More Photowalking with Thomas Hawk

Cool, all four parts of the Photowalking tour with Thomas Hawk are up on the ScobleShow. We’re also looking for other photographers to walk around with. Must be located within driving distance of San Francisco — for now.

In the second segment, it is fun watching Thomas get wet and then get on the ground to get some unique shots. Love that lens cleaning technique too!

In the third segment we go dark. Low light shooting of the Golden Gate bridge. In the fourth segment we go into the city for some urban photography.

Would love to know what you think, especially if you have a digital SLR camera. Is this kind of stuff useful or interesting? What would you like to see us shoot in the future? Models? Scenery? In a studio? Wine country? Gold country? Beaches? Sports?
Thomas has more, including links to the photos he made during this session, on his blog.

Out of all the stuff that I’ve done, for even the shows that’ll come up in a couple of weeks, this is my favorite. I wonder if you agree?

Comments

  1. Scoble,

    I agree, most interesting sofar, the way you set it up, it is like I can have a chat with a great photographer.

    Made me think of ‘photography and the art of seeing’, which is a very nice book that deals with photography from a non-technical / hardware / technique perspective …… If you are gonna do more photowalking then I think it is interesting to even lower the techtalk and focus more on ‘the art of seeing’

    Looking forward to the other episodes of this walk!

    Sj@ko

  2. Scoble,

    I agree, most interesting sofar, the way you set it up, it is like I can have a chat with a great photographer.

    Made me think of ‘photography and the art of seeing’, which is a very nice book that deals with photography from a non-technical / hardware / technique perspective …… If you are gonna do more photowalking then I think it is interesting to even lower the techtalk and focus more on ‘the art of seeing’

    Looking forward to the other episodes of this walk!

    Sj@ko

  3. Hi Robert

    First of all: I love the Photowalking videos! I’m not a profesional not even a real amateur but I know what ISO means! :-)

    Here are some of my thoughts/ideas that I got when I watched them:
    - It’s really cool when you show Thomas taking pictures and then show the actual picture. You should do that even more (but I guess that involves quite some post processing).
    - At a certain point you were talking about taking pictures with a camera phone. Why not give Thomas (besides his pro camera) an average point-and-shoot camera like most people have. It would be great to see the differences between the profesional equipment and the point-and-shoot camera. Even more intresting would be hearing Thomas talking about how to make the shots taken with the point-and-shoot camera better.
    - Or take the previous point even further: have an additional geek walking with you (read non-profesional photographer), give him/her a point-and-shoot camera and let him/her take pictures from the same spots Thomas is taking pictures (that is what I would do when I had a chance to walk with Thomas).
    - It would be nice to see the pictures taken during the walks. I know Thomas has them on Flickr/Zooomr and you even posted some links on your blog, but having them as external links for people that just visit Podtech would be nicer I think.
    - Why are your videos in MOV format? I really don’t like the Quicktime player and I can’t play them on any of my mobile devices…

    Once again, congrats to both of you and keep up the good work!

    Jan

  4. Hi Robert

    First of all: I love the Photowalking videos! I’m not a profesional not even a real amateur but I know what ISO means! :-)

    Here are some of my thoughts/ideas that I got when I watched them:
    - It’s really cool when you show Thomas taking pictures and then show the actual picture. You should do that even more (but I guess that involves quite some post processing).
    - At a certain point you were talking about taking pictures with a camera phone. Why not give Thomas (besides his pro camera) an average point-and-shoot camera like most people have. It would be great to see the differences between the profesional equipment and the point-and-shoot camera. Even more intresting would be hearing Thomas talking about how to make the shots taken with the point-and-shoot camera better.
    - Or take the previous point even further: have an additional geek walking with you (read non-profesional photographer), give him/her a point-and-shoot camera and let him/her take pictures from the same spots Thomas is taking pictures (that is what I would do when I had a chance to walk with Thomas).
    - It would be nice to see the pictures taken during the walks. I know Thomas has them on Flickr/Zooomr and you even posted some links on your blog, but having them as external links for people that just visit Podtech would be nicer I think.
    - Why are your videos in MOV format? I really don’t like the Quicktime player and I can’t play them on any of my mobile devices…

    Once again, congrats to both of you and keep up the good work!

