WordPress.com doesn’t allow PayPerPost and other SEO gaming

Colleen at a Simple Kind of Life blog writes that WordPress.com doesn’t want to become home to spam bloggers and/or folks who make money off of advertising (she has an email that says that PayPerPost advertisements aren’t allowed on WordPress.com).

WordPress.com’s Terms of Service are very clear on this point, even highlighting it in blue.

This is a good thing for WordPress to do. Why? It protects its reputation. PayPerPost is a way to game search engines. If you want to do that, take your blog somewhere else and protect those of us who aren’t willing to do that.

Also, if you want to put lots of ads and things on your blog, why are you using a free service? Pay for a host and put that stuff somewhere else.

Comments

  1. “Also, if you want to put lots of ads and things on your blog, why are you using a free service? Pay for a host and put that stuff somewhere else.”

    Says Robert, advertising his book (twice) on his free WordPress.com blog ;-) Not saying you shouldn’t. But, it’s not that different from a sidebar of Google Ads.

  2. “Also, if you want to put lots of ads and things on your blog, why are you using a free service? Pay for a host and put that stuff somewhere else.”

    Says Robert, advertising his book (twice) on his free WordPress.com blog ;-) Not saying you shouldn’t. But, it’s not that different from a sidebar of Google Ads.

  3. [...] Wie ich heute bei Robert Scoble lesen durfte, will WordPress.com – der kostenlose Bloghosting-Ableger von automattic, den Machern von WordPress – keine PayPerPost-Blogger zulassen. In den Terms of service ist dieser Bereich sogar farbig hinterlegt, damit er auch keinem entgeht. Ich denke hier wie der scobleizer: Ein guter Schritt um den Ruf zu wahren: [...]

  4. Robert, some points:

    - Google’s page ranking/site ranking algorithm is probably one of the most closely guarded secrets out there. Having been studying and experimenting and reading extensively about SEO for several years now I can tell you that you can’t make a bold statement without being wrong.

    - “Links in the sidebar that appear every single day are FAR FAR FAR less ranked than links in the content part”. A couple of issues about that statement. First, unless Google scrutinizes the code and extracts the sidebar code from the rest of the page (which I doubt, given how big a job that would be – although some people are known to radically change the default template used by the various platforms in case Google do that), the sidebar is just a standard part of the page. Also, the sidebar is a constantly changing in terms of links (latest posts, etc).

    - A link, even in the sidebar (or header or footer, which are static) from a high PageRank site to a site with lower PR is almost always beneficial to the site getting the link. FACT.

  5. Robert, some points:

    - Google’s page ranking/site ranking algorithm is probably one of the most closely guarded secrets out there. Having been studying and experimenting and reading extensively about SEO for several years now I can tell you that you can’t make a bold statement without being wrong.

    - “Links in the sidebar that appear every single day are FAR FAR FAR less ranked than links in the content part”. A couple of issues about that statement. First, unless Google scrutinizes the code and extracts the sidebar code from the rest of the page (which I doubt, given how big a job that would be – although some people are known to radically change the default template used by the various platforms in case Google do that), the sidebar is just a standard part of the page. Also, the sidebar is a constantly changing in terms of links (latest posts, etc).

    - A link, even in the sidebar (or header or footer, which are static) from a high PageRank site to a site with lower PR is almost always beneficial to the site getting the link. FACT.

  6. B3H3: it has SOME effect, but a minor one compared to text. It’s VERY easy to filter out. Why? Blogrolls don’t change from day to day. Just do a diff on my page from day to day. You’ll see the crap over to the right never changes, while the crap on the left changes radically. So, Google or MSN or Yahoo can apply a far heavier weight to the stuff on the left.

  7. B3H3: it has SOME effect, but a minor one compared to text. It’s VERY easy to filter out. Why? Blogrolls don’t change from day to day. Just do a diff on my page from day to day. You’ll see the crap over to the right never changes, while the crap on the left changes radically. So, Google or MSN or Yahoo can apply a far heavier weight to the stuff on the left.

  8. I agree with the comment about the side bar being different.
    Nothing worse than being forced to listen to the MSN video commercials before viewing your next selection; one forced viewing is more than enough … two is annoying … three is just plain obnoxious.

    Robert,
    Please add the ability to fast forward through the videos on your blog for those of us trying to sip from the firehose.

  9. I agree with the comment about the side bar being different.
    Nothing worse than being forced to listen to the MSN video commercials before viewing your next selection; one forced viewing is more than enough … two is annoying … three is just plain obnoxious.

    Robert,
    Please add the ability to fast forward through the videos on your blog for those of us trying to sip from the firehose.

  10. WordPress.com is a free service that doesn’t even allow AdSense on the free blogs it hosts — and that has nothing to do with SEO. This is just a move to push growing traffic semi-pro bloggers to its $250/month VIP service or out. Personally, I don’t think that’s a smart business move (it will be awfully hard to cover their hosting costs if they are left with ad-phobic bloggers who can’t afford $250/month).

    The beauty is that Posties are earning more than enough now to take their blogs elsewhere and are doing so — achieving the ‘American Dream’ of blogging: to own your own domain ;-)

  11. WordPress.com is a free service that doesn’t even allow AdSense on the free blogs it hosts — and that has nothing to do with SEO. This is just a move to push growing traffic semi-pro bloggers to its $250/month VIP service or out. Personally, I don’t think that’s a smart business move (it will be awfully hard to cover their hosting costs if they are left with ad-phobic bloggers who can’t afford $250/month).

    The beauty is that Posties are earning more than enough now to take their blogs elsewhere and are doing so — achieving the ‘American Dream’ of blogging: to own your own domain ;-)

  12. Russ: >>Please add the ability to fast forward through the videos on your blog for those of us trying to sip from the firehose.

    You’ll get that when we start doing other formats. Unfortunately that won’t be the next two weeks.

  13. Russ: >>Please add the ability to fast forward through the videos on your blog for those of us trying to sip from the firehose.

    You’ll get that when we start doing other formats. Unfortunately that won’t be the next two weeks.

  14. VC Dan: Matt will do advertising when the time is right. He wants WordPress.com to have a certain image and wants to set it apart from other cluttered Web hosting sites like MySpace. Personally I think that’s awesome.

    And, the less commercial he can keep this, the better, personally.

    I’m going to have him pull off the Sphere links cause those just aren’t ready for prime time and they are slowing down my page load.

  15. VC Dan: Matt will do advertising when the time is right. He wants WordPress.com to have a certain image and wants to set it apart from other cluttered Web hosting sites like MySpace. Personally I think that’s awesome.

    And, the less commercial he can keep this, the better, personally.

    I’m going to have him pull off the Sphere links cause those just aren’t ready for prime time and they are slowing down my page load.

  16. “it has SOME effect, but a minor one compared to text. It’s VERY easy to filter out.”

