Social Media Club — getting on first base

If you enjoy talking about things like Flickr, Vizrea, YouTube, BlueDot, LinkedIn, WordPress, TypePad, MySpace, or if you’re someone involved in building such you probably would enjoy Chris Heuer’s new Social Media Club. The first meeting is on October 23. Lisa Stone, of BlogHer, and I are giving an interactive workshop for high tech communications professionals.SAP, PR Newswire, Fleishman Hillard are sponsoring.

Of course we could argue about whether this Nokia advertisement on YouTube helps or hurts their brand. Chris Locke, one of the authors of the Cluetrain Manifesto, talked about that ad. So, first goal of advertising (to get you to think about the brand and talk about it with your friends) has been accomplished. That ad was created by Brand Tacticians. What’s the second goal? Get you to start a conversation. Back in the 1990s when I did advertising for a small camera/AV store in San Jose, my advertising was always aimed at getting you to come into my store. I knew that if I could get you to come into my store there was a pretty good chance of getting to third goal, which is to buy something. Home run? When you came back a second time. That’s when I knew I had converted you into a longterm customer.

Anyway, come join us, will be fun. A few spaces are still available. Costs $150 (I am doing this for free).

25 thoughts on “Social Media Club — getting on first base

  1. Sounds novel! I think we’ll have to steal borrow syndicate this idea for the lovely citizens of Canuckistan (starting off with Vancouver) ;)

  2. Sounds novel! I think we’ll have to steal borrow syndicate this idea for the lovely citizens of Canuckistan (starting off with Vancouver) ;)

  3. Rats. I’m going to be in HMB from Thursday to Sunday next week, but I won’t be up there on the 23rd. I want to be part of Social Media Club. I will watch the podcast.

    Saw the Flock demo on the show and switched to it (again). Last time I tried it was pre-launch, and it was very unstable.

  4. Rats. I’m going to be in HMB from Thursday to Sunday next week, but I won’t be up there on the 23rd. I want to be part of Social Media Club. I will watch the podcast.

    Saw the Flock demo on the show and switched to it (again). Last time I tried it was pre-launch, and it was very unstable.

  5. Thank you Robert for participating in this important event. Working with Chris and Giovanni on this event has taught me that there’s much work to be done to help get folks up to speed. You’re involvement helps us escalate our efforts. Cheers!

  6. Thank you Robert for participating in this important event. Working with Chris and Giovanni on this event has taught me that there’s much work to be done to help get folks up to speed. You’re involvement helps us escalate our efforts. Cheers!

  7. Thanks for the plug for the Nokia ad, Robert. The Youtube one was really just a demo – you can make your own here

    As for your point about whether these kinds of things can harm a brand, it’s interesting to note that after Jamie Oliver, a famous UK chef, ripped apart a brand called Turkey Twizzlers for making our kids obese, sales actually went up.

    Having said that, there’s been some dreadful spamming of newsgroups about this viral ad, I’m not sure by whom, which won’t have done Nokia any favours.

    b

  8. Thanks for the plug for the Nokia ad, Robert. The Youtube one was really just a demo – you can make your own here

    As for your point about whether these kinds of things can harm a brand, it’s interesting to note that after Jamie Oliver, a famous UK chef, ripped apart a brand called Turkey Twizzlers for making our kids obese, sales actually went up.

    Having said that, there’s been some dreadful spamming of newsgroups about this viral ad, I’m not sure by whom, which won’t have done Nokia any favours.

    b

  9. Robert – sadly, I won’t be able to join you at the Social Media Club thing. I was so excited to be linked from your blog that I went out and bought half a dozen Nokia cell phones, and I don’t have $150 leftover. Next time, I will try harder to curb my enthusiasm. ;-)

  10. Robert – sadly, I won’t be able to join you at the Social Media Club thing. I was so excited to be linked from your blog that I went out and bought half a dozen Nokia cell phones, and I don’t have $150 leftover. Next time, I will try harder to curb my enthusiasm. ;-)

  11. Robert, thanks again for putting this out there.

    MP: We are extremely fortunate to have Robert,
    Lisa Stone and Giovanni Rodriguez as our inaugural speakers here at the Silicon Valley event. We do intend to podcast the workshop so if you cannot make it in person, you will still be able to experience it.

    Our goal is to host these workshops every other month, highlighting a new group of folks who ‘get it’ at each one. If anyone has any suggestions for towns, venues and/or speakers, please shoot an email to kristie@brainjams.org.

    As an aside, we are coming to Seattle on 11/14/06 and will be launching a local chapter of the Social Media Club. Keep watch on http://www.socialmediaclub.org as more details to come.

    Thanks (and please forgive for taking over the comments and all the shameless plugging)!

  12. Robert, thanks again for putting this out there.

    MP: We are extremely fortunate to have Robert,
    Lisa Stone and Giovanni Rodriguez as our inaugural speakers here at the Silicon Valley event. We do intend to podcast the workshop so if you cannot make it in person, you will still be able to experience it.

    Our goal is to host these workshops every other month, highlighting a new group of folks who ‘get it’ at each one. If anyone has any suggestions for towns, venues and/or speakers, please shoot an email to kristie@brainjams.org.

    As an aside, we are coming to Seattle on 11/14/06 and will be launching a local chapter of the Social Media Club. Keep watch on http://www.socialmediaclub.org as more details to come.

    Thanks (and please forgive for taking over the comments and all the shameless plugging)!

  13. Great points Robert – I love your ability to convey what can be a compelx topic so eloquently and with great personal stories.

