The most evil team at Microsoft: the WAVE team

Hey, the Channel 9 team found one of my old videos that didn’t get run and it’s a good one. I’m sure it took a while to get it past the PR team — when I shot it earlier this year I thought to myself “this will never make it to the public.”

Why?

Cause it’s the team that builds not only the audio and video functionality in Windows Vista, but it’s also the team that builds (play Jaws movie soundtrack here please) the DRM technologies.

Yes, it’s the most evil team at Microsoft. Damn, and they have a good conversation with me about DRM. We even talk about Cory Doctorow (who hates DRM). At about 19:00 into it the intersections of the interests are mapped out by Steve Ball. “They don’t always align.” That’s PM speak for “they hate each other.”

Oh and don’t miss the demo of Windows Vista’s audio features at 34:40. This is a MAJOR reason why I can’t wait to use Vista, particularly for making videos.

Note: I don’t really think this team is evil, but it shows you the business pressures that teams at Microsoft are under and shows you a little bit about how teams come up with things like DRM technologies.

I hope the Vista team has a bunch more demos like the one at 34:40, too. That was the first time I thought to myself that I had to have Vista. One demo. Now imagine if they have a ton of demos like that?

Comments

  1. Business Pressure my arse, MSFT doesn’t have to listen to the music industry or movie industry.you and I know that the DRM methods won’t work and never will.

  2. Business Pressure my arse, MSFT doesn’t have to listen to the music industry or movie industry.you and I know that the DRM methods won’t work and never will.

  3. The existence of DRM is less of an issue for me than the blatant BS about Microsoft being “open” when they refuse to allow WM to be fully functional on !Microsoft platforms.

    But they blather on, blatantly lying about being anything but a way to force you to windows.

    Yet they wonder why no one trusts any part of Microsoft other than the Xbox and the MacBU teams.

    Gee, I *can’t imagine* why.

  4. The existence of DRM is less of an issue for me than the blatant BS about Microsoft being “open” when they refuse to allow WM to be fully functional on !Microsoft platforms.

    But they blather on, blatantly lying about being anything but a way to force you to windows.

    Yet they wonder why no one trusts any part of Microsoft other than the Xbox and the MacBU teams.

    Gee, I *can’t imagine* why.

  5. Robert,

    Of course, I have no idea what you are talking about, Robert. But I wanted to touch base with you and I hear emailing you is just silly. I did want to let you know that I have been taking some videos. If you get a spare moment (Hah! Right.) I would love any suggestions you may have. My goal is to get something up every day, eventually. Right now I am just dealing with a huge learning curve for me and having a lot of fun. Thank you so much for opening this world for me.

    Sincerely,

    Heather Flanagan
    http://www.peoplegeek.tv.

  6. Robert,

    Of course, I have no idea what you are talking about, Robert. But I wanted to touch base with you and I hear emailing you is just silly. I did want to let you know that I have been taking some videos. If you get a spare moment (Hah! Right.) I would love any suggestions you may have. My goal is to get something up every day, eventually. Right now I am just dealing with a huge learning curve for me and having a lot of fun. Thank you so much for opening this world for me.

    Sincerely,

    Heather Flanagan
    http://www.peoplegeek.tv.

  7. Letsee, after being wined, dined and PR handheld by Google, you now think they are “different”, and then going wishy washy on DRM and starting up some Vista pre-hype, even post-Microsoft, with the usual false humility ‘I am boring’ (but I really just need to feel the love) tact.

    Yah, are so predictable… ;)

  8. Letsee, after being wined, dined and PR handheld by Google, you now think they are “different”, and then going wishy washy on DRM and starting up some Vista pre-hype, even post-Microsoft, with the usual false humility ‘I am boring’ (but I really just need to feel the love) tact.

    Yah, are so predictable… ;)

  9. Business pressure, for who?

    It’s obvious that Microsoft is the one who’ll rip the benefits in the long term.

    The worse thing that can happen for computer users is a world where WMA is the only music file format allowed to play under Microsoft+labels conditions. Because when that happens, those companies will have enough weight to stop MP3 player manufacturers from being allowed to ship products that consumers want.

    If you think this cannot possibly happen, you are living in a fantasy land.

  10. Business pressure, for who?

    It’s obvious that Microsoft is the one who’ll rip the benefits in the long term.

