Google, the world’s largest startup?

One thing that’s real interesting on my Google interviews is to listen to Mark Lucovsky talk about getting a customer Web developer’s request about Google’s new videobar, coding it during the evening, and having the change up on the guy’s site the next morning.

That brings me back to earlier this week when I complained about a splogger that was in Google and Technorati’s search engine. Both of those removed that guy within a few hours.

I’m hearing more and more about Google reacting quickly to feature requests on blogs like this.

That’s something I want to encourage more of. Can Microsoft keep up with this speed?

Why isn’t Ray Ozzie out in front of bloggers like Mark Lucovsky is? Is he going to “shock and awe” the world?

He just might have something cool up his sleeve, but I like the unexciting approach a lot better. I’m noticing a lot of the Google products I’m using are getting little updates every few days. Most you can’t even notice, but many you can.

Having a big company ship a fix that you request — and do it overnight — is very satisfying. It builds a brand loyalty that will be hard to beat.

What about you? Are you noticing this behavior at Microsoft? Yahoo? Google? Ask?

60 thoughts on “Google, the world’s largest startup?

  1. The bottom line in my book is that listening to feedback keeps you grounded and lets you know what a lot of people want next. Reading blogs and comments on the web provides a huge amount of prioritization in my book: fix what people complain about.

    Sometimes that’s not possible. For example, if we provided the Custom Search Engine without any ads, then I’m sure some Google partners would be asking why they pay for search results when CSE could give them results for free. But most of the time, getting the opinion of the blogosphere is the best type of market research–it’s like having all the smart people in one room.

    P.S. Robert, I’m about to drop you an email about
    http://scobleizer.com/2006/12/14/google-and-technorati-blog-search-rewards-sploggers/
    The blogsearch team looked into it, and it’s because you’re pinging us twice: once with a nice RSS 2.0 feed, and once with an older RSS 0.92 feed.

    P.P.S. Getting problem reports like the one in the last paragraph also make sure that we know about important stuff quickly and tackle it soon. Thanks for mentioning it.

  2. The bottom line in my book is that listening to feedback keeps you grounded and lets you know what a lot of people want next. Reading blogs and comments on the web provides a huge amount of prioritization in my book: fix what people complain about.

    Sometimes that’s not possible. For example, if we provided the Custom Search Engine without any ads, then I’m sure some Google partners would be asking why they pay for search results when CSE could give them results for free. But most of the time, getting the opinion of the blogosphere is the best type of market research–it’s like having all the smart people in one room.

    P.S. Robert, I’m about to drop you an email about
    http://scobleizer.com/2006/12/14/google-and-technorati-blog-search-rewards-sploggers/
    The blogsearch team looked into it, and it’s because you’re pinging us twice: once with a nice RSS 2.0 feed, and once with an older RSS 0.92 feed.

    P.P.S. Getting problem reports like the one in the last paragraph also make sure that we know about important stuff quickly and tackle it soon. Thanks for mentioning it.

  3. @25. Yeah, I remember that one. Hey, I looked at your post. We definitely support site restriction on blog search. For blog and news, we also let you order by relevance or by date.

    You know, you can use custom search engines for blogs too. Check out my blog:
    http://googleajaxsearchapi.blogspot.com/

    Do a search from the form in the upper right and you will see us spill search results into the center column. The all google blogs tab is a CSE I created for all google blogs…

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