Apple blogger calls "bullshit" on me

Chuqui, who is was an Apple employee, has a point. Apple employees ARE allowed to blog. They just aren’t allowed to be spokespeople, as Chuqui admits. So, they don’t feel empowered to talk about anything that they are working on, as Chuqui admits. That’s completely different from what Microsoft, Sun Microsystems, Adobe, IBM, and other tech companies tell their employees.

Lots of Apple employees have told me that they want to blog about work. He says the goal should be communication, not getting credit.

Absolutely!

But what he doesn’t admit is that Google has changed everything. Now I totally expect to be able to find an employee at a company running a product group. Here’s a test.

Go to Google. Type “OneNote blog.” You’ll find Chris Pratley. He runs the team. I can tell him his product sucks in his comments.

Now, go back to Google. Type “Apple MacBook blog.” Do you find an Apple employee? No. You find a corporate page. Send an email there. Does it go to the right person? I have no idea. Certainly bloggers who’ve tried that recently due to Apple’s rebooting problems are getting unstatisfactory answers.

Anyway, you can see the difference in how Apple treats online communication in Chuqui’s post. At Adobe I see tons of blogs. At Microsoft I see tons of blogs. At IBM I see tons of blogs. At Sun I see tons of blogs.

The difference is telling.

And the fact that Chuqui thinks it’s about credit is telling too.

Oh, well, it ain’t my company.

UPDATE: Chuqui doesn’t work at Apple anymore. He did for years. I am sorry for missing that he doesn’t work there any longer.

267 thoughts on “Apple blogger calls "bullshit" on me

  1. John Welch said it better than I could. Scoble, I don’t know of any CEO or CIO that is going to engage in something based on faith. That’s great you believe in The Church of Blogging. I hope you continue to pay your tithing, take your communion and are ultimately saved. But this is the epitiome of being all hat and no cattle. You have super secret double probation data you can’t share so we have to take you on faith? Sorry, that won’t sell in any boardroom. Like John said, you are sounding like a televangilist. But again, I prefer Blogo-Facist given the way you want to engage in the debate.

    I guess you took your former MS title WAY too literally.

  2. John Welch said it better than I could. Scoble, I don’t know of any CEO or CIO that is going to engage in something based on faith. That’s great you believe in The Church of Blogging. I hope you continue to pay your tithing, take your communion and are ultimately saved. But this is the epitiome of being all hat and no cattle. You have super secret double probation data you can’t share so we have to take you on faith? Sorry, that won’t sell in any boardroom. Like John said, you are sounding like a televangilist. But again, I prefer Blogo-Facist given the way you want to engage in the debate.

    I guess you took your former MS title WAY too literally.

  3. **“I’m just going off of what their own CEO says.”

    Jobs has said to you that Apple has a problem not having blogs (when they do have blogs)? **

    Oh, I get it, John’s post cleared that up for me. So wait: your most concrete evidence of a blog’s effect on the bottomline (which actually seems quite clearly extremely spurious on the face of it) is based on the CEO’s say so?

    Brilliant! And this is what we get from blogs. 96% of all search results on Stormhoek are bloggers blogging how blogging lovely blogs are, repeating this nonsense: “through a blog and blog strategy alone we have doubled sales.” Jesus, if only one blogger gave a sh!t about reality and didn’t want to hype blogs, this claim could have been discredited in a second. But I guess when your getting free cases of wine (how many thousands of those cases were given to every blog event over the last year or more?) and it validates what you want to hear that constitutes concrete proof, huh?

  4. **“I’m just going off of what their own CEO says.”

    Jobs has said to you that Apple has a problem not having blogs (when they do have blogs)? **

    Oh, I get it, John’s post cleared that up for me. So wait: your most concrete evidence of a blog’s effect on the bottomline (which actually seems quite clearly extremely spurious on the face of it) is based on the CEO’s say so?

    Brilliant! And this is what we get from blogs. 96% of all search results on Stormhoek are bloggers blogging how blogging lovely blogs are, repeating this nonsense: “through a blog and blog strategy alone we have doubled sales.” Jesus, if only one blogger gave a sh!t about reality and didn’t want to hype blogs, this claim could have been discredited in a second. But I guess when your getting free cases of wine (how many thousands of those cases were given to every blog event over the last year or more?) and it validates what you want to hear that constitutes concrete proof, huh?

  5. I don’t have it. I’m just going off of what their own CEO says. But, maybe it’s just good wine and people are discovering it all on its own.

    Or maybe, it’s just part of what Geobbels pointed out is a rather mature, large scale growing of the company, and the CEO is astute enough to let blogging take the public credit for it, because he knows that no one will question his claims in a serious manner outside of maybe the analyst community, who already know better. Robert, come on, you have supposedly had journalist training, and you saw the crap that Gates et al pulled in court. You mean it never occured to you that a CEO might engage in misdirection as PR?