    The worse thing that can happen for computer users is a world where WMA is the only music file format allowed to play under Microsoft+labels conditions. Because when that happens, those companies will have enough weight to stop MP3 player manufacturers from being allowed to ship products that consumers want.

    If you think this cannot possibly happen, you are living in a fantasy land.

  11. Why the need to the word Excellence in the team name? Shouldn’t any team always strive for excellence? Or are they replacing the team which has been doing audio video for all these years? The Windows Audio Video Mediocrity team. :)

  12. Why the need to the word Excellence in the team name? Shouldn’t any team always strive for excellence? Or are they replacing the team which has been doing audio video for all these years? The Windows Audio Video Mediocrity team. :)

  13. The search for a better feed reader continues..

    Admit it, you are a blog junkie, well so am I. And what gifts do we have to follow our favorite blog and news sites than feeds (RSS, Atom, etc, etc). I’ve always mentioned that the RSS feed is one of the most innovative discoveries of our time, a…

  14. My word Robert! You do put up with a lot of nonsense from your visitors!! I hate to see blogs become outlets for character assassinations, “flaming” and the like under the guise of dmeocatization. Those of you who post comments should stick to the knitting (like web technology) and stop questioning Robert’s motives, state-of-mind, yada yada. Some who post comments remind me of the cowards that flip me when I take a second more to skiddaddle at a red light. Come out of you protective basements–show yourself for all your virtues with a link to you, your name and your profile. Here is something that will probably piss you off. Robert manages THE most popular personal blog on the web. He is famous. His fame is not waning, it is gaining. It’s not just clicks and comments–it’s also buzz. Real conversation. I see his name everywhere on the web. I hear people drop his name persistenly. If this creates envy it’s not his problem. But truly try not to let your weaknesses rise lest you lose your own veracity. Robert, I enjoy your blogs to the mth degree–I learn much from your POVs. And you do it with grace, honesty and style–and hilarity. I worry that blogging will descend into Hades where grace is non-existent, on satellite radio with Howard Stern. Democracy gone wild. Oh and while some of you start questioning my motives, I am a pure fan. Hope that does not get your knickers in a tasmanian knot. And please don’t use valuable real estate on Robert’s blog to vent your self-hatred. My daughter calls it “levelling”. Look it up.

  15. My word Robert! You do put up with a lot of nonsense from your visitors!! I hate to see blogs become outlets for character assassinations, “flaming” and the like under the guise of dmeocatization. Those of you who post comments should stick to the knitting (like web technology) and stop questioning Robert’s motives, state-of-mind, yada yada. Some who post comments remind me of the cowards that flip me when I take a second more to skiddaddle at a red light. Come out of you protective basements–show yourself for all your virtues with a link to you, your name and your profile. Here is something that will probably piss you off. Robert manages THE most popular personal blog on the web. He is famous. His fame is not waning, it is gaining. It’s not just clicks and comments–it’s also buzz. Real conversation. I see his name everywhere on the web. I hear people drop his name persistenly. If this creates envy it’s not his problem. But truly try not to let your weaknesses rise lest you lose your own veracity. Robert, I enjoy your blogs to the mth degree–I learn much from your POVs. And you do it with grace, honesty and style–and hilarity. I worry that blogging will descend into Hades where grace is non-existent, on satellite radio with Howard Stern. Democracy gone wild. Oh and while some of you start questioning my motives, I am a pure fan. Hope that does not get your knickers in a tasmanian knot. And please don’t use valuable real estate on Robert’s blog to vent your self-hatred. My daughter calls it “levelling”. Look it up.

  16. Robert, you might have been using the “evil” word as a bit of humor… But, I take offense. I know it is cool these days to attack DRM and those who work with it, but what is lost in all this is the simple fact that DRM was originally created by people (like me) who were trying to make things easier for customers… The fact that the technology has been used to do stupid things is not an inherent attribute of the technology nor an indication of the moral weakness of those who designed it, rather, the problem comes in how people use it. It’s sort of like with guns… “DRM isn’t bad, it is the the people who use it that is the problem.”

