Zillow has the nicest real estate in Web 2.0 industry

Really great visit with Zillow today. They are less than a year old. Their business plan called for having a million visitors by today. So far they have more than three.

Look for an announcement from them to show up on TechCrunch soon. Soon being within days. I don’t break news anymore, I just do videos.

Anyway, they have the nicest offices in the Web 2.0 world that I’ve seen so far. They are in the Wells Fargo building in downtown Seattle on the 46′th floor and have stunning views that wrap around all sides of the building.

They arranged each of their areas into “cul de sacs” around a window display.

Not many corporate offices can beat their arrangements and views.

Anyway, onto Google now.

Comments

  1. Clothed conversations with Robert Scoble

    L-R: Drew Meyers, DG Christensen, Robert Scoble, Fred Sadaghiani, Bill Nordwall, Randy Puttick Buzz Bruggeman This morning myself and a few other developers had the privilege to sit down and geek out with Robert Scoble, who paid a visit to

  2. I don’t break news anymore, I just do videos.

    Better anyways…video lasts; more of value, breaking news is forever fleeting.

  3. I don’t break news anymore, I just do videos.

    Better anyways…video lasts; more of value, breaking news is forever fleeting.

  4. I’m interested in seeing the video from Zillow and how well you researched the issues surrounding them.

    There is quite a bit of lively discussion in the real estate industry right now with zillow supporters and opponents both holding strong views. Examples of some of the issues raised by some of the more respected real estate blogs can be found here:

    http://www.bloodhoundrealty.com/BloodhoundBlog/?p=134

    http://blog.sellsiusrealestate.com/2006/10/11/dizcrimination-by-zestimation-or-the-law-of-unintended-consequences/

    I’m interested in seeing how much discussion of these types of issues regarding Zillow came out in your video or if this is just a softball PR piece.

    I’m not on either side as I have not made up my mind – therefore I’m hoping to see the responses to some well thought out questions regarding these issues with Zillow in video from the source. To me, that would be the value-add of your video interviews…and worth paying for.

  5. I’m interested in seeing the video from Zillow and how well you researched the issues surrounding them.

    There is quite a bit of lively discussion in the real estate industry right now with zillow supporters and opponents both holding strong views. Examples of some of the issues raised by some of the more respected real estate blogs can be found here:

    http://www.bloodhoundrealty.com/BloodhoundBlog/?p=134

    http://blog.sellsiusrealestate.com/2006/10/11/dizcrimination-by-zestimation-or-the-law-of-unintended-consequences/

    I’m interested in seeing how much discussion of these types of issues regarding Zillow came out in your video or if this is just a softball PR piece.

    I’m not on either side as I have not made up my mind – therefore I’m hoping to see the responses to some well thought out questions regarding these issues with Zillow in video from the source. To me, that would be the value-add of your video interviews…and worth paying for.

  6. J-Man: the interviews today cover a lot of waterfront. I just sold and bought homes, so I was well aware of the issues.

    Buzz Bruggeman brought up the issue you discuss here. Obviously if you’re in a state that makes a lot of income off of property taxes (Buzz used to live in Florida, where they don’t have income taxes, so get very aggressive at raising property taxes through higher valuations) then you won’t want to increase your home’s value through Zillow ratings.

    I think that blog misses the point. The only time you care about your home’s value is when you’re about to sell. Then all of a sudden you want a HUGE valuation (my home in Bothell sold for MORE than Zillow’s estimates, which made me very happy).

    Even better, the home we bought in Half Moon Bay went for far less than Zillow’s estimates, which made us even happier.

  7. J-Man: the interviews today cover a lot of waterfront. I just sold and bought homes, so I was well aware of the issues.

    Buzz Bruggeman brought up the issue you discuss here. Obviously if you’re in a state that makes a lot of income off of property taxes (Buzz used to live in Florida, where they don’t have income taxes, so get very aggressive at raising property taxes through higher valuations) then you won’t want to increase your home’s value through Zillow ratings.

    I think that blog misses the point. The only time you care about your home’s value is when you’re about to sell. Then all of a sudden you want a HUGE valuation (my home in Bothell sold for MORE than Zillow’s estimates, which made me very happy).

    Even better, the home we bought in Half Moon Bay went for far less than Zillow’s estimates, which made us even happier.

  8. > (my home in Bothell sold for MORE than Zillow’s estimates, which made me very happy).

    > Even better, the home we bought in Half Moon Bay went for far less than Zillow’s estimates, which made us even happier.

    So you’re pleased that Zillow.com is useless for evaluating homes?

  9. > (my home in Bothell sold for MORE than Zillow’s estimates, which made me very happy).

    > Even better, the home we bought in Half Moon Bay went for far less than Zillow’s estimates, which made us even happier.

    So you’re pleased that Zillow.com is useless for evaluating homes?

  10. Nice one Greg. But a shiny office does count for something, especially if it has an unzillowable view.

    Mr. Scoble, if you read only that one post on zillow (tax consequences), which was based on a Seatle PI article, then you have missed the main points.
    BTW, your post here is only looking from the seller side–you forgot the buyer.

    Read these posts if you want to get past the nice view and office arrangement. Maybe not,the view (perception) may be all that matters.

    Mining the Elusive Unzillowable where David G & I have a frank debate: http://tinyurl.com/uybg6

    Unzestimate my Home: Will Zillow Allow Owners to Opt-out: http://tinyurl.com/y5n6n6

    Zillow Confesses…: http://tinyurl.com/y3myt8

  11. Nice one Greg. But a shiny office does count for something, especially if it has an unzillowable view.

    Mr. Scoble, if you read only that one post on zillow (tax consequences), which was based on a Seatle PI article, then you have missed the main points.
    BTW, your post here is only looking from the seller side–you forgot the buyer.

    Read these posts if you want to get past the nice view and office arrangement. Maybe not,the view (perception) may be all that matters.

    Mining the Elusive Unzillowable where David G & I have a frank debate: http://tinyurl.com/uybg6

    Unzestimate my Home: Will Zillow Allow Owners to Opt-out: http://tinyurl.com/y5n6n6

    Zillow Confesses…: http://tinyurl.com/y3myt8

  12. > Greg: it’s not useless. It’s one datapoint. It should be the BEGINNING of your homework as to the value of real estate, not the end.

    I was tweaking your nose. I thought your remarks were funny. A Zillow.com Zestimate is every bit as useful as an on-line physical examination — it will tell you just enough to let you know that you don’t actually know anything yet. If they would admit that plainly, I would have no problem with them.

  13. > Greg: it’s not useless. It’s one datapoint. It should be the BEGINNING of your homework as to the value of real estate, not the end.

    I was tweaking your nose. I thought your remarks were funny. A Zillow.com Zestimate is every bit as useful as an on-line physical examination — it will tell you just enough to let you know that you don’t actually know anything yet. If they would admit that plainly, I would have no problem with them.

  14. [...] Dustin Luther at Rain City Guide has four posts (so far) on the Seattle Blog Business Summit. My skeptometer may need re-calibration, but I’m wondering if there is a difference between being well-known and being well-thought-out. Austin Bay got to interview Donald Rumsfeld this week, you tell me why. Robert Scoble, who praises Zillow.com because it’s always wrong in his experience, advises webloggers to “write well.” Ya think? [...]