    Hey, if you don’t believe me, experiment. You have a high PR (8). Link to a low PR site and wait a few months. Heck, you could even sell the links! :-)

  17. “it has SOME effect, but a minor one compared to text. It’s VERY easy to filter out.”

    Hey, if you don’t believe me, experiment. You have a high PR (8). Link to a low PR site and wait a few months. Heck, you could even sell the links! :-)

  18. Robert,

    I don’t see Sphere slowing down your page load.

    WordPress itself is what is not ready for prime time, on the self-hosted version it’s currently a web 1.0 software in need of a major overhaul.

  19. Robert,

    I don’t see Sphere slowing down your page load.

    WordPress itself is what is not ready for prime time, on the self-hosted version it’s currently a web 1.0 software in need of a major overhaul.

  20. the Left vs Right is an interesting phenomenon, but I’m still not sure that we can rule either way. Working at MS, Scoble might have some inside information that we don’t, but that’s beside the point.

    The difference between content links and sidebar links is that content links only stay there for a few days. So in some cases they may not help at all.

    Example, if Google doesn’t spider the page often, it may never see that link except after it’s made it to the “archive” section… maybe even 2 or 3 clicks away from the main page. Typically these archives have lower pageranks than site’s main pages.

    Also, if we look at the concept of a link as a reference as in academic papers (the original Google premise) It would dictate that a permanent reference counts more than a temporary reference. Or, every time you visit i’m reccomending the links in the sidebar, whereas I’m only reccomending the content links once.

    It’s really hard to say, as I can make a compelling argument for each case.

    As for wordpress being clean, that’s awesome. If only they’d make it easier (I mean super easy, no code editing) for bloggers to customize their comment form, maybe it would cut down on that spam too. Somethign as simple as a “type the name of this blog in this box” or “type Scoble here” would be sufficinent enough so that automated scripts would have a hard time posting comments.

    The math captcha is great, but easily crackable since it’s widely used. Same with other captchas. The trick here isn’t to make it harder for bots to crack, but to make it so thinks vary so greatly that it’s pointless to make a bot in the first place.

  21. the Left vs Right is an interesting phenomenon, but I’m still not sure that we can rule either way. Working at MS, Scoble might have some inside information that we don’t, but that’s beside the point.

    The difference between content links and sidebar links is that content links only stay there for a few days. So in some cases they may not help at all.

    Example, if Google doesn’t spider the page often, it may never see that link except after it’s made it to the “archive” section… maybe even 2 or 3 clicks away from the main page. Typically these archives have lower pageranks than site’s main pages.

    Also, if we look at the concept of a link as a reference as in academic papers (the original Google premise) It would dictate that a permanent reference counts more than a temporary reference. Or, every time you visit i’m reccomending the links in the sidebar, whereas I’m only reccomending the content links once.

    It’s really hard to say, as I can make a compelling argument for each case.

    As for wordpress being clean, that’s awesome. If only they’d make it easier (I mean super easy, no code editing) for bloggers to customize their comment form, maybe it would cut down on that spam too. Somethign as simple as a “type the name of this blog in this box” or “type Scoble here” would be sufficinent enough so that automated scripts would have a hard time posting comments.

    The math captcha is great, but easily crackable since it’s widely used. Same with other captchas. The trick here isn’t to make it harder for bots to crack, but to make it so thinks vary so greatly that it’s pointless to make a bot in the first place.

  22. Just to be clear from WordPress.com’s side: we don’t allow any commercial ads or links at this time – PayPerPost or anyone else. We’ve been asking our user community what kind of commercial activity makes sense on WordPress.com. Most of our users prefer ad-free blogs. Some have suggested ideas for making blogs more commercial. We are evaluating those and are always open to additional suggestions. Our first step in this direction is our VIP hosting program (http://wordpress.com/vip-hosting/) which gives bloggers control over their blog template and ad serving (and which Robert’s blog is part of).

  23. Just to be clear from WordPress.com’s side: we don’t allow any commercial ads or links at this time – PayPerPost or anyone else. We’ve been asking our user community what kind of commercial activity makes sense on WordPress.com. Most of our users prefer ad-free blogs. Some have suggested ideas for making blogs more commercial. We are evaluating those and are always open to additional suggestions. Our first step in this direction is our VIP hosting program (http://wordpress.com/vip-hosting/) which gives bloggers control over their blog template and ad serving (and which Robert’s blog is part of).

  24. Thank you, Toni, for explaining that this isn’t as vicious as the OP was trying to make it sound. I agree that WordPress has to look out for its own commercial interests first. I am glad that you have explained the TRUTH of the situation.

  25. Thank you, Toni, for explaining that this isn’t as vicious as the OP was trying to make it sound. I agree that WordPress has to look out for its own commercial interests first. I am glad that you have explained the TRUTH of the situation.

  26. The WordPress.com TOS says “boost the search engine rankings of third party sites”

    I guess that means you can no longer link to your wife’s blog because you’re trying to help boost her search engine rankings.

  27. The WordPress.com TOS says “boost the search engine rankings of third party sites”

    I guess that means you can no longer link to your wife’s blog because you’re trying to help boost her search engine rankings.

  28. How do the folks at WordPress.com know your intentions when you create a link? If it’s ok to link to a site because you think it’s cool, but it’s a TOS violation to link to a site to boost search ranking, who gets to determine your intentions?

  29. How do the folks at WordPress.com know your intentions when you create a link? If it’s ok to link to a site because you think it’s cool, but it’s a TOS violation to link to a site to boost search ranking, who gets to determine your intentions?

  30. Hi Robert

    You should maybe define SEO gaming, because last time you discussed it you accused B5 Media of SEO gaming, yet WordPress.com with their category tagging system might be looked on by many as gaming SEO even more.

    WordPress.com Linking Structure

    As to other commenters, Robert is a part of the VIP program, so this is a commercial blog, and Robert could probably use a service such as PPP or ReviewME (just launched) and not break the WordPress.com ToS.
    (please note I am not saying he would)

    It also allows him to link through to his Podtech site frequently, which is again a commercial link.

    This is however from what I can see quite a recent change. Until quite recently Robert’s blog was not part of the VIP program, and still had links to Podtech…

    It seems to me if the WordPress.com ToS was being universally enforced, that a large number of blogs are breaking the ToS, because they have some kind of commercial interest in the sites they link to.

    There are real SEO and traffic benefits to have a blog on WordPress.com

    One interesting thing I have noticed is that many members of the core development team, or those that get listed on http://planet.wordpress.org/ at least appear to have paid text link adverts on their sites.

    I am not sure who is automatically added to blogrolls on wordpress.com these days, but there are some similarities in the monetization model.

    In subjects like this, even people who try to maintain a “holier than thou” attitude sometimes get caught out.

