My "anti-Scoble" commenter Chris Coulter joins PodTech

If you’ve been reading here for a while you know that Chris Coulter doesn’t exactly see eye to eye with me. He’s been the longest-running commenter on my blog, dating back to my days when I worked at NEC — most of those comments have disagreed with a position I’ve taken.

That’s why when he stayed at my house a few weeks back it raised eyebrows.

So, why hire someone like that?

Well, the side of the story you don’t see when he comments here is that he’s sent me more news than anyone else and he’s been consistently good. He has contacts all over the place and is what I call an “invisible influencer.” Someone who loves trading information with other people.

Podtech needs those skills as it builds out the news department. You might not see his name on a podcast, but you’ll feel his presence as he gets us to focus on the breaking stuff.

Second, he has video skills that I saw but other people wouldn’t have recognized. He helped run a wedding business, but was sending me lots of other stuff over the past few years, including lots of news about equipment and non-linear editors.

Third, he has writing skills. If you’ve ever suffered one of his barbs, you know that he can be quite persuasive with his writing. He’s also edited books, articles, and I’ve read a few of his screenplays and found his writing to be compact, insightful, gripping, etc. I’ve always wanted him to blog, while thankful that he wasn’t out there competing with me.

Fourth, if I’m going to grow as a manager and as a leader I need people I work with who see the world differently than I do. Translation: who can tell me I’m full of it. Why is that important? Well, beyond keeping the ego under check, it’s where great ideas come from. For instance, look at Irina. She doesn’t write with the style I use. Doesn’t see the world the way I do. But she came up with the Vloggies. Having diverse ideas on a team is important and brings better ideas.

Fifth, in person he’s a lot more fun to hang with than he comes across in the comments here.

So, he’ll help with editing my show, coming up with some new ideas (I’d love to do a “TechCrossfire” show with him, but not ready to announce anything like that), he’s gonna work on doing a blog for PodTech and help the news group set its priorities, and help do some other video shows and segments.

Anyway, that was my secret that I’ve been keeping a while. Glad to have Chris aboard.

68 thoughts on “My "anti-Scoble" commenter Chris Coulter joins PodTech

  1. @23. You saw them SPEAK???? Wow!!!!! Actually I have no idea why that point is even remotely relevant but if it makes you feel all that more important to add that, knock yourself out. Again, congrats on the great hire. Hope it results in further success.

  2. @23. You saw them SPEAK???? Wow!!!!! Actually I have no idea why that point is even remotely relevant but if it makes you feel all that more important to add that, knock yourself out. Again, congrats on the great hire. Hope it results in further success.

  3. This is one of the more interesting things you have written about (and done). Thanks for the inspiration.

  4. Years ago, a boss of mine suggested that I find my biggest critic (I was writing a technical monthly about Borland Delphi), and engage this critic in a discussion of how to improve things. I can remember him saying clearly, “Tim, passionate people are hard to find. If you find someone who’s complaining, it’s because they’re passionate about the subject. Don’t let that person get away.”

    Similarly, Patrick Lencioni comments on the need for “healthy conflict” in team environments, and says that frequently springs from a lack of trust. Robert, if you trust that Chris has the best interests of the organization at heart, why not value the conflict? The conflict represents an effort to make things better. We may disagree on strategy, and argue around until we get it right, but if we’re all shooting for the same thing, then we’ll be better off by listening to conflicting voices.

    This, in my opinion, is the major shortcoming of most political people (on both sides). We have no ability to even engage in a healthy discussion when we jump to immediately label a dissenting opinion as “knee-jerk liberal” or “right-wing nutjob.”

    Even more unfortunate, it seems technical people seem all-the-more inclined to this behavior because of the ability to hide behind behind the isolation of impersonal communication. Instead of a face-to-face meeting, we send an e-mail or leave an IM or a text.

    Tim

  5. Years ago, a boss of mine suggested that I find my biggest critic (I was writing a technical monthly about Borland Delphi), and engage this critic in a discussion of how to improve things. I can remember him saying clearly, “Tim, passionate people are hard to find. If you find someone who’s complaining, it’s because they’re passionate about the subject. Don’t let that person get away.”

    Similarly, Patrick Lencioni comments on the need for “healthy conflict” in team environments, and says that frequently springs from a lack of trust. Robert, if you trust that Chris has the best interests of the organization at heart, why not value the conflict? The conflict represents an effort to make things better. We may disagree on strategy, and argue around until we get it right, but if we’re all shooting for the same thing, then we’ll be better off by listening to conflicting voices.

    This, in my opinion, is the major shortcoming of most political people (on both sides). We have no ability to even engage in a healthy discussion when we jump to immediately label a dissenting opinion as “knee-jerk liberal” or “right-wing nutjob.”

    Even more unfortunate, it seems technical people seem all-the-more inclined to this behavior because of the ability to hide behind behind the isolation of impersonal communication. Instead of a face-to-face meeting, we send an e-mail or leave an IM or a text.

    Tim

  6. Again Robert,

    You are right on target. Encourage those who disagree with you,or who disagree with the system never to be silent. True growth and knowledge come from healthy discourse not flogging and flamming.

    Remember those who don’t work hard and study wind up as a Senator. ; ) Not in Iraq.

    Don’t forget to vote right. Transparent to a fault.

    Plieze chk teh spillin.
    Thank a SOLDIER when you read this.

  7. Again Robert,

    You are right on target. Encourage those who disagree with you,or who disagree with the system never to be silent. True growth and knowledge come from healthy discourse not flogging and flamming.

    Remember those who don’t work hard and study wind up as a Senator. ; ) Not in Iraq.

    Don’t forget to vote right. Transparent to a fault.

    Plieze chk teh spillin.
    Thank a SOLDIER when you read this.

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