Matt Cutts wins my “corporate blog of the week” award for Google

I should have a corporate blog of the week. I don’t. But if I did, this post by Matt Cutts (he heads the webspam team for Google) would win it. He explains why Google kicked a site out of their index and gives Google’s side of the story clearly, simply, and engagingly.

In other news, Rex Sorgatz (thanks to Anil) has a list of great blogs that you probably aren’t reading. Hey, where’s the OPML file?

Comments

  1. There are always too sides of the story and with the net you have a chance at giving yours. Usually it is not the big company but the other side who can set the record straight through the net (i just had such an incident myself).

    But I absolutly love what Matt has done here: yes it is one incident but it actually gives a lot of information around it and helps understand what happens.

    What he does not mention so heavily: We tend to forget how huge the data base of google (and others) is and with how many different information they need to make decisions in an automated way.

    A feedback loop like described with the webmaster tool is necessary. Where is my webmaster link for Yahoo, MSN and co? :o)

  2. There are always too sides of the story and with the net you have a chance at giving yours. Usually it is not the big company but the other side who can set the record straight through the net (i just had such an incident myself).

    But I absolutly love what Matt has done here: yes it is one incident but it actually gives a lot of information around it and helps understand what happens.

    What he does not mention so heavily: We tend to forget how huge the data base of google (and others) is and with how many different information they need to make decisions in an automated way.

    A feedback loop like described with the webmaster tool is necessary. Where is my webmaster link for Yahoo, MSN and co? :o)

  3. The real crime – besides the Hacking – is the fact that even when their algos indicate the liklihood that a Webpage has been a victim of hacking – Google takes down the Entire site. Thereby, depriving the webmaster of valid traffic for his other relevant pages.

    It takes time to get them back into the index, depending the circumstances, the income lost could be quite significant. More than it would be – if just only the hacked pages were eliminated from the SERPs

  4. The real crime – besides the Hacking – is the fact that even when their algos indicate the liklihood that a Webpage has been a victim of hacking – Google takes down the Entire site. Thereby, depriving the webmaster of valid traffic for his other relevant pages.

    It takes time to get them back into the index, depending the circumstances, the income lost could be quite significant. More than it would be – if just only the hacked pages were eliminated from the SERPs

  5. Novell likes Microsoft Open XML — shock!

    Format this! It’s IT Blogwatch, in which Novell irritates open source fans by supporting Microsoft’s Open XML format. Not to mention some amazing flame fractals…