Building Stonehenge? Interesting video on YouTube

While doing my link blog this morning and reading my feeds, I saw over on Michael Murphy’s blog I saw this video about how a guy finds innovative ways to move heavy blocks. I love videos like this.

Also on my link blog you’ll see some nice coffee designs and read why Frank Barnako is calling blog search engine Technorati “Technocrapi.”

Comments

  1. I helped a friend in Blackmountain North Carolina build a Stonehenge using similar techniques; it’s aliened with the winter and summer solstice and the equinoxes as well.

    Glad to see you read Mick Murphy he’s an amazing larger then life guy.

  2. I helped a friend in Blackmountain North Carolina build a Stonehenge using similar techniques; it’s aliened with the winter and summer solstice and the equinoxes as well.

    Glad to see you read Mick Murphy he’s an amazing larger then life guy.

  3. That is what I call leveraging an old technology.
    Give me a place to stand …

    Check out stone balancing via Google oogle too.

  4. That is what I call leveraging an old technology.
    Give me a place to stand …

    Check out stone balancing via Google oogle too.

  5. Bob Walsh, author of “MicroISV from Vision to Reality” showed part of this video during his keynote address to the European Shareware Conference (http://www.microisv.eu) last month in Cambridge.

    The geek community loved it!

    I subsequently visited Stonehenge later in November and couldn’t help thinking about small rock bearings and great holes dug in the ground as I marvelled at the size, weight and age of the stones.

  6. Bob Walsh, author of “MicroISV from Vision to Reality” showed part of this video during his keynote address to the European Shareware Conference (http://www.microisv.eu) last month in Cambridge.

    The geek community loved it!

    I subsequently visited Stonehenge later in November and couldn’t help thinking about small rock bearings and great holes dug in the ground as I marvelled at the size, weight and age of the stones.

  7. Impressive indeed, but I wonder about his theory about putting small rocks underneath the stones and then spinning them to move them. This would only work if the ground underneath was solid. That seems implausible at Stonehenge.

  8. Impressive indeed, but I wonder about his theory about putting small rocks underneath the stones and then spinning them to move them. This would only work if the ground underneath was solid. That seems implausible at Stonehenge.

  9. The link to Michael Murphy’s blog in your post, points to the same video (at Youtube) as the “this video” link. I’m guessing target was supposed to be http://blogs.technet.com/mjmurphy/archive/2006/12/06/who-says-science-isn-t-fun.aspx where Michael J. Murphy has a webLog.

    Other than that, what Wally T Wallington actually is acheiving is very impressing. Some background info and a few images from the process are availible at his site (http://www.theforgottentechnology.com/)…

  10. The link to Michael Murphy’s blog in your post, points to the same video (at Youtube) as the “this video” link. I’m guessing target was supposed to be http://blogs.technet.com/mjmurphy/archive/2006/12/06/who-says-science-isn-t-fun.aspx where Michael J. Murphy has a webLog.

    Other than that, what Wally T Wallington actually is acheiving is very impressing. Some background info and a few images from the process are availible at his site (http://www.theforgottentechnology.com/)…