Comments

  1. Huh, I should use Zoomr instead of Shutterfly. It seems a lot nicer. I really need something good anyway for my Paperclip 2 House project.

    Andrew
    Paperclip 2 House

  2. Huh, I should use Zoomr instead of Shutterfly. It seems a lot nicer. I really need something good anyway for my Paperclip 2 House project.

    Andrew
    Paperclip 2 House

  3. Hey Robert, thanks for blogging this. We are excited about our new features and have many more to come shortly. We are trying to keep up the one a week pace and think we should have the whole thing built out 90% of the way in the next 6 to 12 months or so.

    Watching Kristopher code is great fun, he started coding software when he was 4 years old. He won an iPod down there at Hack Day for getting first prize in the hacking Yahoo! Messenger category.

    Right now it’s just the two of us at the company. We have some seed VC money and will probably raise a bit more here shortly but the good news is that our burn rate is actually very slow. It’s amazing to me that an 18 year old can stay up coding all night and then survive on pizza and cheeseburgers for energy.

    The application is written mostly in Python which allows it to be very modular and allows us to more easily add new features.

    When Kristopher and I first met he asked me if I could have any feature on a photo sharing site what would I want. As a blogger I said trackbacks as I’d spent several months bitching about how I wanted that feature when blogging my photos on other photo sharing sites. While we were chatting on Skype and in less than an hour he built that feature for me. To me that was pretty impressive.

    We have a long way to go and it’s probably only an 18 year old and a die hard photographer that would be crazy enough to try and start a photo sharing business today, when there are already 100 other companies in this crowded space, but we are passionate and hell bent on building Zooomr out and growing a vibrant community of photographers.

    One area where we think we have a good start is in the international market. At present Zooomr is localized in 17 different langauges, our most recent added is Italian. (Kristopher browses the site in Japanese — he taught himself Japanese from the internet). By localizing the site for an international audience we think people get a more universal photo sharing experience. Right now we are getting more traffic from China than anywhere else in the world for instance. It’s great to see local people in China, and not just tourists, sharing photos with people from San Francisco.

    Anyways, thanks for blogging our new features and we’re looking forward to developing the best photo sharing playground in the world. We’re still in beta now and there are definitely some rough spots but we are improving every day. And thanks to everyone who has been signing up for the service and sharing their photos. There are some pretty fantastic shots showing up on Zooomr. Here’s a link to the shots I’ve favorited so far. It’s only 2 days old and I’ve already got 10 pages of them up!

    http://beta.zooomr.com/photos/thomashawk/faves

  4. Hey Robert, thanks for blogging this. We are excited about our new features and have many more to come shortly. We are trying to keep up the one a week pace and think we should have the whole thing built out 90% of the way in the next 6 to 12 months or so.

    Watching Kristopher code is great fun, he started coding software when he was 4 years old. He won an iPod down there at Hack Day for getting first prize in the hacking Yahoo! Messenger category.

    Right now it’s just the two of us at the company. We have some seed VC money and will probably raise a bit more here shortly but the good news is that our burn rate is actually very slow. It’s amazing to me that an 18 year old can stay up coding all night and then survive on pizza and cheeseburgers for energy.

    The application is written mostly in Python which allows it to be very modular and allows us to more easily add new features.

    When Kristopher and I first met he asked me if I could have any feature on a photo sharing site what would I want. As a blogger I said trackbacks as I’d spent several months bitching about how I wanted that feature when blogging my photos on other photo sharing sites. While we were chatting on Skype and in less than an hour he built that feature for me. To me that was pretty impressive.

    We have a long way to go and it’s probably only an 18 year old and a die hard photographer that would be crazy enough to try and start a photo sharing business today, when there are already 100 other companies in this crowded space, but we are passionate and hell bent on building Zooomr out and growing a vibrant community of photographers.

    One area where we think we have a good start is in the international market. At present Zooomr is localized in 17 different langauges, our most recent added is Italian. (Kristopher browses the site in Japanese — he taught himself Japanese from the internet). By localizing the site for an international audience we think people get a more universal photo sharing experience. Right now we are getting more traffic from China than anywhere else in the world for instance. It’s great to see local people in China, and not just tourists, sharing photos with people from San Francisco.

    Anyways, thanks for blogging our new features and we’re looking forward to developing the best photo sharing playground in the world. We’re still in beta now and there are definitely some rough spots but we are improving every day. And thanks to everyone who has been signing up for the service and sharing their photos. There are some pretty fantastic shots showing up on Zooomr. Here’s a link to the shots I’ve favorited so far. It’s only 2 days old and I’ve already got 10 pages of them up!

    http://beta.zooomr.com/photos/thomashawk/faves

  5. If I had a really (really, REALLY) easy way to move everything from Flickr to Zooomr, I’d probably do it.

    As it is, it does work very well anyway, I only have one minor issue with spanish caracters (the ‘ñ’, o ‘n with tilde’), which drove Zoomr crazy last time I used it.

    However, the pro account thing works great, and every blogger should at least try it…

    (Thomas, you can send stock options my way anytime now… ;) )

  6. If I had a really (really, REALLY) easy way to move everything from Flickr to Zooomr, I’d probably do it.

    As it is, it does work very well anyway, I only have one minor issue with spanish caracters (the ‘ñ’, o ‘n with tilde’), which drove Zoomr crazy last time I used it.

    However, the pro account thing works great, and every blogger should at least try it…

    (Thomas, you can send stock options my way anytime now… ;) )

  7. Hi -

    I’d love to have a place to archive my DNG photos and not be restricted to just JPGs. I haven’t found a photo site that allows this yet. My hard drive is filling up with DNG files (I use Adobe Lightroom to convert my RAW files into DNG on import) and I want to hold on to them. I’d just prefer to do so by uploading them to a web site instead of burning DVDs. It’d be even better if I could upload both DNG and high-res JPG and have them linked to each other in the viewer. This way I could have an option to “download high-res DNG” when browsing my JPG photos.

    Thanks,
    Mike Downey
    Adobe Systems

  8. Hi -

    I’d love to have a place to archive my DNG photos and not be restricted to just JPGs. I haven’t found a photo site that allows this yet. My hard drive is filling up with DNG files (I use Adobe Lightroom to convert my RAW files into DNG on import) and I want to hold on to them. I’d just prefer to do so by uploading them to a web site instead of burning DVDs. It’d be even better if I could upload both DNG and high-res JPG and have them linked to each other in the viewer. This way I could have an option to “download high-res DNG” when browsing my JPG photos.

    Thanks,
    Mike Downey
    Adobe Systems