  31. Hi Robert

    You should maybe define SEO gaming, because last time you discussed it you accused B5 Media of SEO gaming, yet WordPress.com with their category tagging system might be looked on by many as gaming SEO even more.

    WordPress.com Linking Structure

    As to other commenters, Robert is a part of the VIP program, so this is a commercial blog, and Robert could probably use a service such as PPP or ReviewME (just launched) and not break the WordPress.com ToS.
    (please note I am not saying he would)

    It also allows him to link through to his Podtech site frequently, which is again a commercial link.

    This is however from what I can see quite a recent change. Until quite recently Robert’s blog was not part of the VIP program, and still had links to Podtech…

    It seems to me if the WordPress.com ToS was being universally enforced, that a large number of blogs are breaking the ToS, because they have some kind of commercial interest in the sites they link to.

    There are real SEO and traffic benefits to have a blog on WordPress.com

    One interesting thing I have noticed is that many members of the core development team, or those that get listed on http://planet.wordpress.org/ at least appear to have paid text link adverts on their sites.

    I am not sure who is automatically added to blogrolls on wordpress.com these days, but there are some similarities in the monetization model.

    In subjects like this, even people who try to maintain a “holier than thou” attitude sometimes get caught out.

  32. Every service has the right to have its own TOS, and wordpress.com is a wonderful free service. You can go there with the knowledge that you will not have music blaring and flash advertising, and they have made the choice to not allow free blogs to profit from PayPerPost, will they take the same line on ReviewMe?

    We have been playing with payperpost on our own hosted site. If you look at the front login page at payperpost they have Colleen 692 as a top earner with
    $2,835.42. I have no idea how many wordpress.com blogs she is running to get that much money, but I would guess more than one.

    We are at $85 for 15 posts and it will buy groceries this month.

  33. Every service has the right to have its own TOS, and wordpress.com is a wonderful free service. You can go there with the knowledge that you will not have music blaring and flash advertising, and they have made the choice to not allow free blogs to profit from PayPerPost, will they take the same line on ReviewMe?

    We have been playing with payperpost on our own hosted site. If you look at the front login page at payperpost they have Colleen 692 as a top earner with
    $2,835.42. I have no idea how many wordpress.com blogs she is running to get that much money, but I would guess more than one.

    We are at $85 for 15 posts and it will buy groceries this month.

  34. Andy (and others), yes the lines for what is commercial or not can get blurry. We try our best to be consistent without creating lots of complicated rules. The easy cases are ones where the primary purpose of the blog is to drive traffic to ads or to some other site or affiliate program. Most people agree that those are spam blogs and unwanted. Rather than let them run on our site and look the other way (and collect a cut of the revenues) we shut them down, on the order of tens of thousands of blogs since we started this service.

    Then there are blogs with legitimate content who want to sign up for commercial third party services like AdSense or PayPerPost to make money. We’ve not (yet) enabled/allowed that because we wanted to build a service that is about great blogging content first (and making money later). So far, this approach seems to resonate with bloggers and readers alike (for example, 18 million unique visitors came to wordpress.com blogs in Sept). For those of our users who would like to start making money from their blogs, we are looking into various options for the future.

    As far as wordpress.org developers who get linked, that’s completely separate from the wordpress.com service. Those links are a way to provide recognition to the people who donate considerable amounts of time and talent to the open source project.

  35. Andy (and others), yes the lines for what is commercial or not can get blurry. We try our best to be consistent without creating lots of complicated rules. The easy cases are ones where the primary purpose of the blog is to drive traffic to ads or to some other site or affiliate program. Most people agree that those are spam blogs and unwanted. Rather than let them run on our site and look the other way (and collect a cut of the revenues) we shut them down, on the order of tens of thousands of blogs since we started this service.

    Then there are blogs with legitimate content who want to sign up for commercial third party services like AdSense or PayPerPost to make money. We’ve not (yet) enabled/allowed that because we wanted to build a service that is about great blogging content first (and making money later). So far, this approach seems to resonate with bloggers and readers alike (for example, 18 million unique visitors came to wordpress.com blogs in Sept). For those of our users who would like to start making money from their blogs, we are looking into various options for the future.

    As far as wordpress.org developers who get linked, that’s completely separate from the wordpress.com service. Those links are a way to provide recognition to the people who donate considerable amounts of time and talent to the open source project.

  36. Hi Toni

    My interpretation of what you are saying is that if someone was employed as a freelancer for PayPerPost, and every few days made posts similar to

    “on the Pay Per Post blog today a great new service was announced, here are the details.
    blah blah blah
    I think this is a great idea
    blah blah blah
    Here is a link [link]“

    The blogger is employed on an ad hoc basis by PayPerPost.

    They don’t earn as much money quite probably as Robert does at Podtech, but there are huge similarities.

    How about more blurring of the lines

    My wife is out today so I have been playing with a new toy, you can take a look at it over on my other Tech blog [link]

    The only way you can have such clear cut rules is a system of no linking to sites outside wordpress.com

    As far as wordpress.org developers who get linked, that’s completely separate from the wordpress.com service. Those links are a way to provide recognition to the people who donate considerable amounts of time and talent to the open source project.

    As I said, I had no idea what is currently linked to by default in the blogroll for WordPress.com. I knew what is current for WP.2.0.x
    I have now quickly checked out a test wp.com, and there is a difference now, both in the blogroll and the contents of what is showed in the dashboard.

    I am not criticizing anyone for monetizing the popularity or authority status of their sites.
    They deserve whatever income they receive, and TLA, PPP, ReviewMe etc are effective ways to monetize for many.

    If/When PPP posts start appearing within the posts from planet.wordpress.org, I wouldn’t complain about that in itself either.

    In the analysis of the WP linking structure I even openly admit I have used tactics that are more grey. It is all totally white hat… at least to some.

    You see it is great to be able to start a blog on almost any subject, use categories, and be almost guaranteed PR5 or PR6 in 3 months time.
    That is the advantage of being in a network of almost 500,000 blogs.

    But Robert in his title is saying WordPress.com doesn’t practice SEO gaming, yet in the comments of a previous post he likened a blog network to being gaming the search engines.

    Robert is also saying the sidebar has no effect, which it totally wrong. A blogroll can totally kill your pagerank, especially if you have it on every page.
    (warning WP.com users should also avoid linking to commercial sites in their blogroll)

    Ryan’s blog is a good example of how to link to 3rd party sites, he has a seperate friends page.

    His site still has lots of “ball linking” but it takes a lot of smart plugins to remove that “feature” of a blogging platform.

    Methods of earning money and the blurring of lines are going to become more and more tricky, to the extent that without a court order you will never be able to prove whether someone is earning money for a post or not.

    IMHO PPP is more honest (from an SEO perspective) that the wordpress.com linking structure.

    Many would class both as still being white hat.

