Who has the best minimalist blog?

What’s a minimalist blog? One that doesn’t say much, but has a high signal-to-noise factor. Nick Baum demonstrates. (He’s the product manager of the Google Reader team, too — the video interview and demo of him should be up on ScobleShow tonight if all goes well).

Who else has a “must read” minimalist blog?

49 thoughts on “Who has the best minimalist blog?

  1. Here’s mine: http://bh2go.blogspot

    I’m quite impressed (not by my own blog, of course) but by what can be done with a google blogspot.

    It’s my first real attempt and very fresh (as in only just created) so there isn’t an awful lot on there right now.

  2. Here’s mine: http://bh2go.blogspot

    I’m quite impressed (not by my own blog, of course) but by what can be done with a google blogspot.

    It’s my first real attempt and very fresh (as in only just created) so there isn’t an awful lot on there right now.

  3. Mine is the most poorly maintained blog in the cloud, I think… If you look at the dates, I didn’t write something for SIX MONTHS until last week, when I finally was able to set some time apart for it. If the number of posts counts as a minimalistic quality, I would probably take that prize home! But seriously, as far as the design goes, I’ve been trying to make it as minimalist as possible, while maintaining usability and accessibility. It’s curious how trying to get to the simplest expression of your design is usually a way harder job. I’d like to read your opinions about it ( http://www.minusfive.com ).

    Thanks.

  4. Mine is the most poorly maintained blog in the cloud, I think… If you look at the dates, I didn’t write something for SIX MONTHS until last week, when I finally was able to set some time apart for it. If the number of posts counts as a minimalistic quality, I would probably take that prize home! But seriously, as far as the design goes, I’ve been trying to make it as minimalist as possible, while maintaining usability and accessibility. It’s curious how trying to get to the simplest expression of your design is usually a way harder job. I’d like to read your opinions about it ( http://www.minusfive.com ).

    Thanks.

  5. Indeed, Nick Baum’s blog is far from what I would call minimalist. I’m quite a fan of Scott Wallick’s WP themes: http://www.plaintxt.org

    My site implements one of his themes, and tries to stay true to the concept of minimalism, whilst, by necessity, containing lots of information. Lots of words does not mean it is not minimalist. It is how those words are packaged that is determinate.

  6. Indeed, Nick Baum’s blog is far from what I would call minimalist. I’m quite a fan of Scott Wallick’s WP themes: http://www.plaintxt.org

    My site implements one of his themes, and tries to stay true to the concept of minimalism, whilst, by necessity, containing lots of information. Lots of words does not mean it is not minimalist. It is how those words are packaged that is determinate.

  7. Maybe it’s just me, but my first impression of Nick Baum’s blog is that it’s far from minimalist. Lots of tags crammed in around images in one half of the page says crowded to me rather than minimalist. From your introduction, I was expecting to see a series of pithy two line entries and lots of space. Just goes to show that people have different interpretations of minimalism.

  8. Maybe it’s just me, but my first impression of Nick Baum’s blog is that it’s far from minimalist. Lots of tags crammed in around images in one half of the page says crowded to me rather than minimalist. From your introduction, I was expecting to see a series of pithy two line entries and lots of space. Just goes to show that people have different interpretations of minimalism.

  9. mine of course… just white and grays..

    and no, i did not based on a “apple” look it was actually based on the way live.com white with gray version looked like.

  10. mine of course… just white and grays..

    and no, i did not based on a “apple” look it was actually based on the way live.com white with gray version looked like.

  11. I’m going to have to recommend Qarl (Qarl Fizz in Second Life):

    http://www.qarl.com/qLab/

    Looks like a modified Hemingway theme, just about every post a veritable gem.

    Perhaps it might be a contradiction to some that by saying a little, you’re infact saying a LOT, but that comes through being able to focus on the good stuff.

    Nick does have a tag cloud, and those tend to look noisy — but at least his is unobstrusive, at the bottom!

  12. I’m going to have to recommend Qarl (Qarl Fizz in Second Life):

    http://www.qarl.com/qLab/

    Looks like a modified Hemingway theme, just about every post a veritable gem.