    This is exactly what I have been talking to people about since 1999. I call it The Communications Strategy – and if you prod me to explain it at too late of an hour over drinks, I just may go on about it for an hour – you can see a Flickr of the relevant parts of the model Robert talks about with his camera shop here http://tinyurl.com/yhjkjk.

    Companies should not be overemphasizing getting to that initial sale, they should be focused on building the relationship, ensuring the value offered matches the customers needs and helping them become more loyal customers. This is best accomplished by teaching them to understand how they may fully benefit from your products or services. Not from over promising or refusing to fully disclose what the shortcomings are.

    Companies need to do more to provide the knowledge a customer or potential customer needs to properly make use of what they offer. Given what is available on the market today, it shocks me how poor many companies are doing in this area and how smaller competitors are beating them down with great screencasts and flash demos. With today’s Social Media tools, it is easier and more cost effective than ever before possible to interactively engage people to provide the information they need to know. when they need to know it.

    We have known for a long time that no one really ever does RTFM – but people do watch short videos and listen to podcasts about stuff that matters to them. So if you talk about the important bits, and you talk with people instead of at them – you can become authentically engaged. We have been mechanizing our communications systems for too long – the path to real success lies within humanizing the systems. Throw a little more transparency into the mix and you have a chance to become a ‘Lovemark’ ala Kevin Robert’s book of the same name and a strong chance to be the best in your market.

    By using Social Media tools to engage in the conversation, you can produce Corporate Media that benefits everyone who cares about the problems you solve or value you provide. However, if you are not genuine and transparent (see the Jeff Jaffee post on Wal-Mart’s Social Media flops – http://tinyurl.com/y8g5v3 ) you will just learn the hard way – which is a shame because it could be avoided. You cannot win if you think this is about managing micro-segments in the long tail. The only way to win is to belong to the community – to care, to listen, to respond, to contribute and to participate.

    Thanks Robert for agreeing to help us out with our first workshop – and more importantly for always being out there, contributing to the community and helping more people ‘get it’.

    PS – I’d be remiss if I did not say thanks again to the original Cluetrain authors who laid the foundation for what is possible today – if you have not read it yet, you should do your best to read it now or perhaps re-read it.

    PPS – One correction and a quick promo. We have had Social Media Club meetings in Silicon Valley, San Francisco, London, New York, Miami and Los Angeles over the past couple of months. We are hosting round table conversations in Boston, New York and DC at the end of this month and up to Seattle (thanks Mitch Ratcliffe) and Vancouver in November along with a special event in San Francisco. Other folks are talking about starting up their own chapters in other cities on their own, which is really the point. We are also putting on that little unconference thing to celebrate the Web’s latest release, Web 2point2 on November 9-10.

  14. Great points Robert – I love your ability to convey what can be a compelx topic so eloquently and with great personal stories.

    This is exactly what I have been talking to people about since 1999. I call it The Communications Strategy – and if you prod me to explain it at too late of an hour over drinks, I just may go on about it for an hour – you can see a Flickr of the relevant parts of the model Robert talks about with his camera shop here http://tinyurl.com/yhjkjk.

    Companies should not be overemphasizing getting to that initial sale, they should be focused on building the relationship, ensuring the value offered matches the customers needs and helping them become more loyal customers. This is best accomplished by teaching them to understand how they may fully benefit from your products or services. Not from over promising or refusing to fully disclose what the shortcomings are.

    Companies need to do more to provide the knowledge a customer or potential customer needs to properly make use of what they offer. Given what is available on the market today, it shocks me how poor many companies are doing in this area and how smaller competitors are beating them down with great screencasts and flash demos. With today’s Social Media tools, it is easier and more cost effective than ever before possible to interactively engage people to provide the information they need to know. when they need to know it.

    We have known for a long time that no one really ever does RTFM – but people do watch short videos and listen to podcasts about stuff that matters to them. So if you talk about the important bits, and you talk with people instead of at them – you can become authentically engaged. We have been mechanizing our communications systems for too long – the path to real success lies within humanizing the systems. Throw a little more transparency into the mix and you have a chance to become a ‘Lovemark’ ala Kevin Robert’s book of the same name and a strong chance to be the best in your market.

    By using Social Media tools to engage in the conversation, you can produce Corporate Media that benefits everyone who cares about the problems you solve or value you provide. However, if you are not genuine and transparent (see the Jeff Jaffee post on Wal-Mart’s Social Media flops – http://tinyurl.com/y8g5v3 ) you will just learn the hard way – which is a shame because it could be avoided. You cannot win if you think this is about managing micro-segments in the long tail. The only way to win is to belong to the community – to care, to listen, to respond, to contribute and to participate.

    Thanks Robert for agreeing to help us out with our first workshop – and more importantly for always being out there, contributing to the community and helping more people ‘get it’.

    PS – I’d be remiss if I did not say thanks again to the original Cluetrain authors who laid the foundation for what is possible today – if you have not read it yet, you should do your best to read it now or perhaps re-read it.

    PPS – One correction and a quick promo. We have had Social Media Club meetings in Silicon Valley, San Francisco, London, New York, Miami and Los Angeles over the past couple of months. We are hosting round table conversations in Boston, New York and DC at the end of this month and up to Seattle (thanks Mitch Ratcliffe) and Vancouver in November along with a special event in San Francisco. Other folks are talking about starting up their own chapters in other cities on their own, which is really the point. We are also putting on that little unconference thing to celebrate the Web’s latest release, Web 2point2 on November 9-10.

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