  37. Hi Toni

    My interpretation of what you are saying is that if someone was employed as a freelancer for PayPerPost, and every few days made posts similar to

    “on the Pay Per Post blog today a great new service was announced, here are the details.
    blah blah blah
    I think this is a great idea
    blah blah blah
    Here is a link [link]“

    The blogger is employed on an ad hoc basis by PayPerPost.

    They don’t earn as much money quite probably as Robert does at Podtech, but there are huge similarities.

    How about more blurring of the lines

    My wife is out today so I have been playing with a new toy, you can take a look at it over on my other Tech blog [link]

    The only way you can have such clear cut rules is a system of no linking to sites outside wordpress.com

    As far as wordpress.org developers who get linked, that’s completely separate from the wordpress.com service. Those links are a way to provide recognition to the people who donate considerable amounts of time and talent to the open source project.

    As I said, I had no idea what is currently linked to by default in the blogroll for WordPress.com. I knew what is current for WP.2.0.x
    I have now quickly checked out a test wp.com, and there is a difference now, both in the blogroll and the contents of what is showed in the dashboard.

    I am not criticizing anyone for monetizing the popularity or authority status of their sites.
    They deserve whatever income they receive, and TLA, PPP, ReviewMe etc are effective ways to monetize for many.

    If/When PPP posts start appearing within the posts from planet.wordpress.org, I wouldn’t complain about that in itself either.

    In the analysis of the WP linking structure I even openly admit I have used tactics that are more grey. It is all totally white hat… at least to some.

    You see it is great to be able to start a blog on almost any subject, use categories, and be almost guaranteed PR5 or PR6 in 3 months time.
    That is the advantage of being in a network of almost 500,000 blogs.

    But Robert in his title is saying WordPress.com doesn’t practice SEO gaming, yet in the comments of a previous post he likened a blog network to being gaming the search engines.

    Robert is also saying the sidebar has no effect, which it totally wrong. A blogroll can totally kill your pagerank, especially if you have it on every page.
    (warning WP.com users should also avoid linking to commercial sites in their blogroll)

    Ryan’s blog is a good example of how to link to 3rd party sites, he has a seperate friends page.

    His site still has lots of “ball linking” but it takes a lot of smart plugins to remove that “feature” of a blogging platform.

    Methods of earning money and the blurring of lines are going to become more and more tricky, to the extent that without a court order you will never be able to prove whether someone is earning money for a post or not.

    IMHO PPP is more honest (from an SEO perspective) that the wordpress.com linking structure.

    Many would class both as still being white hat.

  38. The above post was from me, the test account I setup in the middle of posting and the cookies thus created overrode the information I entered in the comment fields.

  39. The above post was from me, the test account I setup in the middle of posting and the cookies thus created overrode the information I entered in the comment fields.

  40. Andy: I never said it had no effect, just that it had little effect.

    Here, try this. Get four bloggers to add a plumber’s site into their blogroll. Then get four separate bloggers with equal Google standing to write “best plumber” and link that into their content.

    Measure the results. It’s not even going to be close. The content will beat the blog rolls every time by a HUGE mile.

    Truth is that PageRank doesn’t matter anymore. It matters WHAT YOU LINK TO WITH WHAT KEYWORDS YOU USE.

    This is why the venture capital community is throwing money at these new advertising schemes. They know that it’s the new SEO cause simply linking on the sidebar isn’t working anymore.

  41. Andy: I never said it had no effect, just that it had little effect.

    Here, try this. Get four bloggers to add a plumber’s site into their blogroll. Then get four separate bloggers with equal Google standing to write “best plumber” and link that into their content.

    Measure the results. It’s not even going to be close. The content will beat the blog rolls every time by a HUGE mile.

    Truth is that PageRank doesn’t matter anymore. It matters WHAT YOU LINK TO WITH WHAT KEYWORDS YOU USE.

    This is why the venture capital community is throwing money at these new advertising schemes. They know that it’s the new SEO cause simply linking on the sidebar isn’t working anymore.

  42. “Here, try this. Get four bloggers to add a plumber’s site into their blogroll. Then get four separate bloggers with equal Google standing to write “best plumber” and link that into their content.

    Measure the results. It’s not even going to be close. The content will beat the blog rolls every time by a HUGE mile.”

    I think you misunderstand the difference between PageRank and keyword selection. Four links wityh “best plumber” would have negligible effect because of the dilution of the keywords.

    “This is why the venture capital community is throwing money at these new advertising schemes. They know that it’s the new SEO cause simply linking on the sidebar isn’t working anymore.”

    They’re throwing their money because they have money to throw. It doesn’t say anything about effectivness. The reason that sidebar linking isn’t working any more is that people’s sidebars are a finite resource.

  43. “Here, try this. Get four bloggers to add a plumber’s site into their blogroll. Then get four separate bloggers with equal Google standing to write “best plumber” and link that into their content.

    Measure the results. It’s not even going to be close. The content will beat the blog rolls every time by a HUGE mile.”

    I think you misunderstand the difference between PageRank and keyword selection. Four links wityh “best plumber” would have negligible effect because of the dilution of the keywords.

    “This is why the venture capital community is throwing money at these new advertising schemes. They know that it’s the new SEO cause simply linking on the sidebar isn’t working anymore.”

    They’re throwing their money because they have money to throw. It doesn’t say anything about effectivness. The reason that sidebar linking isn’t working any more is that people’s sidebars are a finite resource.

  44. Robert, you’re confused, though understandably so.

    You’re mixing-up two different factors – recency and PageRank.

    A new link has a recency effect, which is not the same as PageRank.

    Moreover, a new link in a post from a popular blogger can initially carry the PageRank of the front page PLUS recency, which makes it very powerful at first. When it moves off the front page, it loses that PageRank power and carries only the PageRank of the permalink page.

    Of course PageRank plus relevant keywords is better than PageRank without relevant keywords.

    PageRank matters. It’s just not the only factor – Google even says that outright.

  45. Robert, you’re confused, though understandably so.

    You’re mixing-up two different factors – recency and PageRank.

    A new link has a recency effect, which is not the same as PageRank.

    Moreover, a new link in a post from a popular blogger can initially carry the PageRank of the front page PLUS recency, which makes it very powerful at first. When it moves off the front page, it loses that PageRank power and carries only the PageRank of the permalink page.

    Of course PageRank plus relevant keywords is better than PageRank without relevant keywords.

    PageRank matters. It’s just not the only factor – Google even says that outright.

  46. Pagerank is a finate thing, that originates from the creation of a page.
    Pagerank can be transferred to that page, and the page can transfer pagerank to other pages.

    A page on a higher PR website is sometimes worth more, because other pages on that domain give the page a little or large boost.

    Linking structure is highly important.

    I went to some poor guys website that is 16 months old, a highly respectable podcaster, and see his Pagerank was only 3 for the front page, 2 for categories, and 1 or 0 for all his content (even the aged content)

    He didn’t have many incoming links to his front page, but he had many links coming in to his blog content.