    Or was he saying something that you wanted to hear so badly that you just took him at his word, because it gave some proof, however thin, to your own party line.

    There’s a lot of variables that go into stock price. I can’t nail any one variable on the stock price. Google has been encouraging its employees to blog more often lately and its stock price has gone up.

    Right. So maybe blogging is not the end all and be all of things, no matter how much you believe it is, and dude, by the way you talk about it, it’s faith man. All you’re missing is an ugly suit and bad hair.

    In the meantime, stuff like this might have more of an effect on stock price than whether or not Apple blogs: http://www.fool.com/news/commentary/2006/commentary06103004.htm

    I stopped taking Motley Fool seriously on anything quite a few years ago, when I realized that they were far more interested in pushing the Church of the Motley Fool than in actually helping people invest better.

  6. I don’t have it. I’m just going off of what their own CEO says. But, maybe it’s just good wine and people are discovering it all on its own.

    Or maybe, it’s just part of what Geobbels pointed out is a rather mature, large scale growing of the company, and the CEO is astute enough to let blogging take the public credit for it, because he knows that no one will question his claims in a serious manner outside of maybe the analyst community, who already know better. Robert, come on, you have supposedly had journalist training, and you saw the crap that Gates et al pulled in court. You mean it never occured to you that a CEO might engage in misdirection as PR?

    Or was he saying something that you wanted to hear so badly that you just took him at his word, because it gave some proof, however thin, to your own party line.

    There’s a lot of variables that go into stock price. I can’t nail any one variable on the stock price. Google has been encouraging its employees to blog more often lately and its stock price has gone up.

    Right. So maybe blogging is not the end all and be all of things, no matter how much you believe it is, and dude, by the way you talk about it, it’s faith man. All you’re missing is an ugly suit and bad hair.

    In the meantime, stuff like this might have more of an effect on stock price than whether or not Apple blogs: http://www.fool.com/news/commentary/2006/commentary06103004.htm

    I stopped taking Motley Fool seriously on anything quite a few years ago, when I realized that they were far more interested in pushing the Church of the Motley Fool than in actually helping people invest better.

  7. “Sour grapes, you say? Maybe it is.”

    Why should I care if this guy has an effect? And if he is, what is that effect? Increase in stock value from mid 60s to breaking the technical barrier of 80?

    He claims Apple has done too little too late, that the apology is not enough. Of 200 companies with backdating issues (and maybe blogging issues too… ha, ha, ha) I cannot name another single company who has apologized or who is further along in getting the matter behind them. Maybe this is just some silly reporting jumping on the bandwagon that gets hits and attention… Maybe? Hmmm, that sounds familiar.

    “I’m just going off of what their own CEO says.”

    Jobs has said to you that Apple has a problem not having blogs (when they do have blogs)?

  8. “Sour grapes, you say? Maybe it is.”

    Why should I care if this guy has an effect? And if he is, what is that effect? Increase in stock value from mid 60s to breaking the technical barrier of 80?

    He claims Apple has done too little too late, that the apology is not enough. Of 200 companies with backdating issues (and maybe blogging issues too… ha, ha, ha) I cannot name another single company who has apologized or who is further along in getting the matter behind them. Maybe this is just some silly reporting jumping on the bandwagon that gets hits and attention… Maybe? Hmmm, that sounds familiar.

    “I’m just going off of what their own CEO says.”

    Jobs has said to you that Apple has a problem not having blogs (when they do have blogs)?

  9. John,

    >>Robert, you love that example, yet where’s the actual, testable, non-spun data that conclusively shows that blogging, and blogging ALONE doubled their sales? If blogging had that kind of effect on people, shouldn’t both Microsoft’s and Sun’s stock performance be looking more like Apple’s?

    I don’t have it. I’m just going off of what their own CEO says. But, maybe it’s just good wine and people are discovering it all on its own.

    There’s a lot of variables that go into stock price. I can’t nail any one variable on the stock price. Google has been encouraging its employees to blog more often lately and its stock price has gone up.

    In the meantime, stuff like this might have more of an effect on stock price than whether or not Apple blogs: http://www.fool.com/news/commentary/2006/commentary06103004.htm

  10. John,

    >>Robert, you love that example, yet where’s the actual, testable, non-spun data that conclusively shows that blogging, and blogging ALONE doubled their sales? If blogging had that kind of effect on people, shouldn’t both Microsoft’s and Sun’s stock performance be looking more like Apple’s?

    I don’t have it. I’m just going off of what their own CEO says. But, maybe it’s just good wine and people are discovering it all on its own.

    There’s a lot of variables that go into stock price. I can’t nail any one variable on the stock price. Google has been encouraging its employees to blog more often lately and its stock price has gone up.

    In the meantime, stuff like this might have more of an effect on stock price than whether or not Apple blogs: http://www.fool.com/news/commentary/2006/commentary06103004.htm

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