PodCamp email taken out of context…

Damn, I love when something I write in email gets taken out of context and put on blogs. Here’s such a context.

The PodCamp folks asked me if I wanted to come and speak at PodCamp.

I email back and ask them if they can cover any of my expenses in getting there. That’s what I always do. Why? Because most of the time conferences WILL cover expenses to bring in outside speakers.

It’s my responsibility to make PodTech make a profit. IT IS MY RESPONSIBILITY TO PUT AS FEW RESOURCE CONSTRAINTS ON MY BUSINESS AS POSSIBLE. And, yes, if there is money available to cover my expenses it IS MY RESPONSIBILITY TO ASK FOR THEM!

I didn’t ask for hotel money. I have friends in New York that I’ll stay with. In fact, I didn’t ask for anything in particular. I just asked if there were any expense funds available.

But, I guess this group just wants to embarrass me. They could have simply said “no” and then I would have had to decide whether or not it was a good investment for PodTech to be there (it probably is).

Instead they took a private email, which hadn’t yet reached a conclusion, and took it into public. Wow.

Future speakers watch out when dealing with this group.

UPDATE: since my words, said in private, have now been taken public, here’s the email string in full. Please note that I was perfectly willing to fund the trip, but that THEY OFFERED THE EXPENSES AND ADMITTED THEY HAD SPONSORS!!! Read my thread. I said “I take it there’s no budget to cover travel expenses, right?”

And, here’s the thread that is in public view where they were talking about the issue.

UPDATE: Jason Van Orden, in my comments, says that Rob Safuto was not involved in the planning and the committee that was planning this doesn’t agree with him. My view? Unfortunately when you have negotiations in public view, these kinds of problems happen. It is unprofessional to be treated this way, but the blame for that lies mostly at Rob’s feet. He should have reported the facts, rather than just attacked. I hate it when people attack without even calling, or trying to get the point of view of the person who is being attacked. There’s a reason my email address and phone number are on my blog.

143 thoughts on “PodCamp email taken out of context…

  1. Robert

    It is clear to all that you are right in this case!

    Also, taking Christopher Penn’s point
    “anyone who attends is welcome to speak”

    This is different to actually being invited to speak, as was the case with Robert. If there is invitation, Robert HAS the right to ask what are the conditions. No doubt about that.

    I would suggest Robert that you actually go to the conference, to show that you are above all of this. On the other hand, I understand if you don’t lose your time with these folks anymore!

    Antonio

  2. I tried to make a comment to that guy’s original post and it told me that he’s activated the “moderate” tool, so it didn’t post.

    How “open” is that??

  3. I tried to make a comment to that guy’s original post and it told me that he’s activated the “moderate” tool, so it didn’t post.

    How “open” is that??

  4. Oh.. and one other thing. A-listers do attract people to come. So paying their expenses is really not a bad thing. It’s a marketing gimmick to make sure people do come.

    Just be glad that people are asking for only expenses paid and not speaker fees. Speaker fees run anywhere between 10-20k a person. Would an unconference pay for this? Probably not. But if you’re hurting for people, and can raise the money, you’ll do anything to get your name out there.

  5. Oh.. and one other thing. A-listers do attract people to come. So paying their expenses is really not a bad thing. It’s a marketing gimmick to make sure people do come.

    Just be glad that people are asking for only expenses paid and not speaker fees. Speaker fees run anywhere between 10-20k a person. Would an unconference pay for this? Probably not. But if you’re hurting for people, and can raise the money, you’ll do anything to get your name out there.

  6. Very true. But like I said before: the whole “finance” part of it was misdirecting.

    The only difference between your conference and mine was the “unconference” part. That’s a planning difference, not a financial one. It’s still possible to gain sponsorships if you seek it from the right sources or what not.

    While it does mean that it equates everyone on the same level, sometimes many conferences require stepping up to pay some speakers to come. You probably don’t have that issue in NYC (and if you do, I don’t feel for you at all) but when trying to plan something in the South in a smaller city, it’s a whole other ballgame.

    Realistically, I know many people that I read that have a total edge on A-listers. More interesting, more in-depth. Especially political. Many just spark the conversation with a line or two.

    In any case, while the issue has been pretty much resolved, I think the lessons here to note is: 1) it costs money to run any type of conference, even an unconference. 2) If it ends in *Camp, there’s a pretty good chance it’s an unconference and thereby in that style.