    The problem was his blog content was being sucked dry by the number of links he had in his blogroll.

    I actually tell my readers don’t put a link to me in their blogroll. Sure it would be of benefit to me, but I honestly don’t want to have a negative effect on their own search engine results.

    If you realy think sidebar adverts are not working, why do you think text link ads is so popular?

    The value in PPP or ReviewMe type advertising is that it is a link for life, not based on monthly fees.

    The big problem is that the way most blogs are setup, the amount of PR that is given to an external link is minimal in the longterm.

    As an example, your current linking structure probably doesn’t retain most of the PR you are gaining from outside links. It is retaining pagerank like a sieve and only the newest content is receiving any PR from internal pages.
    Then again you have the benefit of being on WP.com, so you are gaining a fair amount of pagerank to waste.

    There are good reasons why your old domain might still rank higher than your new domain when searching for your name. Your sitewide link to your old blogroll is one good example.

    Do you really want to give Wikipedia that much PR compared to your own content?

  47. Pagerank is a finate thing, that originates from the creation of a page.
    Pagerank can be transferred to that page, and the page can transfer pagerank to other pages.

    A page on a higher PR website is sometimes worth more, because other pages on that domain give the page a little or large boost.

    Linking structure is highly important.

    I went to some poor guys website that is 16 months old, a highly respectable podcaster, and see his Pagerank was only 3 for the front page, 2 for categories, and 1 or 0 for all his content (even the aged content)

    He didn’t have many incoming links to his front page, but he had many links coming in to his blog content.

    The problem was his blog content was being sucked dry by the number of links he had in his blogroll.

    I actually tell my readers don’t put a link to me in their blogroll. Sure it would be of benefit to me, but I honestly don’t want to have a negative effect on their own search engine results.

    If you realy think sidebar adverts are not working, why do you think text link ads is so popular?

    The value in PPP or ReviewMe type advertising is that it is a link for life, not based on monthly fees.

    The big problem is that the way most blogs are setup, the amount of PR that is given to an external link is minimal in the longterm.

    As an example, your current linking structure probably doesn’t retain most of the PR you are gaining from outside links. It is retaining pagerank like a sieve and only the newest content is receiving any PR from internal pages.
    Then again you have the benefit of being on WP.com, so you are gaining a fair amount of pagerank to waste.

    There are good reasons why your old domain might still rank higher than your new domain when searching for your name. Your sitewide link to your old blogroll is one good example.

    Do you really want to give Wikipedia that much PR compared to your own content?

  48. “We have been playing with payperpost on our own hosted site. If you look at the front login page at payperpost they have Colleen 692 as a top earner with
    $2,835.42. I have no idea how many wordpress.com blogs she is running to get that much money, but I would guess more than one.”

    I don’t have any blogs on wordpress.com – I use WP on my own domain. I use 2 blogs for PayPerPost, and that total is since July, posting 3 opps per day. It’s not hard to do.

  49. “We have been playing with payperpost on our own hosted site. If you look at the front login page at payperpost they have Colleen 692 as a top earner with
    $2,835.42. I have no idea how many wordpress.com blogs she is running to get that much money, but I would guess more than one.”

    I don’t have any blogs on wordpress.com – I use WP on my own domain. I use 2 blogs for PayPerPost, and that total is since July, posting 3 opps per day. It’s not hard to do.

  50. Collen, I was confused. I thought that the email from WordPress.com was to you. I did not know that you had been working with PPP since July. My apologies.

    To VC DAN, “(it will be awfully hard to cover their hosting costs if they are left with ad-phobic bloggers who can’t afford $250/month)”

    Actually I think Automattic is doing alright with wordpress.com, and has the best service. My wife and I were talking tonight about the fact that we have been spending about 2 hours a day doing payperpost related stuff and if we were to do that much work building something of value, it would be worth much more than the revenue we are getting from PPP. It is a bummer to spend 30 min working on something only to have the opportunity not work because of some software glitch on PPP. I think that it can work for some but not on our main blog, it just looks to cheap. And then if I spend the time building 2 “PPP” blogs that meet the requirements, I really should have built something that I really care about. I think that PPP is going to make a killing, and I can see that you guys are working like crazy. I am just finding that I need to spend my blogging time more effectively. And I think our PPP posts that get 4 or 5 comments are worth a whole lot more than 5 bucks.

  51. Collen, I was confused. I thought that the email from WordPress.com was to you. I did not know that you had been working with PPP since July. My apologies.

    To VC DAN, “(it will be awfully hard to cover their hosting costs if they are left with ad-phobic bloggers who can’t afford $250/month)”

    Actually I think Automattic is doing alright with wordpress.com, and has the best service. My wife and I were talking tonight about the fact that we have been spending about 2 hours a day doing payperpost related stuff and if we were to do that much work building something of value, it would be worth much more than the revenue we are getting from PPP. It is a bummer to spend 30 min working on something only to have the opportunity not work because of some software glitch on PPP. I think that it can work for some but not on our main blog, it just looks to cheap. And then if I spend the time building 2 “PPP” blogs that meet the requirements, I really should have built something that I really care about. I think that PPP is going to make a killing, and I can see that you guys are working like crazy. I am just finding that I need to spend my blogging time more effectively. And I think our PPP posts that get 4 or 5 comments are worth a whole lot more than 5 bucks.

  52. I’m not a PPP fan, but I’m in agreement with Andy when he tries to flesh out the WP logic. It feels morally happy when you set out a no PPP rule for the ‘little people’ using your free service. Your legislating that since you don’t like it you are not going to allow it, certainly within your rights, but heavy handed to say the least.

    I’ve always thought the default blogroll in downloaded WP and on WP.com was a brilliant way to reward those who developed by giving them pagerank. It cheapens what you are doing there when you say WP doesn’t game SEO, because you do, and you obviously think we are too stupid to see it.

    Like I said, I don’t fault WP for doing this, I think it’s smart. But don’t act like you don’t do it…

  53. I’m not a PPP fan, but I’m in agreement with Andy when he tries to flesh out the WP logic. It feels morally happy when you set out a no PPP rule for the ‘little people’ using your free service. Your legislating that since you don’t like it you are not going to allow it, certainly within your rights, but heavy handed to say the least.

    I’ve always thought the default blogroll in downloaded WP and on WP.com was a brilliant way to reward those who developed by giving them pagerank. It cheapens what you are doing there when you say WP doesn’t game SEO, because you do, and you obviously think we are too stupid to see it.

    Like I said, I don’t fault WP for doing this, I think it’s smart. But don’t act like you don’t do it…

  54. Robyn, as I said above, we don’t allow _any_ commercial services. Like AdSense and lots of others, PayPerRoll falls into the category of commercial services and is therefore not (yet) allowed. This is not a “morally happy” stance (nor related to SEO issues), it’s the way we set out to provide our service from day one and the way the majority of our users like it.
    PS: Default WordPress.com blogs link to wordpress.com and wordpress.org. That’s it.