    Jan

  5. I think the camera walk pieces are definitely the best of the bunch on the first episode of the Scoble show. It might have been better if they had been broken down into smaller bite-size chunks, but that would be a comment about many of the items on the show. I did like the way he took a shot and then you showed the actual picture. As for other subject matter, there are plenty of other flickr photographers in and about the Bay area with different styles you could do something similar with (aqui ali, deborah lattimore spring to mind)…

  6. I think the camera walk pieces are definitely the best of the bunch on the first episode of the Scoble show. It might have been better if they had been broken down into smaller bite-size chunks, but that would be a comment about many of the items on the show. I did like the way he took a shot and then you showed the actual picture. As for other subject matter, there are plenty of other flickr photographers in and about the Bay area with different styles you could do something similar with (aqui ali, deborah lattimore spring to mind)…

  7. Hi Robert,

    I only saw the first part video, will watch the others later.

    I am an amateur photographer, using a Canon Digital SLR and have been following’s Thomas’ blog so I am familiar with his photography.

    I really liked the video as it gives you a different feel for the poeple involved (You and Thomas) than just reading your blogs.

    One thing I did notice was the sound, Thomas was very clear but when you were asking questions, the sound was not as good. Since you are doing quite a bit of talking yourself, you should maybe have a microphone too…

    What I liked in the first video was some of the more technical facts about his photography. When he mentionned that he was using ISO800, I was surprised, I would have used a lower ISO myself so next time I am out and shooting in similar conditions, I will bump it up. This is something I would not have gotten from just a blog and a picture. Now I could relate more easily as I had a video of the moment, which is not quite like being there but it is better than just a text.

    I do not have any special “request” personnaly, I think any subject he shoots can be interesting and I am sure to lear more from such video.

    Keep up the good work, I will keep watching.

  8. Hi Robert,

    I only saw the first part video, will watch the others later.

    I am an amateur photographer, using a Canon Digital SLR and have been following’s Thomas’ blog so I am familiar with his photography.

    I really liked the video as it gives you a different feel for the poeple involved (You and Thomas) than just reading your blogs.

    One thing I did notice was the sound, Thomas was very clear but when you were asking questions, the sound was not as good. Since you are doing quite a bit of talking yourself, you should maybe have a microphone too…

    What I liked in the first video was some of the more technical facts about his photography. When he mentionned that he was using ISO800, I was surprised, I would have used a lower ISO myself so next time I am out and shooting in similar conditions, I will bump it up. This is something I would not have gotten from just a blog and a picture. Now I could relate more easily as I had a video of the moment, which is not quite like being there but it is better than just a text.

    I do not have any special “request” personnaly, I think any subject he shoots can be interesting and I am sure to lear more from such video.

    Keep up the good work, I will keep watching.

  9. I use a Canon SLR myself and it’s surely interesting to see what practices people like Thomas have – like using his (long) prime lens for many shots, something I tend to do too (perhaps more for monetary reasons – good zooms are expensive – but anyway).
    One of the few videoblogs/’vodcasts’ I ever had the patience for sitting through – but probably mainly of interest for the photogeeks?

  10. I use a Canon SLR myself and it’s surely interesting to see what practices people like Thomas have – like using his (long) prime lens for many shots, something I tend to do too (perhaps more for monetary reasons – good zooms are expensive – but anyway).
    One of the few videoblogs/’vodcasts’ I ever had the patience for sitting through – but probably mainly of interest for the photogeeks?

  11. Well, this is the one videocast that finally has some value, Scoble.

    As for furture stuff, techniques on flash would be cool.

    Jan, it’s not the camera that makes the difference, it’s the photographer. I gotta believe Hawk would take the same quality photo with a P&S camera as he would with an SLR. An SLR just gives you more flexibility, but not necessarily better pictures.

  12. Well, this is the one videocast that finally has some value, Scoble.

    As for furture stuff, techniques on flash would be cool.

    Jan, it’s not the camera that makes the difference, it’s the photographer. I gotta believe Hawk would take the same quality photo with a P&S camera as he would with an SLR. An SLR just gives you more flexibility, but not necessarily better pictures.

  13. Robert.

    I like these the best so far. This is a topic that a larger audience will like, more so than interviews with CEO’s. I really liked the photowalking because I did not know what ISO is, and now I know. Sounds like a good setting I should start to mess around with on my cheap Nikkon cool pix. This is a good thing, as I was really wondering what that setting was for.