    I have an interest in this subject since I am the sole inventor on four of the oldest US Patents in the area of DRM. I was also involved in some of Microsoft’s earliest discussions of DRM. (Microsoft co-sponsored the submission of my DDSLA system to the Open Software Foundation back in the late 80′s…) Someday, perhaps soon, I’m going to have to write a blog post about this, however, “back in the old days” when we were working on the early DRM systems, the whole point of the process was to make it easier for customers to purchase software, manage it, and deploy it. You may question, as I do, what people have done with DRM after it was created, but you should recognize that in most cases, the problems aren’t with the folk who create the technology — rather, the problem is with those that decide how to use it in products.

    I helped create the field of DRM but I’m not “evil.” I suspect that the folk on Microsoft’s DRM technology team aren’t evil either.

    bob wyman

  17. Robert, you might have been using the “evil” word as a bit of humor… But, I take offense. I know it is cool these days to attack DRM and those who work with it, but what is lost in all this is the simple fact that DRM was originally created by people (like me) who were trying to make things easier for customers… The fact that the technology has been used to do stupid things is not an inherent attribute of the technology nor an indication of the moral weakness of those who designed it, rather, the problem comes in how people use it. It’s sort of like with guns… “DRM isn’t bad, it is the the people who use it that is the problem.”

    I have an interest in this subject since I am the sole inventor on four of the oldest US Patents in the area of DRM. I was also involved in some of Microsoft’s earliest discussions of DRM. (Microsoft co-sponsored the submission of my DDSLA system to the Open Software Foundation back in the late 80′s…) Someday, perhaps soon, I’m going to have to write a blog post about this, however, “back in the old days” when we were working on the early DRM systems, the whole point of the process was to make it easier for customers to purchase software, manage it, and deploy it. You may question, as I do, what people have done with DRM after it was created, but you should recognize that in most cases, the problems aren’t with the folk who create the technology — rather, the problem is with those that decide how to use it in products.

    I helped create the field of DRM but I’m not “evil.” I suspect that the folk on Microsoft’s DRM technology team aren’t evil either.

    bob wyman

  18. Nice video Robert, good to see the faces behind the DRM.

    This technology is going to enable you and me to make a nickel from every download of quality content we create, its not just about the movie moguls and record company fat cats.

  19. Nice video Robert, good to see the faces behind the DRM.

    This technology is going to enable you and me to make a nickel from every download of quality content we create, its not just about the movie moguls and record company fat cats.

  20. Bob: good point. I don’t see anyone on this team as evil. They are responding to a business request and, personally, if I were in their shoes I’d do the same.

    By the way, true evil is not done in the eye of a video camera. That’s one reason I’m so happy this team finally got up on the Web. The work they do is actually very interesting.

    The headline is a bit over the top, though. Sorry about that. Me? I’ve learned stuff like that gets people to pay attention.

  21. Bob: good point. I don’t see anyone on this team as evil. They are responding to a business request and, personally, if I were in their shoes I’d do the same.

    By the way, true evil is not done in the eye of a video camera. That’s one reason I’m so happy this team finally got up on the Web. The work they do is actually very interesting.

    The headline is a bit over the top, though. Sorry about that. Me? I’ve learned stuff like that gets people to pay attention.

  22. I don’t think the DRM team at Microsoft is particularly more evil than any other division. The whole company relies on criminality as a business process. You can’t get any more evil than that!

  23. I don’t think the DRM team at Microsoft is particularly more evil than any other division. The whole company relies on criminality as a business process. You can’t get any more evil than that!

  24. “Business pressure” is a nice excuse for implementing things that make it a pain in the ass to use content you legitimately paid for and have fair use rights over. “I was just following orders.” Where have we heard that before, Robert?

  25. “Business pressure” is a nice excuse for implementing things that make it a pain in the ass to use content you legitimately paid for and have fair use rights over. “I was just following orders.” Where have we heard that before, Robert?

  26. They don’t rely on criminality as much as they do on misdirection and deception. There’s a difference.

    Court transcripts and guilty verdicts tell a different story. But yeah, there is a difference.

  27. They don’t rely on criminality as much as they do on misdirection and deception. There’s a difference.

    Court transcripts and guilty verdicts tell a different story. But yeah, there is a difference.

  28. I come to the conclusion that you didnt wait to drink the kool aid, you went ahead and swallowed the Kool Aid powder.

  29. I come to the conclusion that you didnt wait to drink the kool aid, you went ahead and swallowed the Kool Aid powder.