  55. Robyn, as I said above, we don’t allow _any_ commercial services. Like AdSense and lots of others, PayPerRoll falls into the category of commercial services and is therefore not (yet) allowed. This is not a “morally happy” stance (nor related to SEO issues), it’s the way we set out to provide our service from day one and the way the majority of our users like it.
    PS: Default WordPress.com blogs link to wordpress.com and wordpress.org. That’s it.

  56. PayPerPost is blogwhoring. It destroys the web of trust and credibility of the blogosphere. The issue is not monetizing a blog, it’s the hidden or blatant commercial motive of the paid opinion.

    If your boyfriend started saying he loves you, a lot more than usual, then you find out he was part of, say, a university experiment that paid him $20 each time he expressed love to you, would you not be annoyed and disappointed?

    Same thing in the blogosphere. Nothing wrong with monetizing your blog, as long as you keep the 9 core values of blogging in mind.

  57. PayPerPost is blogwhoring. It destroys the web of trust and credibility of the blogosphere. The issue is not monetizing a blog, it’s the hidden or blatant commercial motive of the paid opinion.

    If your boyfriend started saying he loves you, a lot more than usual, then you find out he was part of, say, a university experiment that paid him $20 each time he expressed love to you, would you not be annoyed and disappointed?

    Same thing in the blogosphere. Nothing wrong with monetizing your blog, as long as you keep the 9 core values of blogging in mind.

  58. [...] Toni Schneider von wordpress.com erklärt das in einem Kommentar bei Scobleizer wie folgt: Just to be clear from WordPress.com’s side: we don’t allow any commercial ads or links at this time – PayPerPost or anyone else. We’ve been asking our user community what kind of commercial activity makes sense on WordPress.com. Most of our users prefer ad-free blogs. Some have suggested ideas for making blogs more commercial. We are evaluating those and are always open to additional suggestions. Our first step in this direction is our VIP hosting program (wordpress.com/vip-hosting/) which gives bloggers control over their blog template and ad serving (and which Robert’s blog is part of). [...]

  59. I think the main reason they dont allow advertising as they want to make money off your content but dont want to let you, as it makes them less valuable.

    Blogger allows and encourages google ads. WordPress doesnt, but sometimes randomly put google ads on some blogs.

    Blogger has a better policy, makes podcasting very easy, is easier to use in general and is better for begininers. Plus the fact they allow ads doesnt make them harder to read.

    Taking a cold look at it, Id move away from wordpress if i could afford my own personal domain. The proverb start as you mean to go on, springs to mind.

  60. I think the main reason they dont allow advertising as they want to make money off your content but dont want to let you, as it makes them less valuable.

    Blogger allows and encourages google ads. WordPress doesnt, but sometimes randomly put google ads on some blogs.

    Blogger has a better policy, makes podcasting very easy, is easier to use in general and is better for begininers. Plus the fact they allow ads doesnt make them harder to read.

    Taking a cold look at it, Id move away from wordpress if i could afford my own personal domain. The proverb start as you mean to go on, springs to mind.

  61. Toni@37: I respect how you guys are building WordPress.com. My comments were mainly advice about potentially painting yourself in a corner with a “no-ads stance” because you will eventually need a revenue model to pay those hosting bills.

    Keep up the great work and, give some thought to reserving your ad-blocking for models that don’t involve blogger content freedom the way PayPerPost does — I think WP.com needs to remain a champion of blogger content freedom. Blocking AdSense, TLA or other banner-like approaches doesn’t get into censorship the way blocking user generated content would.

    Also, thanks for clarifying this isn’t related to SEO issues, but about blocking all commercial services, whether it be AdSense, PayPerPost or other monetization options for bloggers. I understand this takes time and you’re trying to get the whole model right. Keep up the good work!

  62. Toni@37: I respect how you guys are building WordPress.com. My comments were mainly advice about potentially painting yourself in a corner with a “no-ads stance” because you will eventually need a revenue model to pay those hosting bills.

    Keep up the great work and, give some thought to reserving your ad-blocking for models that don’t involve blogger content freedom the way PayPerPost does — I think WP.com needs to remain a champion of blogger content freedom. Blocking AdSense, TLA or other banner-like approaches doesn’t get into censorship the way blocking user generated content would.

    Also, thanks for clarifying this isn’t related to SEO issues, but about blocking all commercial services, whether it be AdSense, PayPerPost or other monetization options for bloggers. I understand this takes time and you’re trying to get the whole model right. Keep up the good work!

  63. [...] The rub: WordPress.com — as least as of right now — has a policy of no ads on its blogs, which, unless I’m missing something, dramatically limits any direct revenue opportunities. This, in turn, relegates WordPress.com to a hobbyist blog engine, not something suitable for someone who entertains ideas of taking a blog pro/full-time. There’s a great discussion on Scobleizer about this — check out the comments. [...]

  64. >>is a way to game search engines.

    Weren’t you recently advocating a Googlebomb?

    So ‘gaming the engines’ is okay, as long as it’s for a cause YOU agree with with? Your ‘sidebar’ argument is pretty weak too. You’re advertising on a freely hosted blog.

    So, you advertise on your blog and you tried to game the engines from your blog, AND, you tried to enlist the help of others to help you game the engines. Is it hard to sit down at the keyboard with one foot in your mouth?

  65. >>is a way to game search engines.

    Weren’t you recently advocating a Googlebomb?

    So ‘gaming the engines’ is okay, as long as it’s for a cause YOU agree with with? Your ‘sidebar’ argument is pretty weak too. You’re advertising on a freely hosted blog.

    So, you advertise on your blog and you tried to game the engines from your blog, AND, you tried to enlist the help of others to help you game the engines. Is it hard to sit down at the keyboard with one foot in your mouth?

  66. DG: there’s a huge difference between me writing about gaming an engine (and being transparent about it) and me paying 1,000 bloggers to do it in a non-transparent way.

    Sad that you don’t see the difference.

    I guess you wouldn’t see the difference between a letterwriting campaign to politicians and going in and bribing them behind closed doors. Got it.

  67. DG: there’s a huge difference between me writing about gaming an engine (and being transparent about it) and me paying 1,000 bloggers to do it in a non-transparent way.

    Sad that you don’t see the difference.

    I guess you wouldn’t see the difference between a letterwriting campaign to politicians and going in and bribing them behind closed doors. Got it.

  68. I think you may be living in some sort of fantasy land where everything is free and people do not need money to survive.

    I own my own blog… pay the hosting and have on occasion done a review blog – while my time is paid for my opinions are not bought. So what that makes me a whore or a pimp – I think there are claims of both in the comments above. It would be nice to know if I am being fucked or getting someone fucked.