  7. Very true. But like I said before: the whole “finance” part of it was misdirecting.

    The only difference between your conference and mine was the “unconference” part. That’s a planning difference, not a financial one. It’s still possible to gain sponsorships if you seek it from the right sources or what not.

    While it does mean that it equates everyone on the same level, sometimes many conferences require stepping up to pay some speakers to come. You probably don’t have that issue in NYC (and if you do, I don’t feel for you at all) but when trying to plan something in the South in a smaller city, it’s a whole other ballgame.

    Realistically, I know many people that I read that have a total edge on A-listers. More interesting, more in-depth. Especially political. Many just spark the conversation with a line or two.

    In any case, while the issue has been pretty much resolved, I think the lessons here to note is: 1) it costs money to run any type of conference, even an unconference. 2) If it ends in *Camp, there’s a pretty good chance it’s an unconference and thereby in that style.

  8. Christopher: not all speakers are equal. Some bring in sponsorships. Some have published books and have experiences that others haven’t. Some are, simply, better on stage (a point I’m being painfully reminded of as I sit through a boring presentation).

    But, I’ve learned my lesson. I won’t ask for fees from any unconference from now on. On the other hand, I probably won’t be able to attend many of those, either (it seems there’s an unconference every three days lately).

  9. Christopher: not all speakers are equal. Some bring in sponsorships. Some have published books and have experiences that others haven’t. Some are, simply, better on stage (a point I’m being painfully reminded of as I sit through a boring presentation).

    But, I’ve learned my lesson. I won’t ask for fees from any unconference from now on. On the other hand, I probably won’t be able to attend many of those, either (it seems there’s an unconference every three days lately).

  10. Darkmoon – it’s absolutely a legitimate question for ANYONE to ask. Would I love to pay everyone’s way to PodCamp Boston 2? Sure. Will that be likely? I doubt it, unless a major sponsor has lots of money that they have nothing better to do with.

    The whole goal of PodCamp is to bring an UnConference-style event to the communities that want it, and on those grounds, each PodCamp group and event is free to run with the event as they see fit as long as they meet the basics – no charge for attending, Creative Commons on all content, etc. Everyone is not only free to speak, but is encouraged to speak, making everyone a potential speaker.

    That said, should some speakers receive compensation when others do not? At PodCamp Boston 1, we had a fair share of “A-List” speakers, people like Mitch Joel, CC Chapman, Steve Garfield, and more. We also had people who’d never been heard of before who presented information that was just as valuable. To compensate some speakers without compensating others, to me, seems unfair, if the quality of information is reasonably equal.

    Despite this conversation starting roughly, I think it’s great that the issue of speakers, fees, money, and UnConferences is being held publicly, because it’s an important discussion. In my admittedly biased mind, it’s my feeling that at an UnConference, status should be checked at the door as much as possible.

  11. Darkmoon – it’s absolutely a legitimate question for ANYONE to ask. Would I love to pay everyone’s way to PodCamp Boston 2? Sure. Will that be likely? I doubt it, unless a major sponsor has lots of money that they have nothing better to do with.

    The whole goal of PodCamp is to bring an UnConference-style event to the communities that want it, and on those grounds, each PodCamp group and event is free to run with the event as they see fit as long as they meet the basics – no charge for attending, Creative Commons on all content, etc. Everyone is not only free to speak, but is encouraged to speak, making everyone a potential speaker.

    That said, should some speakers receive compensation when others do not? At PodCamp Boston 1, we had a fair share of “A-List” speakers, people like Mitch Joel, CC Chapman, Steve Garfield, and more. We also had people who’d never been heard of before who presented information that was just as valuable. To compensate some speakers without compensating others, to me, seems unfair, if the quality of information is reasonably equal.

    Despite this conversation starting roughly, I think it’s great that the issue of speakers, fees, money, and UnConferences is being held publicly, because it’s an important discussion. In my admittedly biased mind, it’s my feeling that at an UnConference, status should be checked at the door as much as possible.

  12. Heh. You’ve GOT to be joking. Legitimate question for speakers to ask.

    It’s interesting that they made the point about not being flush with cash. ConvergeSouth invited both Robert and Maryam, and we’re not “flush” with cash by any means either. We had two local foundations that supported us and some sponsors to help us with funding. It’s not the same as the “unconference” style, but it’s amusing that they make a point of the $1,995 per day thing.

    Mainly because we charged… well… absolutely nothing for CS.

    Either way, way to step up to the conversation, guys (the founders and planners of Podcamp). Hopefully this gets resolved soon without being too much trouble.

