Speaking of PR problems…Cisco traffic jam still causing conversations

The Cisco traffic jam continues to harm the reputations of Cisco party planners. I have a few friends who work at Cisco and they are — more than a week later — still livid about how their company handled their annual party. One worker there told me she was stuck in traffic for more than two hours and decided to simply turn around and go home.

So, what happened? Well, 11,000 Cisco employees were told to go to Shoreline for its company meeting. The thing is Shoreline isn’t designed for that kind of traffic inflow during rush hour. It messed up the commutes of many people, particularly those who work at Google.

But internally workers are still stewing. It’s amazing that they took an event that was supposed to generate postive morale but turned it into really negative feelings toward the company.

Lesson for other companies who are thinking of doing parties or corporate meetings? Get busses. Don’t schedule stuff like this for rush hour. Make sure there are plenty of traffic controls. Microsoft gives lots of incentives to take busses to its events in Seattle.

Ahh, the drama that goes on in Silicon Valley.

Almost makes me wonder why we didn’t have big parties at Shoreline on behalf of Microsoft?

Anyway, I wonder if the Del.icio.us party on October 3 in Sunnyvale will cause similar traffic jams? Probably more cause Del.icio.us is a cool way to bookmark your favorite stuff.

Day 17

The investors speak.

Ahh, so as long as the stench stays contained to the boardroom the investors were willing to ignore it, but as the stench seeps out from under the boardroom door and into the CEO’s office the shareholders decided to get out. Interesting.

HP’s CEO is holding a press conference in about an hour. I wonder if he can clear the air and make that smell move somewhere else?

At the Ragan PR conference the HP problem is a topic of conversation here. I just sat through a session of “PR winners and sinners.” Sinners being folks like Vice President Dick Cheney who shot his friend in the face while hunting. Winners being people like Kyra Phillips, CNN anchor who accidentally took a microphone into the bathroom and then went on David Letterman to redeem herself.

Anyway, I’m getting bored by talking about HP. I’d rather link to Beet.TV who has discovered that Google Video now has a capability for captioning. That’s cool.

I’m off to Chicago’s airport to catch a flight back to California. Stay out of trouble and, remember, no matter how flawed your life is or how sucky a job you have it still is far better than being an HP PR member right now.

The Fattest RSS Feeds

One thing I really like about an offline feed reader is that you don’t need to read feeds all the time. Just store them up like a squirrel stores nuts. Then go on a feed reading binge. I use NewsGator for Outlook (it brings all my feeds into Outlook so I can read my feed items offline — most of this post was written using Windows Live Writer at 33,000 feet on the United Flight yesterday to Chicago).

I have an admission to make: I haven’t read any feeds since about 8/18. That’s why my blog has sucked lately. I haven’t been discovering the new little things that people tell me they liked most about my blog. Anyone can talk about HP and how messed up its board is, right? But who will read more than 100 feeds for you and find some cool nugget?

Anyway, one thing I noticed when I looked at my feeds for the first time yesterday is that most of my favorite bloggers publish more than my less favorite bloggers. A lot more. Let’s look at the top posters in my RSS reading list:

Boing Boing. 701 posts since I last read my feeds.
Engadget. 1093.
GigaOM. 466.
Lost Remote. 408.
Make Magazine. 395.
MSDN Blogs. 2886. (not really fair, cause there’s a few thousand people on there, these are Microsoft’s employee blogs).
Life Hacker. 552.
TechCrunch. 212
TechDirt. 278.
TechNet Blogs. 1454. (same problem as MSDN blogs, this one is another group of Microsoft bloggers).
I published 273 items in the same time.

Disclaimer, these numbers aren’t quite for the same time period. Some I hadn’t been reading for a longer period of time. But they are representative of the “fattest” feeds.

Whew, that’s a lot of blogs to read through.

A good comparison is my favorite Microsoft technical blogger, Raymond Chen, only posted about 50 things in the same time. And that’s a lot more frequent than many other feeds.

Interesting, on another, but sorta associated, topic: Maryam, my wife has written her first stab at “10 ways to create a killer blog.”

Me? I think I’d just focus on what a blogger is passionate about. That’s where it all starts. Yeah, there are things you can do to get into Google, or TechMeme, or iTunes, but if that’s how you look at life you won’t be interesting anyway.

Hell, what makes for a good blog? How about some hotel bed jumping? I’m lying in a hotel bed right now. I’m tempted. Heheh. Thanks to Tim Bray for that one.

Anyway, I gotta get some sleep. I’m on stage in a few hours.