    It was also fun to watch you get inspired and try out some different settings/angles/shots on your new digital video camera. I liked how you explained what you were doing so we got a feel of the differences between settings.

    I also loved the totally cheezy music at the beginning. That is some classic “community access show” music. I think it works well.

  14. Robert.

    I like these the best so far. This is a topic that a larger audience will like, more so than interviews with CEO’s. I really liked the photowalking because I did not know what ISO is, and now I know. Sounds like a good setting I should start to mess around with on my cheap Nikkon cool pix. This is a good thing, as I was really wondering what that setting was for.

    It was also fun to watch you get inspired and try out some different settings/angles/shots on your new digital video camera. I liked how you explained what you were doing so we got a feel of the differences between settings.

    I also loved the totally cheezy music at the beginning. That is some classic “community access show” music. I think it works well.

  15. LayZ: watching Thomas work, though, I realize that many of his images are made much better because of the equipment he uses. I couldn’t make many of those images with my Nikon S1 point and shoot. The lens is simply too slow to take pictures in low light like what we were shooting in.

  16. LayZ: watching Thomas work, though, I realize that many of his images are made much better because of the equipment he uses. I couldn’t make many of those images with my Nikon S1 point and shoot. The lens is simply too slow to take pictures in low light like what we were shooting in.

  17. Thanks to all for such kind comments about this serious. I’ve always believed that there are three primary things that go into a photograph.

    1. The actual equipment. My 5D definitely helps me get a better shot. Back in the film days the pros who shoot with with Hasselblads had a good chance of getting better images than pros who shot with other cameras. You also can’t over estimate the glass. Lenses count for so much. Using prime Canon L Series Lenses can really change what you get out of your camera. Equipment isn’t everything for sure, but it does count.

    2. The post processing. The images ranged from black and white to extreme contrast and saturation shots. I shoot all my images in RAW format which gives me a great deal of control in photoshop afer the fact. It’s remarkable how different a photograph can look from the time it comes straight out of the camera through the finished process.

    3. The photographer. Certainly part of the equation involves the photographer. How well he or she knows and can use his or her gear, their eye, their ability to be aggresive in taking shots at times while being passive at other times to get certain human elements of casual interactive photography. Their choice of angles, getting low, getting high, shooting from the hip, etc.

    For more tips and my own ideas on digital photography you can check out this post that I wrote a while back called 10 tips for the new digital SLR user. There are a lot of great comments on the post with people offering their own tips as well.

    http://thomashawk.com/2006/04/10-tips-for-new-digital-slr.html

    Thanks a lot Robert and I’m definitely looking forward to doing more of these.

    In terms of some good other local photographers I’d recommned John Curley, SFBuckaroo, Deborah Latimore, Cole Rise, Aqui-Ali, Sam Bloomberg-Rissman (he should be back from Spain shortly), Jacob Appelbaum, Derek Powazek (Derek would be interesting as he could talk about his relaunch of JPG Magazine as well), Heather Champ, Scott Beale, Andy Frazer, Joe Reifer, 4Pizon (Bob), Tim Gasperak, Mark Interrante, Bernie DeChant (Razorbern) and Wirehead. There are lots more that I know I’m forgetting, but all of those above are doing super interesting things with digital photography right now.

    Another idea would be to do some photowalking series too when you are outside of the Bay Area. Let me know if you are headed somewhere and I can give you some good names.

  18. Thanks to all for such kind comments about this serious. I’ve always believed that there are three primary things that go into a photograph.

    1. The actual equipment. My 5D definitely helps me get a better shot. Back in the film days the pros who shoot with with Hasselblads had a good chance of getting better images than pros who shot with other cameras. You also can’t over estimate the glass. Lenses count for so much. Using prime Canon L Series Lenses can really change what you get out of your camera. Equipment isn’t everything for sure, but it does count.

    2. The post processing. The images ranged from black and white to extreme contrast and saturation shots. I shoot all my images in RAW format which gives me a great deal of control in photoshop afer the fact. It’s remarkable how different a photograph can look from the time it comes straight out of the camera through the finished process.

    3. The photographer. Certainly part of the equation involves the photographer. How well he or she knows and can use his or her gear, their eye, their ability to be aggresive in taking shots at times while being passive at other times to get certain human elements of casual interactive photography. Their choice of angles, getting low, getting high, shooting from the hip, etc.