  13. Heh. You’ve GOT to be joking. Legitimate question for speakers to ask.

    It’s interesting that they made the point about not being flush with cash. ConvergeSouth invited both Robert and Maryam, and we’re not “flush” with cash by any means either. We had two local foundations that supported us and some sponsors to help us with funding. It’s not the same as the “unconference” style, but it’s amusing that they make a point of the $1,995 per day thing.

    Mainly because we charged… well… absolutely nothing for CS.

    Either way, way to step up to the conversation, guys (the founders and planners of Podcamp). Hopefully this gets resolved soon without being too much trouble.

  14. I’m helping to put together PodcampNYC, and I’d like to do my best to clarify things a little, if possible, and publicly apologize to Robert on behalf of the group.

    Podcamp is just like Barcamp in that each city has its own team of organizers who are inspired by the spirit of the event, but are mostly separate from the original group. There is no national organizing structure, although Chris Brogan and Chris Penn have been nice enough to lend us their time and advice as we have gone along.

    This mistake (and I’m the guy who made the google group public, so I get a big share of the blame here) was ours alone, and should not reflect on other or future Podcamps.

    Robert, I’m incredibly sorry for what happened to you here. I hope reading our email thread at least assured you that none of the people planning the event held any ill will towards you for asking. We understood why it was done and were having an open discussion about whether covering expenses any speaker at all was the best use of the community’s resources. I agree that your name should have been left out of the public discussion, but the general consensus seemed to be that we would have loved to have you there if we could make it happen.

    It’s unfortunate that Rob Safuto chose to make a public stink about this. He has not been active in planning, nor has he supported us in any way other than linking from his blog.

    As a lesson to future Podcamp or Barcamp planners, create two clearly labeled mailing lists – one public and one “mostly private” – that way things said privately have less chance of being taken out of context, and everyone is more aware of the fact that they’re speaking in a public forum.

    Apologies
    -Eric

  15. I’m helping to put together PodcampNYC, and I’d like to do my best to clarify things a little, if possible, and publicly apologize to Robert on behalf of the group.

    Podcamp is just like Barcamp in that each city has its own team of organizers who are inspired by the spirit of the event, but are mostly separate from the original group. There is no national organizing structure, although Chris Brogan and Chris Penn have been nice enough to lend us their time and advice as we have gone along.

    This mistake (and I’m the guy who made the google group public, so I get a big share of the blame here) was ours alone, and should not reflect on other or future Podcamps.

    Robert, I’m incredibly sorry for what happened to you here. I hope reading our email thread at least assured you that none of the people planning the event held any ill will towards you for asking. We understood why it was done and were having an open discussion about whether covering expenses any speaker at all was the best use of the community’s resources. I agree that your name should have been left out of the public discussion, but the general consensus seemed to be that we would have loved to have you there if we could make it happen.

    It’s unfortunate that Rob Safuto chose to make a public stink about this. He has not been active in planning, nor has he supported us in any way other than linking from his blog.

    As a lesson to future Podcamp or Barcamp planners, create two clearly labeled mailing lists – one public and one “mostly private” – that way things said privately have less chance of being taken out of context, and everyone is more aware of the fact that they’re speaking in a public forum.

    Apologies
    -Eric

  16. Very good opportunity to remember two things,

    1. Privacy statement on the bottom of your email as this is not the same under any circumstance as having put this under commons license

    2. You never know where anything put in an email will go, good or bad.

    This sadly reflects badly on the Podcamp group just as the HP issues reflect poorly on HP.

  17. Very good opportunity to remember two things,

    1. Privacy statement on the bottom of your email as this is not the same under any circumstance as having put this under commons license

    2. You never know where anything put in an email will go, good or bad.

    This sadly reflects badly on the Podcamp group just as the HP issues reflect poorly on HP.

  18. Christopher Penn, other co-Founder of PodCamp here. I’d like to clear up one very important point. The person who posted this on their blog IS NOT an organizer of PodCamp NYC, and his views should NOT be construed to be representative of anything the PodCamp NYC has to say.

    Here’s their official site:

    http://podcampnyc.pbwiki.com/

    Generally speaking, at xCamp events like PodCamp and BarCamp, anyone who attends is welcome to speak, and in lieu of speakers receiving compensation, everyone attends for free instead of paying $1,995 per day like a regular conference.

