One more post…

OK, I’m off until Tuesday. Have a good one.

I see that Long Zheng has started CES Blogs. Not to be confused with the official CES blog.

Oh, goody, Steve Gillmor is back with “Bad Sinatra.” Love this quote: “And Gabe Rivera chimed in a few days ago in email asking what it would look like if I resurfaced. An eight-foot invisible rabbit.”

Heh!

LostRemote is wondering whether to go to MacWorld or CES. Let’s see, CES is at least 10 times bigger and you’ll hear all the Apple news in almost real time anyway. Michael Gartenberg has the real answer to that: both.

James Kendrick says that a bunch of new UMPCs (mobile PCs) are expected at CES. Microsoft is one of the sponsors of the PodTech/Seagate BlogHaus, so hopefully we get a good look.

Anyway, hope there’s lots of fun stuff under your tree, see ya on Tuesday.

Remember to get your “what will you store on it” contest entries in to win a Seagate 750GB hard drive.

Comments

  1. I see you are the sole judge of the contest. Hint to contestants: make sure to repeatedly mention all the HD content you store or plan on storing to score big points with Robert.

  2. I see you are the sole judge of the contest. Hint to contestants: make sure to repeatedly mention all the HD content you store or plan on storing to score big points with Robert.

  3. LostRemote is wondering whether to go to MacWorld or CES. Let’s see, CES is at least 10 times bigger and you’ll hear all the Apple news in almost real time anyway.

    You’ll hear most of the Apple news in near-real time. But that will be headlines, and only the major keynote announcements. You’ll miss a lot of not-huge, yet important announcements, and of course, the conferences, which are the most valuable part of Macworld Expo.

    By the same token, the news flow out of CES is going to inundate you with all the major news from that show, so why bother with a massive show where everyone you want to talk to will have 70,000 other people trying to talk to them too.

    Looking at the CES conferences, FAR too many of them reek of Marketing fests and far too many presenters have “marketing” in their titles. Meh.

  4. LostRemote is wondering whether to go to MacWorld or CES. Let’s see, CES is at least 10 times bigger and you’ll hear all the Apple news in almost real time anyway.

    You’ll hear most of the Apple news in near-real time. But that will be headlines, and only the major keynote announcements. You’ll miss a lot of not-huge, yet important announcements, and of course, the conferences, which are the most valuable part of Macworld Expo.

    By the same token, the news flow out of CES is going to inundate you with all the major news from that show, so why bother with a massive show where everyone you want to talk to will have 70,000 other people trying to talk to them too.

    Looking at the CES conferences, FAR too many of them reek of Marketing fests and far too many presenters have “marketing” in their titles. Meh.

  5. John: good point. But, out of 150,000 attendees, only about 1,000 go to the conferences. I’m speaking at one of the conferences, will provide real value, but I agree with you that the conferences at MacWorld are better and more targetted.

    The thing you go to CES for is the show floor and the networking. Which is unparalleled. There’s no other place in the world where you can see almost every single consumer electronics company in one city.

  6. John: good point. But, out of 150,000 attendees, only about 1,000 go to the conferences. I’m speaking at one of the conferences, will provide real value, but I agree with you that the conferences at MacWorld are better and more targetted.

    The thing you go to CES for is the show floor and the networking. Which is unparalleled. There’s no other place in the world where you can see almost every single consumer electronics company in one city.

  7. Dude, the floor show is intense and huge, but networking on the floor? Like networking in a chicken coop, only with more crap and feathers.

    But it’s really not, nor has it ever been a “which one sucks” decision. Both have different focuses, and reasons for being. You not being at CES would be dumb, no matter how much I rag on you about it, just as me being at CES would be equally dumb, and for pretty much the same reasons.

  8. Dude, the floor show is intense and huge, but networking on the floor? Like networking in a chicken coop, only with more crap and feathers.

    But it’s really not, nor has it ever been a “which one sucks” decision. Both have different focuses, and reasons for being. You not being at CES would be dumb, no matter how much I rag on you about it, just as me being at CES would be equally dumb, and for pretty much the same reasons.

  9. Gary and Shel: you were right. Sigh.

    John: actually the networking there is unparalleled for someone who cares about gadgets. Last year I made relationships with all sorts of journalists and vendors. Plus I got a real good look at the HDTV market, which helped me on my purchase last year. It’s noisy, yes, but EVERYONE (except Apple) is there.

  10. Gary and Shel: you were right. Sigh.

    John: actually the networking there is unparalleled for someone who cares about gadgets. Last year I made relationships with all sorts of journalists and vendors. Plus I got a real good look at the HDTV market, which helped me on my purchase last year. It’s noisy, yes, but EVERYONE (except Apple) is there.

  11. I agree with Michael – both CES and MacWorld – but in reverse order. I’ll be going to CES first, doing all the press conferences and evening events Sunday and Monday, and then heading up to MacWorld for the keynote very very early Tuesday morning.

    There’s nothing quite like CES for cramming in high level meetings with every company you could possibly think of into a few days, and there’s nothing quite like being at a Steve Jobs unveiling of, well, of just about anything, then getting immediate hands-on time with whatever it is.

    -avi

  12. I agree with Michael – both CES and MacWorld – but in reverse order. I’ll be going to CES first, doing all the press conferences and evening events Sunday and Monday, and then heading up to MacWorld for the keynote very very early Tuesday morning.

    There’s nothing quite like CES for cramming in high level meetings with every company you could possibly think of into a few days, and there’s nothing quite like being at a Steve Jobs unveiling of, well, of just about anything, then getting immediate hands-on time with whatever it is.

    -avi