A positive view of Le Web

It’s important to present a balanced view of things. I guess that’s the journalist training. If you are hearing strong emotions going one way, try to find out the other side of the story. I don’t always do that and when I don’t, and I really am honest with myself, and go back and look at it later, my audience is always underserved. So, I’ve been looking for a positive view of Le Web. Hugh Macleod gave one. Thanks Hugh. That brings back memories of last year’s Le Blog conference.

Personally I agree with Hugh. The time for blogging conferences to end is here. I’m getting tired of them. Why? I rarely learn something new.

But there is something in the air. Spending a few hours at Google got me excited again. I’m playing with a Blogger blog just to play around away from public view.

I am playing with JavaScript and all the latest gadgets and gidgets and widgets and code (Mark Lucovsky hates calling them anything but code, by the way, cause he says looking at it any other way starts to limit your thinking. He pointed out that most gadgets on blogs are rectangular. He asked me “why do they need to do that?” Then he showed me lots of examples where code sprayed results into the page in a totally non-rectangular way. And the stuff he demoed on maps is cool. I’ll get that video up for Christmas so we can all spend Christmas break copying JavaScripts from each other and playing around.

I want to go to a conference that Mark Lucovsky plans. One where he just shows me tip after tip of things I could do on my blog with code.

Why is JavaScript interesting to me? Because I can go to a site like Google’s Code site, check out the samples, have it generate code for me, and copy and paste that code into my blog’s template.

If I start to get more advanced, I can even built a little gadget for Windows Vista’s sidebar. Or, build a gadget for inclusion in Goowy, Pageflakes, Live.com, MyYahoo, or a raft of other gadget hosts.

I’m seeing a TON of innovation hitting in this space. Even Microsoft, who is seen as behind in the Internet space, has something like 470 gadgets, most of which were created by folks in the community.

The recent Gadget conference planned by Niall Kennedy sold out, without much PR or marketing.

So, maybe it’s time for “Blogging 2007 Style.” Hint: it ain’t your standard old blog anymore.

85 thoughts on “A positive view of Le Web

  1. Robert: That’s great :)

    I’m in Boston attending (crap loads) of W3C meetings end of January. So perhaps it would make sense to try hook up then if you’re around? I’ve never been to San Francisco so perhaps you could show me a few pubs and introduce me to a couple of mates!! I know, it’s a sin that I haven’t seen the place.

    I’ve been introduced to a VC by email this week, I think he’s based around your part of town – so it could be really good timing…

  2. Robert: That’s great :)

    I’m in Boston attending (crap loads) of W3C meetings end of January. So perhaps it would make sense to try hook up then if you’re around? I’ve never been to San Francisco so perhaps you could show me a few pubs and introduce me to a couple of mates!! I know, it’s a sin that I haven’t seen the place.

    I’ve been introduced to a VC by email this week, I think he’s based around your part of town – so it could be really good timing…

  3. Paul: I still would love to talk with you. Sorry I couldn’t hook up when I was in London. If you’re ever in San Francisco, look me up!

    I’ll be at LIFT in February, so maybe you could get there and we could do an interview then?

  4. Paul: I still would love to talk with you. Sorry I couldn’t hook up when I was in London. If you’re ever in San Francisco, look me up!

    I’ll be at LIFT in February, so maybe you could get there and we could do an interview then?

  5. Tom: I can’t disagree with anything you say  The only positive posts I’ve read seem to come from people who didn’t attend the even and therefore, didn’t actually witness the unprecedented disappointment throughout the entire audience.

    My only regret over the past few weeks is not being able to show up for an interview with Robert in London while he was over – I’m hoping he’s still friend’s with Sam and therefore respects his recommendation to talk to me ;-)

    BTW I met Sam and Daniel Appelquist for breakfast (Marc Canter cancelled) in London yesterday (Friday). “Time to turn the page” is the message of the day. It’s time to move on and put all of this behind us. New brand identity next week…

    We all agreed that it’s about ‘people’ and not the name of a URI. Take this blog for example, it would hardly retain the same level of readership if Robert decided to leave and allow someone else to take over?! TechCrunch was a good brand to use over here (Europe) but we don’t think it’ll make much difference when a new brand is created.

    Regarding the “ethics post” (thanks!) – a code of conduct for blogs is something I asked a few people about prior to all of this (Sam and Tom Raftery to name a few). I’m creating contentlabel.org which will enable industry to create codes of conduct using Content Labels, to help enable trust on the Web. I’ll happily post more about this if asked but I didn’t want to hijack the thread with my ideas… it would be perfect to get some more qualified/respect bloggers involved (I apologise if I’ve taken this off topic already Robert!)

