The hot thing at Web 2.0 Summit: Photosynth

When I arrived at the Palace Hotel at least 10 people walked up to me and asked “did you see the Photosynth demo?”

By the end of the day it was very clear that Photosynth was the killer app of the Web 2.0 Summit and you can download it now. More on the Photosynth blog.

Comments

  1. Seems very nice. It comes across as an evolution of some excellent software called that adobe gobbled up and did nothing with. I forget the name now, but it began with a ‘C’

    I always wanted something more to come of this sort of tech..

  2. Seems very nice. It comes across as an evolution of some excellent software called that adobe gobbled up and did nothing with. I forget the name now, but it began with a ‘C’

    I always wanted something more to come of this sort of tech..

  3. yes again the same problem FF vs IE6/7 !!

    “Web Browser:IE6 or IE7; we hope to support other browsers in the future ”

    No support for FF — whats with MSFT ? cant they hear the community discourse ??

  4. yes again the same problem FF vs IE6/7 !!

    “Web Browser:IE6 or IE7; we hope to support other browsers in the future ”

    No support for FF — whats with MSFT ? cant they hear the community discourse ??

  5. Looks pretty neat. The technology seems to be able to extract ‘likeness’ from photos ala like.com plus do a whole lot more stuff. It makes me wonder how novel like.com’s tech really is.

  6. Looks pretty neat. The technology seems to be able to extract ‘likeness’ from photos ala like.com plus do a whole lot more stuff. It makes me wonder how novel like.com’s tech really is.

  7. [...] I tried out Photosynth today after reading about in Scoble’s blog, and it is really fascinating. Most web-based apps I’ve seen simply tried to emulate an existing desktop application and make it work within a browser. Photosynth is probably one of the few programs I’ve seen that actually did something new. For being a browser-based app, the performance is excellent. I don’t know if it is done in DirectX, but there was no lag or slowdown from running it on my Vista RC2 machine. [...]

  8. The initial experience of virtual walk is excellent…infact amazing too. But I still doubt if this app depends bit more on the skills of photographer too?

    Right now, it is not important that whether an application is being supported in my browser or not. Many of the famous apps are not released for mac or linux by default. They ported the apps in later stages. When I write a consumer level app like photosynth, i would prefer to target larger browser market share rather than passionated 10% firefox share. Atleast in my first phase of release…is’nt it?

    It’s a simple rule of software development..geeks might miss it in thier thoughts…:-)

  9. The initial experience of virtual walk is excellent…infact amazing too. But I still doubt if this app depends bit more on the skills of photographer too?

    Right now, it is not important that whether an application is being supported in my browser or not. Many of the famous apps are not released for mac or linux by default. They ported the apps in later stages. When I write a consumer level app like photosynth, i would prefer to target larger browser market share rather than passionated 10% firefox share. Atleast in my first phase of release…is’nt it?

    It’s a simple rule of software development..geeks might miss it in thier thoughts…:-)

  10. What’s interesting is the ability for Photosynth to create a 3D cloud from a collection of photos. All you have to do is to point it at a series of photos and there you go.

    imagine what it would be like if Photosynth was pointed at Flickr.

    amazing.

  11. What’s interesting is the ability for Photosynth to create a 3D cloud from a collection of photos. All you have to do is to point it at a series of photos and there you go.

    imagine what it would be like if Photosynth was pointed at Flickr.

    amazing.

  12. Loke: I will have a video up of Photosynth tomorrow done by Gary Flake. It simply is the most amazing demo I’ve seen this year. Stunning. Stunned me into silence.

  13. [...] (Yes, everything cool from Microsoft these days requires IE7.) The results are stunning, and navigation is surprisingly brisk. (Scobleizer notes this was the surprise hit of the Web 2.0 summit.) It’s really a different experience to see two-dimensional photos spacialized in the real world. I found myself drawn even more to the resulting geometries that the analysis creates, ethereal clusters of colored vertices extrapolated entirely from the photos. I hope in the final version you’ll have some control over what’s displayed, and, ideally, export for use in motion graphics and live visuals. [...]

  14. So… ActiveX is Web 2.0 now? Good to know. I guess that means Flash is Web 2.0 too. And Java applets, and Firefox extensions, and … I guess we’ve had Web 2.0 for quite a while now! Even, like, through that whole Web 1.0 stage! Pretty cool!

    Or, wait, is PhotoSynth Web 2.0 because at some stage it’s supposed to maybe allow you to share your photos with a community and merge them into a borderless, virtualised photo-world?

    Well, here’s an idea: why don’t we wait until it actually *does* that before we call it Web 2.0.

  15. So… ActiveX is Web 2.0 now? Good to know. I guess that means Flash is Web 2.0 too. And Java applets, and Firefox extensions, and … I guess we’ve had Web 2.0 for quite a while now! Even, like, through that whole Web 1.0 stage! Pretty cool!

    Or, wait, is PhotoSynth Web 2.0 because at some stage it’s supposed to maybe allow you to share your photos with a community and merge them into a borderless, virtualised photo-world?

    Well, here’s an idea: why don’t we wait until it actually *does* that before we call it Web 2.0.