  69. I think you may be living in some sort of fantasy land where everything is free and people do not need money to survive.

    I own my own blog… pay the hosting and have on occasion done a review blog – while my time is paid for my opinions are not bought. So what that makes me a whore or a pimp – I think there are claims of both in the comments above. It would be nice to know if I am being fucked or getting someone fucked.

  70. I’m all for disclosure. What does that have to do with gaming the engines? The engines aren’t real fond of manipulation period. Paid links or not.

    And since we’re now using absurd illustrations to make an illogical point, let’s try this one;

    I don’t suppose you see the difference in publically asking 1,000 people to start a riot in the streets, or privately asking 1,000 people to start a riot in the streets.

  71. I’m all for disclosure. What does that have to do with gaming the engines? The engines aren’t real fond of manipulation period. Paid links or not.

    And since we’re now using absurd illustrations to make an illogical point, let’s try this one;

    I don’t suppose you see the difference in publically asking 1,000 people to start a riot in the streets, or privately asking 1,000 people to start a riot in the streets.

  72. Robert, just curious – do you see the recent market in Pay Per Post as really all that different from the promotions and product recommendations that A List bloggers traditionally post? I’m thinking of where there are clear direct and indirect commercial relations between themselves and the companies they promo.

    Also – isn’t the Pay Per Post system a more democratic economy – and one that will inevitably see market forces hone the process so that the biggest sell-outs in the short-term are the biggest losers in the long-term?

  73. Robert, just curious – do you see the recent market in Pay Per Post as really all that different from the promotions and product recommendations that A List bloggers traditionally post? I’m thinking of where there are clear direct and indirect commercial relations between themselves and the companies they promo.

    Also – isn’t the Pay Per Post system a more democratic economy – and one that will inevitably see market forces hone the process so that the biggest sell-outs in the short-term are the biggest losers in the long-term?

  74. I think it’s a good thing that WordPress doesn’t allow pay per post or other stuff. There are more then enough “spam” sites out there. One idea could be that WordPress starts to charge people who wants to use their site to stuff like that.

  75. I think it’s a good thing that WordPress doesn’t allow pay per post or other stuff. There are more then enough “spam” sites out there. One idea could be that WordPress starts to charge people who wants to use their site to stuff like that.

  76. I totally agree. There are far too many spam blog software tools out there that work especially good on free blogs. When someone pays for hosting it makes them think twice and they are usually more responsible.

    Check out my coaching program if you need one-on-one coaching at http://www.AskGregg.com

  77. I totally agree. There are far too many spam blog software tools out there that work especially good on free blogs. When someone pays for hosting it makes them think twice and they are usually more responsible.

    Check out my coaching program if you need one-on-one coaching at http://www.AskGregg.com

  78. Very True Anghus.
    I find that Search Engine Marketing is fast becoming THE way to getting tons of traffic. I mean, think about it: Search Engine Marketing is free (if done right) and it can bring you litterly thousands upon thousands of free quality traffic every week. I’ve decided that the safest bet for me is to work hard and get a #1 spot on all major search engines for a certain keyword – and once that is done… I’ll be set as far as traffic goes. Any comments?

  79. Very True Anghus.
    I find that Search Engine Marketing is fast becoming THE way to getting tons of traffic. I mean, think about it: Search Engine Marketing is free (if done right) and it can bring you litterly thousands upon thousands of free quality traffic every week. I’ve decided that the safest bet for me is to work hard and get a #1 spot on all major search engines for a certain keyword – and once that is done… I’ll be set as far as traffic goes. Any comments?

  80. I am using a mass blog creator which has template for adsense. It creates upto 70 blogs in an hour. However, thats not the point. Its very easy to manage, as you need 2-3 hot blogs and maybe 50-100 blogs to really get some good hits and earnings. For others with good content and traffic even one blog is ok.
    regards

  81. I am using a mass blog creator which has template for adsense. It creates upto 70 blogs in an hour. However, thats not the point. Its very easy to manage, as you need 2-3 hot blogs and maybe 50-100 blogs to really get some good hits and earnings. For others with good content and traffic even one blog is ok.
    regards

  82. The next generation seo software available for unprofessionals to become professional seo’s can be a breakthrough in the lives of many websit owners by not paying huge sums to professionals to get high rankings on major seatrch engines, that too for a little period of time because the search engines do change the algorithm of ranking and indexing the pages on thier respective engines by that giving a fair and filtered results to their searchers.
    On how to be a fair and search engine friendly check my next commentment soon..

  83. The next generation seo software available for unprofessionals to become professional seo’s can be a breakthrough in the lives of many websit owners by not paying huge sums to professionals to get high rankings on major seatrch engines, that too for a little period of time because the search engines do change the algorithm of ranking and indexing the pages on thier respective engines by that giving a fair and filtered results to their searchers.
    On how to be a fair and search engine friendly check my next commentment soon..

  84. I market one of the highest revenue sites in the industry, top RPM’s and maximum payouts? Got premium domains or a top portfolio and want 100% revenue share? Ready to sell, but interested in capitalizing on your portfolio’s future growth?

    Partner with us. We’ve got the only end-to-end domain services created by domainers, for domainers. Whether you choose to park, lease or sell, we’ll get you the revenue you deserve
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  85. I market one of the highest revenue sites in the industry, top RPM’s and maximum payouts? Got premium domains or a top portfolio and want 100% revenue share? Ready to sell, but interested in capitalizing on your portfolio’s future growth?

    Partner with us. We’ve got the only end-to-end domain services created by domainers, for domainers. Whether you choose to park, lease or sell, we’ll get you the revenue you deserve
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  86. Jayant Hudar – creating 70 blogs an hour? My god, that is going some…..surely this is majorly high maintenance to fill them with content or get links back? What are you using?

  87. Jayant Hudar – creating 70 blogs an hour? My god, that is going some…..surely this is majorly high maintenance to fill them with content or get links back? What are you using?

  88. I use WordPress, but I bought my own domain, and I host it myself. If I’m not willing to invest in my business, then why would anyone else?

    I admit it; I do have a Blogger blog, and at one time I used it to help me get my sites spidered. Found out I didn’t need it. Build a good site and promote it, it isn’t even an issue.

    WordPress.com isn’t a democracy. They don’t have to accept anything they don’t want. I personally delete comments that have nothing to do with my blog, I do have advertising on it, as well as affiliate programs, but I try not to go overboard so that others can read the message.

    Guess it all depends on what you want to use your blog for. Mine is a relationship builder and public relations tool for my business.

    Sincerely,

    Jinger Jarrett

  89. I use WordPress, but I bought my own domain, and I host it myself. If I’m not willing to invest in my business, then why would anyone else?

    I admit it; I do have a Blogger blog, and at one time I used it to help me get my sites spidered. Found out I didn’t need it. Build a good site and promote it, it isn’t even an issue.