    For more tips and my own ideas on digital photography you can check out this post that I wrote a while back called 10 tips for the new digital SLR user. There are a lot of great comments on the post with people offering their own tips as well.

    http://thomashawk.com/2006/04/10-tips-for-new-digital-slr.html

    Thanks a lot Robert and I’m definitely looking forward to doing more of these.

    In terms of some good other local photographers I’d recommned John Curley, SFBuckaroo, Deborah Latimore, Cole Rise, Aqui-Ali, Sam Bloomberg-Rissman (he should be back from Spain shortly), Jacob Appelbaum, Derek Powazek (Derek would be interesting as he could talk about his relaunch of JPG Magazine as well), Heather Champ, Scott Beale, Andy Frazer, Joe Reifer, 4Pizon (Bob), Tim Gasperak, Mark Interrante, Bernie DeChant (Razorbern) and Wirehead. There are lots more that I know I’m forgetting, but all of those above are doing super interesting things with digital photography right now.

    Another idea would be to do some photowalking series too when you are outside of the Bay Area. Let me know if you are headed somewhere and I can give you some good names.

  19. Robert – I thoroughly enjoyed the Thomas Hawk photo series. I’m a big fan of his photos and it’s great to see the creative and technical process behind it. Looking forward to more photo walking episodes.

  20. Robert – I thoroughly enjoyed the Thomas Hawk photo series. I’m a big fan of his photos and it’s great to see the creative and technical process behind it. Looking forward to more photo walking episodes.

  21. I like this series by far and away the best of what you’ve done so far. Here’s why:

    1) It showcases a great photographer who is unlikely to be featured on mainstream TV but deserves to be showcased nevertheless.
    2) There are tons of tips and nuggets of information for me to take away and use. (I was also surprised at the 800 ISO — I avoid it like the plague because of the noise)
    3) It gives me and others a glimpse of the creative side of the web instead of the business side. All too often the creative people are overlooked in the conversation.

    All around great series which I have recommended to all of my photography friends.

    DnW

  22. I like this series by far and away the best of what you’ve done so far. Here’s why:

    1) It showcases a great photographer who is unlikely to be featured on mainstream TV but deserves to be showcased nevertheless.
    2) There are tons of tips and nuggets of information for me to take away and use. (I was also surprised at the 800 ISO — I avoid it like the plague because of the noise)
    3) It gives me and others a glimpse of the creative side of the web instead of the business side. All too often the creative people are overlooked in the conversation.

    All around great series which I have recommended to all of my photography friends.

    DnW

  23. @9. Which is why I said the equipment just allows you more flexiblity. Give an amature Hawk’s 5D or my NikonD200, and give Hawk your S1 and I can pretty much guarantee you Thomas will come away with better pictures. Even in low light. I’m not familiar with the features of your S1, so I’m not sure how much you can push the exposure. Still and all, it’s a pretty safe bet Thomas could do wonders with your S1, vs an amature with his 5D. It’s not the camera, it’s the photographer.

    Thomas, as for high ISO, depending on the print size, I know my D200 does great at even 1600 ISO when printing the common 4×6 prints. Agreed higher ISO equal more noise, generally showing up in larger prints. Dunno what it is but the Nikon hides the noise pretty well.

  24. @9. Which is why I said the equipment just allows you more flexiblity. Give an amature Hawk’s 5D or my NikonD200, and give Hawk your S1 and I can pretty much guarantee you Thomas will come away with better pictures. Even in low light. I’m not familiar with the features of your S1, so I’m not sure how much you can push the exposure. Still and all, it’s a pretty safe bet Thomas could do wonders with your S1, vs an amature with his 5D. It’s not the camera, it’s the photographer.

    Thomas, as for high ISO, depending on the print size, I know my D200 does great at even 1600 ISO when printing the common 4×6 prints. Agreed higher ISO equal more noise, generally showing up in larger prints. Dunno what it is but the Nikon hides the noise pretty well.

  25. Thomas, as for high ISO, depending on the print size, I know my D200 does great at even 1600 ISO when printing the common 4×6 prints. Agreed higher ISO equal more noise, generally showing up in larger prints. Dunno what it is but the Nikon hides the noise pretty well.