    Reference:
    http://www.web2ireland.org/

  6. Tom: I can’t disagree with anything you say  The only positive posts I’ve read seem to come from people who didn’t attend the even and therefore, didn’t actually witness the unprecedented disappointment throughout the entire audience.

    My only regret over the past few weeks is not being able to show up for an interview with Robert in London while he was over – I’m hoping he’s still friend’s with Sam and therefore respects his recommendation to talk to me ;-)

    BTW I met Sam and Daniel Appelquist for breakfast (Marc Canter cancelled) in London yesterday (Friday). “Time to turn the page” is the message of the day. It’s time to move on and put all of this behind us. New brand identity next week…

    We all agreed that it’s about ‘people’ and not the name of a URI. Take this blog for example, it would hardly retain the same level of readership if Robert decided to leave and allow someone else to take over?! TechCrunch was a good brand to use over here (Europe) but we don’t think it’ll make much difference when a new brand is created.

    Regarding the “ethics post” (thanks!) – a code of conduct for blogs is something I asked a few people about prior to all of this (Sam and Tom Raftery to name a few). I’m creating contentlabel.org which will enable industry to create codes of conduct using Content Labels, to help enable trust on the Web. I’ll happily post more about this if asked but I didn’t want to hijack the thread with my ideas… it would be perfect to get some more qualified/respect bloggers involved (I apologise if I’ve taken this off topic already Robert!)

    Reference:
    http://www.web2ireland.org/

  7. I have to agree with a couple others comments and say most blogging conferences aren’t made for you Robert. In fact they are made so non techy people can learn from guys like you.

    I certainly learned a lot from your talks at the Blog Business Summit. Some sessions were over my head and way over the heads of other attendees.

    It is a common problem with seminars, where attendee expectations are not in line with the goals of the organizer. Or they sessions are simply not described or targeted adequately. Sometimes speakers go off on a tangent and completely ignore the original topic of the talk, sometimes a member or members of the audience take over and derail the session (sound familiar) and a lot of people in the room are feeling cheated.

    The best a conference organizer can do is pick good speakers and moderators, define the goals of the event clearly, market to the right group of attendees, describe the content of the sessions clearly, and target them to the level of expertise in the room.

    Most conferences have a mix of attendees with varying levels of expertise and interests. Ideally breaking your sessions down into entry level, mid level (the toughest to get right) and expert is the best way I have found to make sure everyone gets something out of the meeting.

    I wasn’t at le web don’t know anything about le web but having been involved with several of the largest trade events in North America I can say that changing your conference schedule 10 minutes before they start is a rookie mistake.

    Again not knowing much about le web in his defense politicians can be quite difficult to deal with, and tying in with your post today many people get star struck and caught up in the moment. The proper response to politicians demanding to re-organize the schedule should have been thanks but no thanks.

  8. I have to agree with a couple others comments and say most blogging conferences aren’t made for you Robert. In fact they are made so non techy people can learn from guys like you.

    I certainly learned a lot from your talks at the Blog Business Summit. Some sessions were over my head and way over the heads of other attendees.

    It is a common problem with seminars, where attendee expectations are not in line with the goals of the organizer. Or they sessions are simply not described or targeted adequately. Sometimes speakers go off on a tangent and completely ignore the original topic of the talk, sometimes a member or members of the audience take over and derail the session (sound familiar) and a lot of people in the room are feeling cheated.

    The best a conference organizer can do is pick good speakers and moderators, define the goals of the event clearly, market to the right group of attendees, describe the content of the sessions clearly, and target them to the level of expertise in the room.

    Most conferences have a mix of attendees with varying levels of expertise and interests. Ideally breaking your sessions down into entry level, mid level (the toughest to get right) and expert is the best way I have found to make sure everyone gets something out of the meeting.

    I wasn’t at le web don’t know anything about le web but having been involved with several of the largest trade events in North America I can say that changing your conference schedule 10 minutes before they start is a rookie mistake.

    Again not knowing much about le web in his defense politicians can be quite difficult to deal with, and tying in with your post today many people get star struck and caught up in the moment. The proper response to politicians demanding to re-organize the schedule should have been thanks but no thanks.

  9. I have to agree with a couple others comments and say most blogging conferences aren’t made for you Robert. In fact they are made so non techy people can learn from guys like you.

