Or, maybe, I’ve been doing too much linking and not enough first-hand-experience. Translation: not enough lists. Sorry. It’s hard to do good blogging when you’re busy all day long. Sigh.

But, Steve Gillmor has it right: this isn’t a game of traffic. It’s about sharing what you love. I love using tech and studying the product of geeks. Whether or not anyone is listening isn’t the reason I’m doing this (sometimes I forget that, yeah, but getting a link from Digg isn’t worth as much as everyone makes it seem). My passion? Trying out new stuff, finding new problems to solve. I haven’t been doing enough of that lately cause I’m just inside an email tidal storm that I can’t get off of me. Seriously, you have no idea how hard it is to keep up with email. I’m failing, and failing horribly. Sorry if I haven’t gotten back to you. Leave a comment instead of emailing.

The flow that’s happening in my life is simply incredible, especially when I compare it to what was going on in my life in 2002 when I worked at UserLand. Back then there were so few companies, very few interesting things going on. Today there’s SO much. I’m not surprised that it’s harder to get people to click on a link.

I was talking with Chris Messina and Tara Hunt on email tonight and said that just the number of events that’s happening in just the San Francisco area is stunning. I can’t keep up. It makes me just want to grab a bottle of wine and go sit on the beach out by the Ritz. Which is why I missed Barcamp this year. I just wanted a small, manageable conversation with a handful of geeks. It was SO enjoyable.

I’m thinking back on the last year and what I really remember and find special. That Swiss Chalet with a handful of geeks. That was it. Out of all the conferences (many expensive, like Mix06 where I had my own Las Vegas suite). All the PR. All the noise. All the events. Getting, what, five guys together in a Swiss Chalet for a weekend was the highlight of the year.

I wonder if we can have more of those types of experiences? I find I learn a lot more from conversations like that, and it helps me out cause then I have something interesting to say to you all.

The power of four people talking is something that’s just fascinated me all week.

Anyway, that’s enough of that. Everyone is getting bored, even me.

111 thoughts on “Have I lost my “blog power”?

  1. Robert,

    I’m sorry but our influence largely comes from the people we keep company with. When you were with Microsoft, you were a window (pun intended) into the inside of Microsoft. Now? Microsoft does have many other blogs, but they have a very “corporate” feel. Yours did not. Now you represent a very small company that may or may not have an impact in the near future.

    I am sad to say that I don’t much care about what your new employer is doing. Video is video. It’s the content that matters of course. Podcasting isn’t yet doing things I care about, and that does make you somewhat less interesting to me. That’s a PITY.

  2. Robert,

    I’m sorry but our influence largely comes from the people we keep company with. When you were with Microsoft, you were a window (pun intended) into the inside of Microsoft. Now? Microsoft does have many other blogs, but they have a very “corporate” feel. Yours did not. Now you represent a very small company that may or may not have an impact in the near future.

    I am sad to say that I don’t much care about what your new employer is doing. Video is video. It’s the content that matters of course. Podcasting isn’t yet doing things I care about, and that does make you somewhat less interesting to me. That’s a PITY.

  3. Robert,

    Don’t be so hard on yourself. You’re still as great a blogger as ever. It’s not you.

    It’s the BRAND.

    Before, you were the uncensored voice of Microsoft. You were more than the fly on the wall of MS. You were the guy who let the world know all the cool things MS was doing, and a lot of the stuff they weren’t. Who else could ask for Flickr in Redmond or tell us the real deal on Origami?

    The same thing would happen to Matt Cutts — another fantastic blogger whose popularity correlates directly to his role at Google. Take Matt out of the plex and he would still write great stuff and do videos on SEO. A big part of his appeal, though, is his ability to provide the real scoop on Big Daddy and tap into the massive Google Brain Trust. You’ve got a tougher road than, say, journalists who leave a major daily because their sources don’t dry up.

    It’s really tough to scoop someone who’s 100% dedicated to getting a story in the mass media — or a Drudge-like “blog-as-business.” Plus, they can guarantee their sources wide distribution and in most cases syndication. You’ve got a business to run now and I’m sure revenue targets to meet as a direct result of your daily efforts.

    You and Matt have created your own brands and have a group of readers who will continue to follow you no matter where you go or what you do.

    You’re like any player who gets traded by the Yankees. In pinstripes, they’re the guys everybody loves to hate. Once out of the hated Yankees uniform, they can still be great players but they’re not going to generate the same buzz in the media.

    I may be wrong, but to find out, let’s check in with Alex Rodriguez in a few years. In pinstripes, he’s the most hated player in baseball even by his own fans. A day doesn’t go by when he’s not under the microscope in a way he never was as a lone Ranger.

  4. Robert,

    Don’t be so hard on yourself. You’re still as great a blogger as ever. It’s not you.

    It’s the BRAND.

    Before, you were the uncensored voice of Microsoft. You were more than the fly on the wall of MS. You were the guy who let the world know all the cool things MS was doing, and a lot of the stuff they weren’t. Who else could ask for Flickr in Redmond or tell us the real deal on Origami?

    The same thing would happen to Matt Cutts — another fantastic blogger whose popularity correlates directly to his role at Google. Take Matt out of the plex and he would still write great stuff and do videos on SEO. A big part of his appeal, though, is his ability to provide the real scoop on Big Daddy and tap into the massive Google Brain Trust. You’ve got a tougher road than, say, journalists who leave a major daily because their sources don’t dry up.

    It’s really tough to scoop someone who’s 100% dedicated to getting a story in the mass media — or a Drudge-like “blog-as-business.” Plus, they can guarantee their sources wide distribution and in most cases syndication. You’ve got a business to run now and I’m sure revenue targets to meet as a direct result of your daily efforts.

    You and Matt have created your own brands and have a group of readers who will continue to follow you no matter where you go or what you do.

    You’re like any player who gets traded by the Yankees. In pinstripes, they’re the guys everybody loves to hate. Once out of the hated Yankees uniform, they can still be great players but they’re not going to generate the same buzz in the media.

    I may be wrong, but to find out, let’s check in with Alex Rodriguez in a few years. In pinstripes, he’s the most hated player in baseball even by his own fans. A day doesn’t go by when he’s not under the microscope in a way he never was as a lone Ranger.

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