  30. Hey Robert, I’m on the WAVE team. I’m not evil.

    The video was the program managers on the WAVE team, not the developers :)

    More seriously, DRM technology is a platform feature. Content owners insist that the platform have certain protections (DRM) before they’ll license their content for playback on that platform. It’s that simple. You can sell CD’s without DRM, you can sell DVD’s without DRM (I just burned a DRM-free DVD this evening, I could sell it if anyone wanted to pay to watch my son’s “Singing on Stage” class final performance). Heck, I suspect you can even sell HD-DVDs and BLU-RAY DVD’s without DRM (not sure about that, I don’t know how the licensing of them works).

    It’s the owners of the content who decide what (if any) restrictions are applied to the content.

  31. Hey Robert, I’m on the WAVE team. I’m not evil.

    The video was the program managers on the WAVE team, not the developers :)

    More seriously, DRM technology is a platform feature. Content owners insist that the platform have certain protections (DRM) before they’ll license their content for playback on that platform. It’s that simple. You can sell CD’s without DRM, you can sell DVD’s without DRM (I just burned a DRM-free DVD this evening, I could sell it if anyone wanted to pay to watch my son’s “Singing on Stage” class final performance). Heck, I suspect you can even sell HD-DVDs and BLU-RAY DVD’s without DRM (not sure about that, I don’t know how the licensing of them works).

    It’s the owners of the content who decide what (if any) restrictions are applied to the content.

  32. But it’s Microsoft that decides that they will force anyone wanting to watch modern versions of WM on to Microsoft platforms, then deride all other DRM formats as “closed” when what they mean is “not WM”.

    It’s the insistance on doublespeak that makes me really despise WM.

    That and what they charge just for the streaming servers. Pfah.

  33. But it’s Microsoft that decides that they will force anyone wanting to watch modern versions of WM on to Microsoft platforms, then deride all other DRM formats as “closed” when what they mean is “not WM”.

    It’s the insistance on doublespeak that makes me really despise WM.

    That and what they charge just for the streaming servers. Pfah.

  34. It’s the owners of the content who decide what (if any) restrictions are applied to the content.

    Larry, and it’s your monopolist employer’s choice to follow along. Ever heard of DVD John? I know you have.

    You DO NOT need to support DRM in order to play back content. Just once, Microsoft could have used its status as a monopoly to actually drive the industry towards a pro-consumer direction. You could have just refused to “play along” (pardon the pun).

    Instead, we get this and junk talk about “platform features”. I don’t hear many Windows end-users asking for HDCP in order to play back HD content. That’s just bullshit. What is DRM but simply a limit on consumer freedom to playback the content they have just because they purchased it in a particular format. That’s evil, and anybody who’s a part of enabling that is doing evil for a paycheck.

  35. It’s the owners of the content who decide what (if any) restrictions are applied to the content.

    Larry, and it’s your monopolist employer’s choice to follow along. Ever heard of DVD John? I know you have.

    You DO NOT need to support DRM in order to play back content. Just once, Microsoft could have used its status as a monopoly to actually drive the industry towards a pro-consumer direction. You could have just refused to “play along” (pardon the pun).

    Instead, we get this and junk talk about “platform features”. I don’t hear many Windows end-users asking for HDCP in order to play back HD content. That’s just bullshit. What is DRM but simply a limit on consumer freedom to playback the content they have just because they purchased it in a particular format. That’s evil, and anybody who’s a part of enabling that is doing evil for a paycheck.

  36. Marie Germain, I am not one of the commenters who regularly calls Robert on his faults, real or perceived. However, I must say that I’ve always found sycophancy such as yours more offensive than an overfondness of putdowns. One knows that the person doing the brownnosing can’t possibly be sincere and probably wants something in return for all that ass kissing. So, here’s some advice for you, the advice giver, you’ve got virtual poop on your nose, wipe it.

    I think that the anti-DRM people are so vocal on blogs that they create the impression that most folks are opposed to DRM. That is NOT true. DRM is basically an effort to guarantee that people are paid for their work instead of having said work ripped off. The average consumer is not opposed to that at all. The EFF’s campaign to convince folks that they have a gripe they don’t have is fated to fail.