    I certainly learned a lot from your talks at the Blog Business Summit. Some sessions were over my head and way over the heads of other attendees.

    It is a common problem with seminars, where attendee expectations are not in line with the goals of the organizer. Or they sessions are simply not described or targeted adequately. Sometimes speakers go off on a tangent and completely ignore the original topic of the talk, sometimes a member or members of the audience take over and derail the session (sound familiar) and a lot of people in the room are feeling cheated.

    The best a conference organizer can do is pick good speakers and moderators, define the goals of the event clearly, market to the right group of attendees, describe the content of the sessions clearly, and target them to the level of expertise in the room.

    Most conferences have a mix of attendees with varying levels of expertise and interests. Ideally breaking your sessions down into entry level, mid level (the toughest to get right) and expert is the best way I have found to make sure everyone gets something out of the meeting.

    I wasn’t at le web don’t know anything about le web but having been involved with several of the largest trade events in North America I can say that changing your conference schedule 10 minutes before they start is a rookie mistake.

    Again not knowing much about le web in his defense politicians can be quite difficult to deal with, and tying in with your post today many people get star struck and caught up in the moment. The proper response to politicians demanding to re-organize the schedule should have been thanks but no thanks.

  10. Paul: “Yet to read the blogs you would think the Geneva Convention had been violated.”

    I know it seems like an over-reaction – but there was a lot of resentment in the room. As one of the ring-leaders among the dissenters, I chose to start posting because I was pissed off that our side of the story wouldn’t be heard. Me, Nicole Simon and Adam Tinworth were blogging away with a dissenting voice because if we didn’t, then I don’t think anyone would have paid any attention to the Sarkozy thing.

    And I’m certainly not going to stop until Loic Le Meur says something. This is a conversational media, yet the organisers of Le Web have had only one reaction – calling Sam Sethi an asshole. We want a conversation about this because we believe in the power of the technology which we are using and/or building.

    Lame conferences where political buddy games are played do not help to promote blogging and conversational media – they are stifled and dull. Europe – and France in particular – deserves better than Le Web. Did we overreact? Yes. But it was necessary so that someone might pay some attention to it. I don’t regret anything I’ve said. All I want to happen is for Loic to talk to us as a human being. Press desks, panels filled with sponsors (sorry, but how does Orange have anything to do with Web 2.0?), ministers shipped in to give stump speeches – none of that is in any way connected to having a conversation.

  11. Paul: “Yet to read the blogs you would think the Geneva Convention had been violated.”

    I know it seems like an over-reaction – but there was a lot of resentment in the room. As one of the ring-leaders among the dissenters, I chose to start posting because I was pissed off that our side of the story wouldn’t be heard. Me, Nicole Simon and Adam Tinworth were blogging away with a dissenting voice because if we didn’t, then I don’t think anyone would have paid any attention to the Sarkozy thing.

    And I’m certainly not going to stop until Loic Le Meur says something. This is a conversational media, yet the organisers of Le Web have had only one reaction – calling Sam Sethi an asshole. We want a conversation about this because we believe in the power of the technology which we are using and/or building.

    Lame conferences where political buddy games are played do not help to promote blogging and conversational media – they are stifled and dull. Europe – and France in particular – deserves better than Le Web. Did we overreact? Yes. But it was necessary so that someone might pay some attention to it. I don’t regret anything I’ve said. All I want to happen is for Loic to talk to us as a human being. Press desks, panels filled with sponsors (sorry, but how does Orange have anything to do with Web 2.0?), ministers shipped in to give stump speeches – none of that is in any way connected to having a conversation.

  12. Paul: “Yet to read the blogs you would think the Geneva Convention had been violated.”

    I know it seems like an over-reaction – but there was a lot of resentment in the room. As one of the ring-leaders among the dissenters, I chose to start posting because I was pissed off that our side of the story wouldn’t be heard. Me, Nicole Simon and Adam Tinworth were blogging away with a dissenting voice because if we didn’t, then I don’t think anyone would have paid any attention to the Sarkozy thing.

    And I’m certainly not going to stop until Loic Le Meur says something. This is a conversational media, yet the organisers of Le Web have had only one reaction – calling Sam Sethi an asshole. We want a conversation about this because we believe in the power of the technology which we are using and/or building.