    The real reason that speakers aren’t paid is that xCamps are generally affairs put on by their communities, and these affairs are NOT flush with cash. You’re welcome to inspect the books of PodCamp Boston. We’ve disclosed every penny taken in and spent, and we encourage other xCamps to do the same.

    http://podcamp.pbwiki.com/BostonLedger

    Is Robert Scoble worth an honorarium and travel expenses? Of course. He’s a valued member of the new media community.

    BUT SO ARE YOU. Yes, you. The person reading this comment. Your participation in new media is just as important as Robert’s, because without our respective communities, we’re all just talking to computers. If an xCamp some day comes into a billion dollars of cash that someone just wanted to give away, absolutely we’ll pay Robert’s travel expenses and an honorarium – but you’ll get one too, because you ARE the new media.

  19. Christopher Penn, other co-Founder of PodCamp here. I’d like to clear up one very important point. The person who posted this on their blog IS NOT an organizer of PodCamp NYC, and his views should NOT be construed to be representative of anything the PodCamp NYC has to say.

    Here’s their official site:

    http://podcampnyc.pbwiki.com/

    Generally speaking, at xCamp events like PodCamp and BarCamp, anyone who attends is welcome to speak, and in lieu of speakers receiving compensation, everyone attends for free instead of paying $1,995 per day like a regular conference.

    The real reason that speakers aren’t paid is that xCamps are generally affairs put on by their communities, and these affairs are NOT flush with cash. You’re welcome to inspect the books of PodCamp Boston. We’ve disclosed every penny taken in and spent, and we encourage other xCamps to do the same.

    http://podcamp.pbwiki.com/BostonLedger

    Is Robert Scoble worth an honorarium and travel expenses? Of course. He’s a valued member of the new media community.

    BUT SO ARE YOU. Yes, you. The person reading this comment. Your participation in new media is just as important as Robert’s, because without our respective communities, we’re all just talking to computers. If an xCamp some day comes into a billion dollars of cash that someone just wanted to give away, absolutely we’ll pay Robert’s travel expenses and an honorarium – but you’ll get one too, because you ARE the new media.

  20. You asked if travel expenses were covered and that was enough to get them upset? That’s a joke! You weren’t asking for a $5,000 honorarium – which, by the way, would be okay too. You were asking about travel expenses.

    I speak for organizations all the time. I’ll speak for free. I’ll bend my schedule to do so – I’ll even fly up and back the same day if possible to reduce expenses. I’ll stay at very inexpensive hotels (as long as they have Internet and I don’t have to share a bathroom).

    But I won’t pay my own travel expenses. That is ludicrious. This isn’t about the mechanisms of big business versus the small independents. It is a courtesy to presenters to cover their expenses and it is a courtesy by presenters to speak for no honorarium or fee.

    Time is everyone’s most valuable commodity and everyone is trading both during such events.

  21. You asked if travel expenses were covered and that was enough to get them upset? That’s a joke! You weren’t asking for a $5,000 honorarium – which, by the way, would be okay too. You were asking about travel expenses.

    I speak for organizations all the time. I’ll speak for free. I’ll bend my schedule to do so – I’ll even fly up and back the same day if possible to reduce expenses. I’ll stay at very inexpensive hotels (as long as they have Internet and I don’t have to share a bathroom).

    But I won’t pay my own travel expenses. That is ludicrious. This isn’t about the mechanisms of big business versus the small independents. It is a courtesy to presenters to cover their expenses and it is a courtesy by presenters to speak for no honorarium or fee.

    Time is everyone’s most valuable commodity and everyone is trading both during such events.

  22. Hello from one of the co-Founders of PodCamp. It was unfortunate to wake to this being the first email in my box. I was excited to see Robert Scoble’s name in my inbox, but not after I read what had happened.

    PodCamp is not unlike BarCamp in that it’s an idea that can be executed by anyone who chooses to organize the event in a location of their choosing. We have very few rules (people can’t be made to pay to attend; a single organization can’t run the event, for fear of it being a commercial pitch in disguise, a few more). Other than that, it’s anyone’s to operate.

    I have sent an email apologizing to Robert on behalf of PodCamp as an entity, and I have communicated what I understand to be the conversation. I have requested the keeper of the NYC blog take down the post.

    I’m glad to talk further with anyone who wants more information.

    –Chris Brogan…
    co-Founder, PodCamp

  23. Hello from one of the co-Founders of PodCamp. It was unfortunate to wake to this being the first email in my box. I was excited to see Robert Scoble’s name in my inbox, but not after I read what had happened.

