Seagate sponsors MySpace contest

Disclaimer, Seagate is the only sponsor so far of the ScobleShow. This post, though, wasn’t included in our deal, though it’s important for me to disclose that.

I do appreciate that Seagate is trying different approaches than just interruptive advertising on the Web. Here’s one, where they are sponsoring a design a new portable device contest, hosted over on MySpace.

I was talking with Seagate’s CEO last week (you’ll see that interview too soon, as part of the sponsorship deal) and I asked him why he sponsored my show. He wants Seagate to be seen as the company used to store your life and gave Thomas Hawk an 8GB Compact Flash card to use on Photowalking, which he did yesterday. Interestingly enough, Thomas Hawk had already bought two 750GB Seagate drives before my sponsorship came through. Says they rock. My show is done on a 500GB drive.

Anyway, this kind of advertising is a lot more interesting than if I stick an ad in your face. At least it lets me continue doing my show and bringing other stuff, like this interview with Atlassian’s CEO (they do an enterprise wiki, among other things) – Atlassian didn’t pay for that interview, but I’m appreciative that Seagate is helping pay my salary, buy machines for me to edit with, and helping pay bandwidth costs.

Speaking of bandwidth costs, wanted to call out to CacheFly. I met several of their team members at the Podcasting Expo a week ago, and they host several big-name sites like Digg, TWiT, and Revision3. How much do they charge? $.14 a gigabyte. Bandwidth gets expensive very quickly when you’re throwing around files that are more than 100megabytes. Leo Laporte says CacheFly rocks. That’s good enough for me.

15 thoughts on “Seagate sponsors MySpace contest

  1. Rajiv: Last I checked Canada wasn’t part of the US :P However that’s not unusual. Legislation around contests can get murky, even with just two countries involved. Go for more and it gets real complicated, fast.

    As to seagate: I’ve trusted my data to Seagate drives (except in laptops, where I’m at the whim of a certain manufacturer) and have only ever had one drive fail (and that was in a brand new machine, so no data loss).

  2. Rajiv: Last I checked Canada wasn’t part of the US :P However that’s not unusual. Legislation around contests can get murky, even with just two countries involved. Go for more and it gets real complicated, fast.

    As to seagate: I’ve trusted my data to Seagate drives (except in laptops, where I’m at the whim of a certain manufacturer) and have only ever had one drive fail (and that was in a brand new machine, so no data loss).

  3. The performance of CacheFly blows something like S3 out of the water. CacheFly is running a major globally redundant TCP anycast network. It’s run by some really really smart folks at the cutting edge of CDN and networking technologies. Matt Levine is the guy to talk to over there.

  4. The performance of CacheFly blows something like S3 out of the water. CacheFly is running a major globally redundant TCP anycast network. It’s run by some really really smart folks at the cutting edge of CDN and networking technologies. Matt Levine is the guy to talk to over there.

  5. John: ahh, I got that quote over dinner at the Podcast Expo. So, might not have been a deal that everyone else gets. But, then, with ISPs if you have huge volumes one thing you learn is you can negotiate better deals. PodTech has been shipping bits in terabytes per day. So, we have a bit more buying power than other small businesses.

  6. John: ahh, I got that quote over dinner at the Podcast Expo. So, might not have been a deal that everyone else gets. But, then, with ISPs if you have huge volumes one thing you learn is you can negotiate better deals. PodTech has been shipping bits in terabytes per day. So, we have a bit more buying power than other small businesses.

  7. Looking at CacheFly right now, I’m wondering where you’re quoting the $0.14/gb price from. From their pricing page…

    http://www.cachefly.com/plans.html

    … it looks like the pricing ranges from $0.25/gb to $0.49/gb. Do you need to do a custom/volume deal to get the lower rate? And if so, aren’t the Amazon S3 rates better? Just curious how they compare. Thanks for the info.

  8. Looking at CacheFly right now, I’m wondering where you’re quoting the $0.14/gb price from. From their pricing page…

    http://www.cachefly.com/plans.html

    … it looks like the pricing ranges from $0.25/gb to $0.49/gb. Do you need to do a custom/volume deal to get the lower rate? And if so, aren’t the Amazon S3 rates better? Just curious how they compare. Thanks for the info.

  9. This has to be the first time that I am suddenly too old to enter a contest for adults. Age 28 is the limit? Dang! They’re making me feel old! And left out!

  10. This has to be the first time that I am suddenly too old to enter a contest for adults. Age 28 is the limit? Dang! They’re making me feel old! And left out!

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