  37. Marie Germain, I am not one of the commenters who regularly calls Robert on his faults, real or perceived. However, I must say that I’ve always found sycophancy such as yours more offensive than an overfondness of putdowns. One knows that the person doing the brownnosing can’t possibly be sincere and probably wants something in return for all that ass kissing. So, here’s some advice for you, the advice giver, you’ve got virtual poop on your nose, wipe it.

    I think that the anti-DRM people are so vocal on blogs that they create the impression that most folks are opposed to DRM. That is NOT true. DRM is basically an effort to guarantee that people are paid for their work instead of having said work ripped off. The average consumer is not opposed to that at all. The EFF’s campaign to convince folks that they have a gripe they don’t have is fated to fail.

  38. no podesta, DRM is heavily invested method of controlling a customer’s product. what he can do with HIS product that he bought. do you have DRM in cars? the owners can take parts out, study them and even improve them. does FORD,Toyota try to clamp down those technologies? no. the movie and music industry will eventually learn the hard way.

  39. no podesta, DRM is heavily invested method of controlling a customer’s product. what he can do with HIS product that he bought. do you have DRM in cars? the owners can take parts out, study them and even improve them. does FORD,Toyota try to clamp down those technologies? no. the movie and music industry will eventually learn the hard way.

  40. DRM is basically an effort to guarantee that people are paid for their work instead of having said work ripped off. The average consumer is not opposed to that at all.

    Show me how the average consumer can “DRM” his or her own content via Windows Vista. Show me that this is being used.

    The DRM’d content right now is the stuff consumers buy – DVD’s, music – and is used to limit their ability to reproduce it for other electronics in their home. DRM provides no benefit to the end-consumer, not even lower prices for purchased content.

  41. DRM is basically an effort to guarantee that people are paid for their work instead of having said work ripped off. The average consumer is not opposed to that at all.

    Show me how the average consumer can “DRM” his or her own content via Windows Vista. Show me that this is being used.

    The DRM’d content right now is the stuff consumers buy – DVD’s, music – and is used to limit their ability to reproduce it for other electronics in their home. DRM provides no benefit to the end-consumer, not even lower prices for purchased content.

  42. DRM is basically an effort to guarantee that people are paid for their work instead of having said work ripped off.

    Limewire and the rest ask “How’s that working for you”. Not so good.

    DRM is the way for RIAA and MPAA to get to their promised land, the ONLY thing they care about:

    Making you pay every time you listen, in perpetuity. They could give a rat’s ass about the artists, or “protecting” copyright. That’s all bullshit. What they want is to make you pay them every time you listen or view to any form of media, and they want to make it an inherent part of the hardware so that there’s no physical, nor technological way for you to NOT pay.

    What they want is an end to free content in any form.

    Microsoft makes a lot of money by playing that tune. I just wish they’d stop trying to make it sound like they’re doing us a favor.

  43. DRM is basically an effort to guarantee that people are paid for their work instead of having said work ripped off.

    Limewire and the rest ask “How’s that working for you”. Not so good.

    DRM is the way for RIAA and MPAA to get to their promised land, the ONLY thing they care about:

    Making you pay every time you listen, in perpetuity. They could give a rat’s ass about the artists, or “protecting” copyright. That’s all bullshit. What they want is to make you pay them every time you listen or view to any form of media, and they want to make it an inherent part of the hardware so that there’s no physical, nor technological way for you to NOT pay.

    What they want is an end to free content in any form.

    Microsoft makes a lot of money by playing that tune. I just wish they’d stop trying to make it sound like they’re doing us a favor.

  44. Obviously, I disagree with all three or four of you. Here’s why:

    DRM does me no harm, nor does it harm other consumers. Most of my digital content is, of course, from CDs I own or owned. However, I do buy content from the iTunes Music Store. It is protected by Apple’s Fairplay DRM. I can:

    • Play it on multiple computers (up to five)

    • Play it on multiple iPods

    • Back it up to CDs or hard drives

    • Rip the music to MP3 files on CDs or in my iTunes libraries

    • Store it in a digital locker

    I can also play my content on any OS, proving that iTunes is not monopolistic.

    Truth of the matter is that most iPod owners and iTunes users do not have a complaint about DRM. We acceot it as a part of being able to purchase music, television shows, and, soon, movies, digitally, As I said before, that’s a gripe a few soreheads are trying to impose on the average consumer.