    PodCamp is not unlike BarCamp in that it’s an idea that can be executed by anyone who chooses to organize the event in a location of their choosing. We have very few rules (people can’t be made to pay to attend; a single organization can’t run the event, for fear of it being a commercial pitch in disguise, a few more). Other than that, it’s anyone’s to operate.

    I have sent an email apologizing to Robert on behalf of PodCamp as an entity, and I have communicated what I understand to be the conversation. I have requested the keeper of the NYC blog take down the post.

    I’m glad to talk further with anyone who wants more information.

    –Chris Brogan…
    co-Founder, PodCamp

  24. Be back to cover how to get a video bio done. Robert, we’ll disclosure the entire process of making a video bio. Our group promote technology and education. This will serve our mission.

    You can start writing your bio script. l’ll help you polish it from Marketing and PR angles. You can post it on your wiki so that I can edit and allow anyone to see it.

    We’ll do it step by step.

    Now I’ll have to get my beauty sleep.

  25. Be back to cover how to get a video bio done. Robert, we’ll disclosure the entire process of making a video bio. Our group promote technology and education. This will serve our mission.

    You can start writing your bio script. l’ll help you polish it from Marketing and PR angles. You can post it on your wiki so that I can edit and allow anyone to see it.

    We’ll do it step by step.

    Now I’ll have to get my beauty sleep.

  26. (Reposting comment to main thread)
    Robert,

    I’m all for rallying against THE MAN, but “>> I take it there’s no budget to cover travel expenses, right?” and “> I’ll try to get you an answer within the next week. I was at the Podcamp in SF and it was pretty good!” becoming “Scoble to PodCamp NYC, ‘Pay Me!’” is pretty crazy.

  27. (Reposting comment to main thread)
    Robert,

    I’m all for rallying against THE MAN, but “>> I take it there’s no budget to cover travel expenses, right?” and “> I’ll try to get you an answer within the next week. I was at the Podcamp in SF and it was pretty good!” becoming “Scoble to PodCamp NYC, ‘Pay Me!’” is pretty crazy.

  28. Robert

    I’m planning to rewrite your bio from your wikipedia for press release. (Look guys, this is to show how we treat our speakers. Our last event on wiki I pull enough strength to get our speakers covered on national newspapers, press release, expose wiki to Asia market) I certainly don’t have to work so hard but I care for our speakers as they care for me.

    I thought may be I help you with a video bio instead of a written one since you are in video business. Have you seen any video bio on wikipedia? And we can post your video bio on your wiki and link to your blog.

    How many PR firms or organizers offer to help on bio? Not very often.

    NYC guys, SV have a lot of nice and smart professionals. Be more respectful to SV!

  29. Robert

    I’m planning to rewrite your bio from your wikipedia for press release. (Look guys, this is to show how we treat our speakers. Our last event on wiki I pull enough strength to get our speakers covered on national newspapers, press release, expose wiki to Asia market) I certainly don’t have to work so hard but I care for our speakers as they care for me.

    I thought may be I help you with a video bio instead of a written one since you are in video business. Have you seen any video bio on wikipedia? And we can post your video bio on your wiki and link to your blog.

    How many PR firms or organizers offer to help on bio? Not very often.

    NYC guys, SV have a lot of nice and smart professionals. Be more respectful to SV!

  30. Robert,

    You are right. You didn’t deserve to have this happen.

    I’m not the one who started the Google discussion group (or posted the info to it), but I’m sure it was an honest mistake/oversight and done in the “open spirit” of Podcamp. But this situation brings to light the weaknesses in that kind of process.

    In hindsight it’s clear that a private forum would have been more appropriate for the discussion.

    I’ve learned something from all of this. We’ll definitely take it to heart moving forward.

  31. Robert,

    You are right. You didn’t deserve to have this happen.

    I’m not the one who started the Google discussion group (or posted the info to it), but I’m sure it was an honest mistake/oversight and done in the “open spirit” of Podcamp. But this situation brings to light the weaknesses in that kind of process.

    In hindsight it’s clear that a private forum would have been more appropriate for the discussion.

    I’ve learned something from all of this. We’ll definitely take it to heart moving forward.

  32. Sorry I have to break here as I am posting from sidekick laying from my bed. I suppose to be a good girl resting on bed to recover from my cold and overtime work.

    In short, organizers should treat speakers nicely because they are taking their valuable time to prepare, travel and attend the events as contributors.

    Can’t those NYC folks get it?