    Perhaps it might be a contradiction to some that by saying a little, you’re infact saying a LOT, but that comes through being able to focus on the good stuff.

    Nick does have a tag cloud, and those tend to look noisy — but at least his is unobstrusive, at the bottom!

  13. Mine is very minimalist, I hate all the wordpress themes because they give extensive space at the top of the blog to a header. I wanted mine to show the blog title, tag phrase, and the pages, but also want the majoirty of the first article or two to show, as well as my widgets. :) I’m always playing with the css, though, too…

  14. Mine is very minimalist, I hate all the wordpress themes because they give extensive space at the top of the blog to a header. I wanted mine to show the blog title, tag phrase, and the pages, but also want the majoirty of the first article or two to show, as well as my widgets. :) I’m always playing with the css, though, too…

  15. Minimizing noise is likely the same from one blog to another — in every case it’s about sticking to a defined topic without intra-post digressions and “fluff” posting intermixed with more topical posts. The strength of a “high signal” blog is probably most related to its focus on a well-defined (even narrow) but “meaty” topic.

    As an in-house attorney who deals extensively with copyright, one blog which immediately comes to mind as “high-signal-low-noise” is “The Patry Copyright Blog” (http://williampatry.blogspot.com/). This blog is written by William Patry, a senior copyright counsel for Google, and is a model for focus on and insight into a sometimes-difficult topic without extraneous filler.

    This points out a particular problem in defining “minimalist” blogs, however — that assessment (at least the way I put it above) is largely subjective. Rather than defining “minimalist” blogs by looking at signal-to-noise, it might be better to consider what such blogs really are — authoritative within their respective fields — and note that such authoritative blogs, amongst many characteristics, generally have a high signal-to-noise ratio.

    Again sticking to what I know better, legal blogs, I’d point out the “Sentencing Law and Policy” blog (http://sentencing.typepad.com/) as an example of the “authoritative” minimalist blog; this blog is not only authoritative in its coverage of its chosen topic, but its analysis of pending issues — its signal — is so strong that it’s frequently cited in cases and legal journals. What’s more high signal, after all, than influencing the direction of the field you report upon?

  16. No suggestions, but you’ve got me thinking about reducing the amount of clutter on my own blog. I think over time there’s a tendency to add more features instead of taking them out, which leads eventually to the classic MySpace blog (virtually unreadable with lots of flashing icons).

  17. Minimizing noise is likely the same from one blog to another — in every case it’s about sticking to a defined topic without intra-post digressions and “fluff” posting intermixed with more topical posts. The strength of a “high signal” blog is probably most related to its focus on a well-defined (even narrow) but “meaty” topic.

    As an in-house attorney who deals extensively with copyright, one blog which immediately comes to mind as “high-signal-low-noise” is “The Patry Copyright Blog” (http://williampatry.blogspot.com/). This blog is written by William Patry, a senior copyright counsel for Google, and is a model for focus on and insight into a sometimes-difficult topic without extraneous filler.

    This points out a particular problem in defining “minimalist” blogs, however — that assessment (at least the way I put it above) is largely subjective. Rather than defining “minimalist” blogs by looking at signal-to-noise, it might be better to consider what such blogs really are — authoritative within their respective fields — and note that such authoritative blogs, amongst many characteristics, generally have a high signal-to-noise ratio.

    Again sticking to what I know better, legal blogs, I’d point out the “Sentencing Law and Policy” blog (http://sentencing.typepad.com/) as an example of the “authoritative” minimalist blog; this blog is not only authoritative in its coverage of its chosen topic, but its analysis of pending issues — its signal — is so strong that it’s frequently cited in cases and legal journals. What’s more high signal, after all, than influencing the direction of the field you report upon?

  18. No suggestions, but you’ve got me thinking about reducing the amount of clutter on my own blog. I think over time there’s a tendency to add more features instead of taking them out, which leads eventually to the classic MySpace blog (virtually unreadable with lots of flashing icons).

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