    WordPress.com isn’t a democracy. They don’t have to accept anything they don’t want. I personally delete comments that have nothing to do with my blog, I do have advertising on it, as well as affiliate programs, but I try not to go overboard so that others can read the message.

    Guess it all depends on what you want to use your blog for. Mine is a relationship builder and public relations tool for my business.

    Sincerely,

    Jinger Jarrett

  90. Internet marketing seems more about blogs now than actual sales pages. The fact that wordpress don’t allow ads is quite irrelevant really, most users can crank out sales via their affiliate links, and not need the pittance that google pays now for adsense.

  91. Internet marketing seems more about blogs now than actual sales pages. The fact that wordpress don’t allow ads is quite irrelevant really, most users can crank out sales via their affiliate links, and not need the pittance that google pays now for adsense.

  92. One tool any affiliate should not be without is an affiliate link cloaker. Affiliate link cloakers will mask and disguise your affiliate links to help prevent affiliate link hijacking. Anyone who has done affiliate marketing before knows about this.

    There is a free service at http://www.urlfreeze.com that you can use to help fight against affiliate link hijacking. Hope that helps.

    Chris

  93. One tool any affiliate should not be without is an affiliate link cloaker. Affiliate link cloakers will mask and disguise your affiliate links to help prevent affiliate link hijacking. Anyone who has done affiliate marketing before knows about this.

    There is a free service at http://www.urlfreeze.com that you can use to help fight against affiliate link hijacking. Hope that helps.

    Chris

  94. wordpress is earning a lot of money from its bloggers why not let its bloggers earn as well? i mean, if they worry about spamming, couldn’t they make the rules less severe?

  95. wordpress is earning a lot of money from its bloggers why not let its bloggers earn as well? i mean, if they worry about spamming, couldn’t they make the rules less severe?

  96. I wish it wasn’t but Search Engine Optomization (SEO), is a part of a webmasters life. SEO is the daily battle to keep ahead of the search engines, especially Google. It is very much like a Salmon swimming upstream. Every 3 months Google changes everything in the way they do things as far a their search results go (SERP). That only means I have to throw out the window at least 1/3 of the things I was doing to get their attention. One thing that always works is back links from other web sites. Up at the top of the comment section here there is a place for your Name and Your Website. That is there in case people would like to go to see what you are all about. On any other web site that link would also count as a backlink if Google ever came over here and spotted it. Google insists that blogs have a word called “NOFOLLOW” in their code so it knows not to count that address as a back link. So I looked around and found a little piece of software that defeats the NOFOLLOW code under the Name. It is a Word Press Plug In that you install in your wp-content/plugin directory and just activate in your plug in admin site. Easy and fast. To get this for yourself just go to the web site under my name and look for the nofollow button and download and unzip the code. Have fun. Bob

  97. I wish it wasn’t but Search Engine Optomization (SEO), is a part of a webmasters life. SEO is the daily battle to keep ahead of the search engines, especially Google. It is very much like a Salmon swimming upstream. Every 3 months Google changes everything in the way they do things as far a their search results go (SERP). That only means I have to throw out the window at least 1/3 of the things I was doing to get their attention. One thing that always works is back links from other web sites. Up at the top of the comment section here there is a place for your Name and Your Website. That is there in case people would like to go to see what you are all about. On any other web site that link would also count as a backlink if Google ever came over here and spotted it. Google insists that blogs have a word called “NOFOLLOW” in their code so it knows not to count that address as a back link. So I looked around and found a little piece of software that defeats the NOFOLLOW code under the Name. It is a Word Press Plug In that you install in your wp-content/plugin directory and just activate in your plug in admin site. Easy and fast. To get this for yourself just go to the web site under my name and look for the nofollow button and download and unzip the code. Have fun. Bob

  98. See I’d be happy to move to a host but wordpress refuses to export my blog correctly. So I’m stuck not being able to put ads on my site but having enough traffic to make money.

    I wish WP would just offer an option to PAY for access on their servers so we can run ads on our sites. Why can’t I just pay them $6 a month instead of like bluehost?

  99. See I’d be happy to move to a host but wordpress refuses to export my blog correctly. So I’m stuck not being able to put ads on my site but having enough traffic to make money.

    I wish WP would just offer an option to PAY for access on their servers so we can run ads on our sites. Why can’t I just pay them $6 a month instead of like bluehost?

  100. Informational Products. Ebooks are the best source of informational products and Internet business owners use these for viral marketing purposes or to sell from their websites. However, they don’t have time to write these themselves so that is where you come in. You will act as a ghostwriter and won’t earn credit for the work, but it is a self-fulfilling achievement to know you had a part in the finished product. A standard ebook is generally about 50 pages long. You can write your own ebook and sell it online as well.
    http://www.skilline.com

  101. Informational Products. Ebooks are the best source of informational products and Internet business owners use these for viral marketing purposes or to sell from their websites. However, they don’t have time to write these themselves so that is where you come in. You will act as a ghostwriter and won’t earn credit for the work, but it is a self-fulfilling achievement to know you had a part in the finished product. A standard ebook is generally about 50 pages long. You can write your own ebook and sell it online as well.
    http://www.skilline.com

  102. Before an SEO can work with the site’s content, he/she must perform a detailed website keyword analysis. They need to determine what keywords a prospective customer could use to find the business online.

  103. Before an SEO can work with the site’s content, he/she must perform a detailed website keyword analysis. They need to determine what keywords a prospective customer could use to find the business online.

  104. Every SEO plan needs to have a dep understanding what is the scope.. from analyzing to monitoring and applying.. Those people need to understand what is SEO is..

  105. Every SEO plan needs to have a dep understanding what is the scope.. from analyzing to monitoring and applying.. Those people need to understand what is SEO is..

  106. I’m not surprised. PayPerPost is clogging WordPress’ databases with spam. I’ve written about PayPerPost and why it will kill any blog here. PayPerPost is definately something that should be avoided.

  107. I’m not surprised. PayPerPost is clogging WordPress’ databases with spam. I’ve written about PayPerPost and why it will kill any blog here. PayPerPost is definately something that should be avoided.

  108. I don’t think internet surfers are any different than folks watching TV. No one likes that ads and most of us have gone to some kind of recording device to allow us to fast forward through all the commercials when we watch out favorite shows. Ads are Ok as long as they are not obtrusive abd detract from what we want to do online.,,unless we are shopping of course. I don’t want to wade through a lot of stuff trying to sell me something…unless I was shopping. I applaud WP.

  109. I don’t think internet surfers are any different than folks watching TV. No one likes that ads and most of us have gone to some kind of recording device to allow us to fast forward through all the commercials when we watch out favorite shows. Ads are Ok as long as they are not obtrusive abd detract from what we want to do online.,,unless we are shopping of course. I don’t want to wade through a lot of stuff trying to sell me something…unless I was shopping. I applaud WP.