  45. Obviously, I disagree with all three or four of you. Here’s why:

    DRM does me no harm, nor does it harm other consumers. Most of my digital content is, of course, from CDs I own or owned. However, I do buy content from the iTunes Music Store. It is protected by Apple’s Fairplay DRM. I can:

    • Play it on multiple computers (up to five)

    • Play it on multiple iPods

    • Back it up to CDs or hard drives

    • Rip the music to MP3 files on CDs or in my iTunes libraries

    • Store it in a digital locker

    I can also play my content on any OS, proving that iTunes is not monopolistic.

    Truth of the matter is that most iPod owners and iTunes users do not have a complaint about DRM. We acceot it as a part of being able to purchase music, television shows, and, soon, movies, digitally, As I said before, that’s a gripe a few soreheads are trying to impose on the average consumer.

  46. Really Podesta? Okay, go play DRM’d iTunes content on Linux. You have fun with that.

    Also, you can’t directly rip DRM’d iTMS purchases to MP3 CDs. You have to burn it to Audio CDs, then re-rip it to MP3. A minor set of steps, and there is some loss in fidelity, but you can’t just go from .m4p to .mp3 directly.

    While Apple is more open about the platforms you can play iTMS purchases on than Microsoft is, (Apple supports three actually: Windows, Mac OS X, and Motorola, whereas Microsoft and WM only support 1: Microsoft), as of yet, they still don’t support Linux or any other Unix for that matter.

    So they’re better by far than anything the Windows Media team can try to PR away, but they’re far from letting you play your iTMS purchases on “any” OS.

    Do keep the facts in mind here, hmm?

  47. Really Podesta? Okay, go play DRM’d iTunes content on Linux. You have fun with that.

    Also, you can’t directly rip DRM’d iTMS purchases to MP3 CDs. You have to burn it to Audio CDs, then re-rip it to MP3. A minor set of steps, and there is some loss in fidelity, but you can’t just go from .m4p to .mp3 directly.

    While Apple is more open about the platforms you can play iTMS purchases on than Microsoft is, (Apple supports three actually: Windows, Mac OS X, and Motorola, whereas Microsoft and WM only support 1: Microsoft), as of yet, they still don’t support Linux or any other Unix for that matter.

    So they’re better by far than anything the Windows Media team can try to PR away, but they’re far from letting you play your iTMS purchases on “any” OS.

    Do keep the facts in mind here, hmm?

  48. John, I have no desire to play Fairplay DRM content in Linux. But, if I did, there are hacks that would allow me to. As an open source leader recently said, the problem here is with the open source community. It needs to get over itself and cooperate with some purveyors of proprietary software. It could start with iTunes.

    My greater point is that the people who complain loudly and consistently about DRM are:

    1) Peer to peer types who don’t want to pay for anything; or

    2) Open source folks upset over their marginalization in comparison to Apple; or

    3) People who don’t use iTMS or other download services, often for generational reasons. They are carping about something that they are theoretically opposed to.

    The people who use iTMS are, generally, happy campers.

  49. John, I have no desire to play Fairplay DRM content in Linux. But, if I did, there are hacks that would allow me to. As an open source leader recently said, the problem here is with the open source community. It needs to get over itself and cooperate with some purveyors of proprietary software. It could start with iTunes.

    My greater point is that the people who complain loudly and consistently about DRM are:

    1) Peer to peer types who don’t want to pay for anything; or

    2) Open source folks upset over their marginalization in comparison to Apple; or

    3) People who don’t use iTMS or other download services, often for generational reasons. They are carping about something that they are theoretically opposed to.

    The people who use iTMS are, generally, happy campers.

  50. Hacks don’t really count for the purpose of this. YOu cannot just play .m4p music on Linux without circumventing the DRM and therefore violating the terms of the license agreement.

    As well, your opinion on the people who are against DRM is stereotyped and rather inaccurate.

  51. Hacks don’t really count for the purpose of this. YOu cannot just play .m4p music on Linux without circumventing the DRM and therefore violating the terms of the license agreement.

    As well, your opinion on the people who are against DRM is stereotyped and rather inaccurate.

  52. Podesta, you forgot some…

    People who complain loudly and consistently about DRM are:

    Creators of digital works, that don’t want controls slapped without their permission.