  33. Sorry I have to break here as I am posting from sidekick laying from my bed. I suppose to be a good girl resting on bed to recover from my cold and overtime work.

    In short, organizers should treat speakers nicely because they are taking their valuable time to prepare, travel and attend the events as contributors.

    Can’t those NYC folks get it?

  34. Any time I see private email published on a blog I cringe, particularly when it’s clear there was no permission granted for that email to be published.

    In a world with so many things to really get angry about, it seems a little out of proportion to me for someone to get angry because you dared to ask if there was expense reimbursement for travel. That person’s time could have been better spent being angry about the number of talented young people dying in Iraq, or high gas prices or something.

    Sometimes this world of tech collapses on itself and loses perspective. This is one of those times. It looks like Mr. Safuto needs a reality check about what’s really important.

    -DnW

  35. Any time I see private email published on a blog I cringe, particularly when it’s clear there was no permission granted for that email to be published.

    In a world with so many things to really get angry about, it seems a little out of proportion to me for someone to get angry because you dared to ask if there was expense reimbursement for travel. That person’s time could have been better spent being angry about the number of talented young people dying in Iraq, or high gas prices or something.

    Sometimes this world of tech collapses on itself and loses perspective. This is one of those times. It looks like Mr. Safuto needs a reality check about what’s really important.

    -DnW

  36. Jason doesn’t explain how Rob came across the emails. Were they posted to the Google Group? How many people does it take to invite someone to speak? At Podcamp it takes a village! Maybe the planner should be more careful about what they post the Google Group.

  37. Jason doesn’t explain how Rob came across the emails. Were they posted to the Google Group? How many people does it take to invite someone to speak? At Podcamp it takes a village! Maybe the planner should be more careful about what they post the Google Group.

  38. Bess: it sounds like the conference planning committee wasn’t involved, but that Rob decided to attack me on his own without getting my point of view (nor getting the point of view of the conference planners).

  39. Bess: it sounds like the conference planning committee wasn’t involved, but that Rob decided to attack me on his own without getting my point of view (nor getting the point of view of the conference planners).

  40. Robert
    They are being mean. This is not nice. They should be more thankful to invite speaker. I say many ‘thank you’ to our speakers and volunteers before and after the events. I make sure our speakers enjoy their time and get fair amount of recognization and exposure. Seriously I have established speakers from UK willing to travel to US to speak at our gig, not even a conference.

  41. Robert
    They are being mean. This is not nice. They should be more thankful to invite speaker. I say many ‘thank you’ to our speakers and volunteers before and after the events. I make sure our speakers enjoy their time and get fair amount of recognization and exposure. Seriously I have established speakers from UK willing to travel to US to speak at our gig, not even a conference.

  42. Jason: in the future I’d recommend keeping conference planning groups off of the public Web so that things like this in the future don’t happen — it really is totally unprofessional to be treated this way. Unfortunately when you make planning groups public you make everyone a conference planner, or think they have some right to misconstrue what is happening. Thanks for making that clear.

  43. Jason: in the future I’d recommend keeping conference planning groups off of the public Web so that things like this in the future don’t happen — it really is totally unprofessional to be treated this way. Unfortunately when you make planning groups public you make everyone a conference planner, or think they have some right to misconstrue what is happening. Thanks for making that clear.

  44. I’d like to comment on this matter as someone who has had involvement with organizing PodcampNYC. I completely understand why Robert asked about travel costs.

    I’m not sure why Rob Safuto decided to make an issue of the matter on his blog, but it was an unfortunate decision.

    Rob Safuto has not been involved with any of the planning calls, emails, or group threads. He’s registered to attend and that’s it. Apparently he came across or has been reading the Google Group. He does not speak for PodcampNYC. His site, PodcastNYC, is not affiliated.

    Robert, I think those planning the event have nothing but good will towards you…whether or not the decision would be made to fly you in to speak.

  45. I’d like to comment on this matter as someone who has had involvement with organizing PodcampNYC. I completely understand why Robert asked about travel costs.

    I’m not sure why Rob Safuto decided to make an issue of the matter on his blog, but it was an unfortunate decision.

    Rob Safuto has not been involved with any of the planning calls, emails, or group threads. He’s registered to attend and that’s it. Apparently he came across or has been reading the Google Group. He does not speak for PodcampNYC. His site, PodcastNYC, is not affiliated.

    Robert, I think those planning the event have nothing but good will towards you…whether or not the decision would be made to fly you in to speak.

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