    Lame conferences where political buddy games are played do not help to promote blogging and conversational media – they are stifled and dull. Europe – and France in particular – deserves better than Le Web. Did we overreact? Yes. But it was necessary so that someone might pay some attention to it. I don’t regret anything I’ve said. All I want to happen is for Loic to talk to us as a human being. Press desks, panels filled with sponsors (sorry, but how does Orange have anything to do with Web 2.0?), ministers shipped in to give stump speeches – none of that is in any way connected to having a conversation.

  13. Paul: “Yet to read the blogs you would think the Geneva Convention had been violated.”

    I know it seems like an over-reaction – but there was a lot of resentment in the room. As one of the ring-leaders among the dissenters, I chose to start posting because I was pissed off that our side of the story wouldn’t be heard. Me, Nicole Simon and Adam Tinworth were blogging away with a dissenting voice because if we didn’t, then I don’t think anyone would have paid any attention to the Sarkozy thing.

    And I’m certainly not going to stop until Loic Le Meur says something. This is a conversational media, yet the organisers of Le Web have had only one reaction – calling Sam Sethi an asshole. We want a conversation about this because we believe in the power of the technology which we are using and/or building.

    Lame conferences where political buddy games are played do not help to promote blogging and conversational media – they are stifled and dull. Europe – and France in particular – deserves better than Le Web. Did we overreact? Yes. But it was necessary so that someone might pay some attention to it. I don’t regret anything I’ve said. All I want to happen is for Loic to talk to us as a human being. Press desks, panels filled with sponsors (sorry, but how does Orange have anything to do with Web 2.0?), ministers shipped in to give stump speeches – none of that is in any way connected to having a conversation.

  14. Wasn’t there but wonder if people suffering through the totalitarian candidate couldn’t have protested in place. Like standing up, turning your back on the speaker, and standing in opposition. Civil disobedience 1A.

    Just reading into the posts, a lot of frustration over connectivity. If there’s a good backchannel and power, bloggers can always shift attention to the virtual world. But when you tie people to their chairs, force them to listen even when they are desperate to change the channel, then they will share their pain.

    I can really see clustering related topics together (like the politicians) so people can opt out of an hour or two and make good hallway.

    BlogHer showed bloggers ain’t homogeneous. So organizers need multiple tracks, parallel sessions, sessions small enough you can hold the illusion of participation, small enough the river of backchannel is readable.

    All the best.

  15. Wasn’t there but wonder if people suffering through the totalitarian candidate couldn’t have protested in place. Like standing up, turning your back on the speaker, and standing in opposition. Civil disobedience 1A.

    Just reading into the posts, a lot of frustration over connectivity. If there’s a good backchannel and power, bloggers can always shift attention to the virtual world. But when you tie people to their chairs, force them to listen even when they are desperate to change the channel, then they will share their pain.

    I can really see clustering related topics together (like the politicians) so people can opt out of an hour or two and make good hallway.

    BlogHer showed bloggers ain’t homogeneous. So organizers need multiple tracks, parallel sessions, sessions small enough you can hold the illusion of participation, small enough the river of backchannel is readable.

    All the best.

  16. Wasn’t there but wonder if people suffering through the totalitarian candidate couldn’t have protested in place. Like standing up, turning your back on the speaker, and standing in opposition. Civil disobedience 1A.

    Just reading into the posts, a lot of frustration over connectivity. If there’s a good backchannel and power, bloggers can always shift attention to the virtual world. But when you tie people to their chairs, force them to listen even when they are desperate to change the channel, then they will share their pain.

    I can really see clustering related topics together (like the politicians) so people can opt out of an hour or two and make good hallway.

    BlogHer showed bloggers ain’t homogeneous. So organizers need multiple tracks, parallel sessions, sessions small enough you can hold the illusion of participation, small enough the river of backchannel is readable.

    All the best.

  17. Wasn’t there but wonder if people suffering through the totalitarian candidate couldn’t have protested in place. Like standing up, turning your back on the speaker, and standing in opposition. Civil disobedience 1A.

    Just reading into the posts, a lot of frustration over connectivity. If there’s a good backchannel and power, bloggers can always shift attention to the virtual world. But when you tie people to their chairs, force them to listen even when they are desperate to change the channel, then they will share their pain.

    I can really see clustering related topics together (like the politicians) so people can opt out of an hour or two and make good hallway.

    BlogHer showed bloggers ain’t homogeneous. So organizers need multiple tracks, parallel sessions, sessions small enough you can hold the illusion of participation, small enough the river of backchannel is readable.

    All the best.

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