    Noise can always be an issue but the 5D handles noise pretty well most of the time even at higher level ISO’s check out this image

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/78394477/in/set-72057594071061114/

    Now check it out at original size (well reduced from original as flickr limits you to 10MB files — the original is far bigger). There is very little noise at 1600 ISO.

    http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=78394477&size=o&context=set-72057594071061114

    You can even push the ISO more with the 5D by actually setting the camera to 3200 ISO — but there I do actually begin to see a lot of noise.

    LayZ, that D200 is a great SLR too.

  26. Thomas, as for high ISO, depending on the print size, I know my D200 does great at even 1600 ISO when printing the common 4×6 prints. Agreed higher ISO equal more noise, generally showing up in larger prints. Dunno what it is but the Nikon hides the noise pretty well.

    Noise can always be an issue but the 5D handles noise pretty well most of the time even at higher level ISO’s check out this image

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/78394477/in/set-72057594071061114/

    Now check it out at original size (well reduced from original as flickr limits you to 10MB files — the original is far bigger). There is very little noise at 1600 ISO.

    http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=78394477&size=o&context=set-72057594071061114

    You can even push the ISO more with the 5D by actually setting the camera to 3200 ISO — but there I do actually begin to see a lot of noise.

    LayZ, that D200 is a great SLR too.

  27. Thomas, great site BTW. It’s at the top of my bookmarks now. I hope to get at your level skill level soon. Just started taking up the hobby again after being a way for years. (and I’m talking back when we used film and there were still Fotomat’s around. And you had to tell the developer to push your exposures because the film you had wasn’t the right ISO )

  28. Thomas, great site BTW. It’s at the top of my bookmarks now. I hope to get at your level skill level soon. Just started taking up the hobby again after being a way for years. (and I’m talking back when we used film and there were still Fotomat’s around. And you had to tell the developer to push your exposures because the film you had wasn’t the right ISO )

  29. Well, this is the one videocast that finally has some value, Scoble.

    If edited down to a real Walk, insteada the 4 part Boston Marathon…edit out the fluff and excessive tool talk, and ok, maybe…

    But I dunno, when talking stills, digital photography, so bores me, traditional darkroom methods are more the real art, over mass produced digitals. Photowalk with someone lugging around Linhoffs, Arca Swiss and Hasselblads, all high on Ilfochrome.

  30. Well, this is the one videocast that finally has some value, Scoble.

    If edited down to a real Walk, insteada the 4 part Boston Marathon…edit out the fluff and excessive tool talk, and ok, maybe…

    But I dunno, when talking stills, digital photography, so bores me, traditional darkroom methods are more the real art, over mass produced digitals. Photowalk with someone lugging around Linhoffs, Arca Swiss and Hasselblads, all high on Ilfochrome.

  31. @18. Christopher, that’s why I said “some” :-)

    I agree that Scoble still has a long way to go in producing anything of lasting quality. But, if Seagate doesn’t care, I guess that’s all that matters.

    The topic was great, as was the subject. Don’t confuse the mass produced digitals with what quality photographers can do with post processing.

  32. @18. Christopher, that’s why I said “some” :-)

    I agree that Scoble still has a long way to go in producing anything of lasting quality. But, if Seagate doesn’t care, I guess that’s all that matters.

    The topic was great, as was the subject. Don’t confuse the mass produced digitals with what quality photographers can do with post processing.

  33. Excellent series! I’ve enjoyed Thomas’ photography for quite a while! It was great to hear him explain what he looks for in his photographs. It was also very inspiring to hear him talk about always having his camera.

    I’m looking forward to more informal series like this! Classic “sit down” interviews are fine – but I really enjoyed the informality of the photowalk!

  34. Excellent series! I’ve enjoyed Thomas’ photography for quite a while! It was great to hear him explain what he looks for in his photographs. It was also very inspiring to hear him talk about always having his camera.

    I’m looking forward to more informal series like this! Classic “sit down” interviews are fine – but I really enjoyed the informality of the photowalk!

  35. Photowalking

    I like the Photowalking videoblog from the Scobleshow. There’s some useful tips in there.  
    As I watched, I was thinking about what kind of shots he would get if he were constrained by the limitations of a compact camera. Hopefully we would ge…

  36. I’ve posted most of my comments to the blog itself but in general a great start. For me (just getting into photography) it’s a great way to get some tips and as has been said before the informal nature of it was very cool.

    Great start !

  37. I’ve posted most of my comments to the blog itself but in general a great start. For me (just getting into photography) it’s a great way to get some tips and as has been said before the informal nature of it was very cool.

    Great start !