    People to whom have had their paid-content stolen back, when it fails to identify a device. Audible owes me $150 plus. Will I ever see it? No.

    Regular consumers that hate to fiddle. Average Joes complain, beeeeeeeeeelive me. People don’t want geek complexity and DRM fiddlings.

    People who bought Sony malware CDs. Umm, me. And others that have had DRM wreck havoc on other technologies.

    Anyone who has ever used MS Reader… ;)

    Fortune 500′s to which a flawed product activation scheme caused serious havoc. (WGA and others). And Turbotax for consumers.

    DRM systems that double as spyware…

    Asset Managers, Archivists, Historians, Academic Community…

    Victims of misapplied, over-aggressive and wrongheaded DMCA suits.

    Should I go on?

  53. Podesta, you forgot some…

    People who complain loudly and consistently about DRM are:

    Creators of digital works, that don’t want controls slapped without their permission.

    People to whom have had their paid-content stolen back, when it fails to identify a device. Audible owes me $150 plus. Will I ever see it? No.

    Regular consumers that hate to fiddle. Average Joes complain, beeeeeeeeeelive me. People don’t want geek complexity and DRM fiddlings.

    People who bought Sony malware CDs. Umm, me. And others that have had DRM wreck havoc on other technologies.

    Anyone who has ever used MS Reader… ;)

    Fortune 500′s to which a flawed product activation scheme caused serious havoc. (WGA and others). And Turbotax for consumers.

    DRM systems that double as spyware…

    Asset Managers, Archivists, Historians, Academic Community…

    Victims of misapplied, over-aggressive and wrongheaded DMCA suits.

    Should I go on?

  54. Or maybe it’s just anoying to buy songs on the iTMS and then have to convert them to mp3 to be able to play them on my mp3 player. This is in my opinion the biggest problem. My wife has an iPod so no problem for her, but I have an mp3 player, so i need to go through the pain to convert to be able to play. I bought the song, so i should be able to play. Make iTunes play nice with other music players, but nope, DRM gets in the way, so I have to convert. No problem for me other than a bit of time lost, but for joe average end use, i guess it means if you want to buy from iTMS, you better buy an iPod, or no play. Imagine if we had to convert cd’s to be able to listen on the brand of cd player we have, or we’d have to convert dvd’s before we were able to watch em on tv (something that needs doing if you want to watch region 1 on our region 2 players and you aren’t as lucky as me to have a region free dvd player). I’d say DRM is not a step forward at all. It just gets in the way of ease of use for the customer.

  55. Or maybe it’s just anoying to buy songs on the iTMS and then have to convert them to mp3 to be able to play them on my mp3 player. This is in my opinion the biggest problem. My wife has an iPod so no problem for her, but I have an mp3 player, so i need to go through the pain to convert to be able to play. I bought the song, so i should be able to play. Make iTunes play nice with other music players, but nope, DRM gets in the way, so I have to convert. No problem for me other than a bit of time lost, but for joe average end use, i guess it means if you want to buy from iTMS, you better buy an iPod, or no play. Imagine if we had to convert cd’s to be able to listen on the brand of cd player we have, or we’d have to convert dvd’s before we were able to watch em on tv (something that needs doing if you want to watch region 1 on our region 2 players and you aren’t as lucky as me to have a region free dvd player). I’d say DRM is not a step forward at all. It just gets in the way of ease of use for the customer.

  56. Media, Art, Marketing, The Constitution and Life in General

    The current state of copyright (Sonny Bono CTEA, DMCA) law is corrupt and insidiously evil. DRM conflicts with the very reason that the Constitution’s framers offered IP protection, namely to promote ‘Progress of Science and Useful Arts’. All creati…

  57. [...] The most evil team at Microsoft have really outdone themselves this time, it seems. But I have a feeling they’re going to show us all more of what they are capable of in the near future. Those of you who are stupid enough to buy DRM ‘protected’ content, are going to wake up from a very bad dream in the future. Like Demerjian also reported, even Microsoft’s own future product, called Zune, will not play older DRM ‘protected’ content because it does not support it. This is exactly what you were all warned about. When I buy music, I want to be able to play it on every device, whenever and where ever I want. Even if it’s after 10 years. And that goes for all other content like movies as well. [...]