New UMPCs rock

I agree with Engadget. The new UMPCs (basically small Tablet PCs) are MUCH better than the first ones. The new Sony is tiny and interesting. The only thing wrong is still the price.

In fact, at Microsoft they did a lot of price testing. If these ever get to $500 they’ll sell like hotcakes. The OEMs don’t believe Microsoft’s own price testing, though. That’s too bad.

At the Intel Developer Forum I got a demo of one that interacted with a new prototype VW and it was awesome. Those new markets won’t really appear for several more years, but I talked with representatives from VW and they can see a whole bunch of things to do with them.

66 thoughts on “New UMPCs rock

  1. They are quite cool little gadgets to have but I would never pay over the odds for one even if they do go for $500. A Blackberry would suffice for when I’m on the go and when I’m not I have a PC anyway.

  2. They are quite cool little gadgets to have but I would never pay over the odds for one even if they do go for $500. A Blackberry would suffice for when I’m on the go and when I’m not I have a PC anyway.

  3. I work in the software group at Intel and while I can’t speak for Intel, personally I’m not convinced that the proposed plan for a sub $500 Ultra Mobile device is necessarily going to be the tipping point for mass market adoption.

    Intel has been talking about delivering a sub $500 device with a full day’s battery and anywhere internet access. The technical achievement discussed at last weeks Intel Developer Forum really take things up a notch in terms of what can be done with an Ultra Mobile device. I’m working to support software developers advancements in providing the value add that these devices will give the user.
    I see the tipping point being a killer application that allows the users to add value to standard information in a creative way. This will easily trump a multi-use device such as the In-Car Ultra Mobile that replaces existing capabilities of broadcast (radio, satellite), in-car DVD, and MP3 play back.

    I’m thinking that sub $500 is nice but not a requirement for rapid adoption. People balked at the iPod’s price saying that it would not reach mass market appeal until it hit the sum $100 mark. These people were wrong. I believe that a compelling use model will give the product legs at a sub $1000 price point.

  4. I work in the software group at Intel and while I can’t speak for Intel, personally I’m not convinced that the proposed plan for a sub $500 Ultra Mobile device is necessarily going to be the tipping point for mass market adoption.

    Intel has been talking about delivering a sub $500 device with a full day’s battery and anywhere internet access. The technical achievement discussed at last weeks Intel Developer Forum really take things up a notch in terms of what can be done with an Ultra Mobile device. I’m working to support software developers advancements in providing the value add that these devices will give the user.
    I see the tipping point being a killer application that allows the users to add value to standard information in a creative way. This will easily trump a multi-use device such as the In-Car Ultra Mobile that replaces existing capabilities of broadcast (radio, satellite), in-car DVD, and MP3 play back.

    I’m thinking that sub $500 is nice but not a requirement for rapid adoption. People balked at the iPod’s price saying that it would not reach mass market appeal until it hit the sum $100 mark. These people were wrong. I believe that a compelling use model will give the product legs at a sub $1000 price point.

  5. Um, you kinda told us the last ones rocked and now those are officially “lame”.

    And now Microsoft is blaming the OEMs for not being able to get the price down? That _is_ kinda lame.

  6. Um, you kinda told us the last ones rocked and now those are officially “lame”.

    And now Microsoft is blaming the OEMs for not being able to get the price down? That _is_ kinda lame.

  7. Scoble’s more about posting entries now than he is in engaging in any type of “naked conversation”. I don’t see any type of “conversation” going on on this blog lately. Scoble, drive by blog posts don’t really do much to generate a conversation, do they?

    If you’re busy finding more names to drop to maintain your narcissim, that’s understandable. Simply say so and don’t post. But when you do post, it sounds like your readers expect a “naked conversation”.

  8. Scoble’s more about posting entries now than he is in engaging in any type of “naked conversation”. I don’t see any type of “conversation” going on on this blog lately. Scoble, drive by blog posts don’t really do much to generate a conversation, do they?

    If you’re busy finding more names to drop to maintain your narcissim, that’s understandable. Simply say so and don’t post. But when you do post, it sounds like your readers expect a “naked conversation”.

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