Why bash Microsoft and not Nokia?

Nokia is giving out cell phones to bloggers just like Microsoft gave laptops out, according to Steve Garfield, who got one of the cell phones and wrote a review. These are very expensive models, too.

Again, I don’t mind this. Steve disclosed that he got it for free when he wrote his review. Now, as a reader of Steve’s blog, I have to decide whether Steve is telling the truth or not. I believe he is, he was showing the cell phone around to lots of people last week at the John Edwards’ rally in New Hampshire and it gave me lots of gadget envy.

Disclaimer of my own. I’ve gotten Nokia cell phones for free in the past too.

130 thoughts on “Why bash Microsoft and not Nokia?

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  2. Why bashing MS and not Nokia? I thought it’s obvious. The bloggers in the MS affair were Maczealots. Sending a Windows laptop to a Mactard is like placing a bloody horse head in their bed.

  3. Why bashing MS and not Nokia? I thought it’s obvious. The bloggers in the MS affair were Maczealots. Sending a Windows laptop to a Mactard is like placing a bloody horse head in their bed.

  4. I wrote about this a couple days ago on my blog – where I am a Nokia blogger, and disclosed – and what the differences are.

    It’s an apples / oranges, thing, though.

  5. I wrote about this a couple days ago on my blog – where I am a Nokia blogger, and disclosed – and what the differences are.

    It’s an apples / oranges, thing, though.

  6. I’ve been trying to get on Nokia’s list of folks who can test their phones. I’m a fan of Nokia, but their phones have issues just like anything else. I’d praise the good, and complain about what is wrong, all in the hope that it would be improved in the next rev…

  7. I’ve been trying to get on Nokia’s list of folks who can test their phones. I’m a fan of Nokia, but their phones have issues just like anything else. I’d praise the good, and complain about what is wrong, all in the hope that it would be improved in the next rev…

  8. A heated debate: I guess the teaching for tech companies is not to send anything, but have the potential blogger fill in a form like:

    [] Send me the disk (and a return envelope)

    [] Send me your product with supporting platform :Wink:

    [] I’ll buy it, just allow me to do so in advance

  9. A heated debate: I guess the teaching for tech companies is not to send anything, but have the potential blogger fill in a form like:

    [] Send me the disk (and a return envelope)

    [] Send me your product with supporting platform :Wink:

    [] I’ll buy it, just allow me to do so in advance

  10. Okay, in this bizzaro fantasy world where Metrowerks hadn’t abandoned CodeWarrior for their embedded platform tools, why would Apple want to spend the time and resources to develop/enhance Xcode (which they don’t make a dime on) when an outside company was going to instead?

    Metrowerks didn’t want to spend the developer time because they were refocusing on a more profitable embedded market, which is why they sold off their x86 stuff to Nokia.

    I don’t see what Apple has gained from this muscling out CodeWarrior, they don’t sell Xcode and it costs Apple a very non-trivial amount of resources.

  11. Okay, in this bizzaro fantasy world where Metrowerks hadn’t abandoned CodeWarrior for their embedded platform tools, why would Apple want to spend the time and resources to develop/enhance Xcode (which they don’t make a dime on) when an outside company was going to instead?

    Metrowerks didn’t want to spend the developer time because they were refocusing on a more profitable embedded market, which is why they sold off their x86 stuff to Nokia.

    I don’t see what Apple has gained from this muscling out CodeWarrior, they don’t sell Xcode and it costs Apple a very non-trivial amount of resources.

  12. While it’s possible for a blogger to write an objective post about Vista AND keep the laptop, a discerning reader must view the opinion as tainted.

    Edelman wouldn’t offer a freebie like this to the New York Times, would they? First because it violates the ethical guidelines of most respectable MSM outets, but also because credibility with readers is compromised in the process. You know, once in a while the MSM folks have ideals worth emulating. This is one of those times.

    For my complete take: http://toughsledding.wordpress.com/2007/01/03/free-laptops-land-edelman-in-ethics-hotseat-again/

  13. While it’s possible for a blogger to write an objective post about Vista AND keep the laptop, a discerning reader must view the opinion as tainted.

    Edelman wouldn’t offer a freebie like this to the New York Times, would they? First because it violates the ethical guidelines of most respectable MSM outets, but also because credibility with readers is compromised in the process. You know, once in a while the MSM folks have ideals worth emulating. This is one of those times.

    For my complete take: http://toughsledding.wordpress.com/2007/01/03/free-laptops-land-edelman-in-ethics-hotseat-again/

  14. There are generally two schools of thought on things being free:

    1. There is no such thing as a free lunch.

    2. As my grandfather used to always say, if someone’s giving you something for free – TAKE IT – and worry about the strings later.

    Sorry gramps, but I’m more along the mindset of #1.

    Any tech company giving me something supposedly for free wants my bones, blood, and soul. I’ll buy my own damn laptop and phone.

  15. There are generally two schools of thought on things being free:

    1. There is no such thing as a free lunch.

    2. As my grandfather used to always say, if someone’s giving you something for free – TAKE IT – and worry about the strings later.

    Sorry gramps, but I’m more along the mindset of #1.

    Any tech company giving me something supposedly for free wants my bones, blood, and soul. I’ll buy my own damn laptop and phone.

  16. The value of the freebie is relevant. The more expensive, the greater the potential to influence, as your $1 million vs. $100 debate illustrates.

    We all know that, and that’s why the review you link to failed to fully disclose the freebie. The retail value was not disclosed. I guess if you know the guy and know cell phones, you would have an idea of the cost. I don’t, so I can’t really judge how much incentive he has to say nice things about the phone and gloss over some problems.

    If bloggers want to take free stuff, fine as long as they disclose properly and no one is being deceived.

    As for whether companies should send free laptops to bloggers so they can try out some software that doesn’t work as the average machine, well that’s a completely different story. It was a stupid thing for the companies to do because they gained nothing from it.

  17. The value of the freebie is relevant. The more expensive, the greater the potential to influence, as your $1 million vs. $100 debate illustrates.

    We all know that, and that’s why the review you link to failed to fully disclose the freebie. The retail value was not disclosed. I guess if you know the guy and know cell phones, you would have an idea of the cost. I don’t, so I can’t really judge how much incentive he has to say nice things about the phone and gloss over some problems.

    If bloggers want to take free stuff, fine as long as they disclose properly and no one is being deceived.

    As for whether companies should send free laptops to bloggers so they can try out some software that doesn’t work as the average machine, well that’s a completely different story. It was a stupid thing for the companies to do because they gained nothing from it.

  18. @55 Interesting, but not really relevant. The gift baskets for the celebrities are really just additional incentives to get them to show up at the events, and/or “payment/thank yous” for showing up. Same happens, for example at college bowl games. The players get gift baskets with lots of stuff. But, the players aren’t expected to shill for those companies. Neither are the celebrities.

    There’s a difference between getting a gift and bribing someone to hopefully say good things about your product.

  19. @55 Interesting, but not really relevant. The gift baskets for the celebrities are really just additional incentives to get them to show up at the events, and/or “payment/thank yous” for showing up. Same happens, for example at college bowl games. The players get gift baskets with lots of stuff. But, the players aren’t expected to shill for those companies. Neither are the celebrities.

    There’s a difference between getting a gift and bribing someone to hopefully say good things about your product.

  20. @Bob Jones

    Um, no. You now darn well that the big devs like MS and Adobe were using CodeWarrior up until the intel switch, and only swithched to Xcode because XCode is the only IDE that can make universal binaries. This is common knowledge; don’t sit there and try to pretend that Codewarrior abandoned the market and forced everyone to switch to XCode. They didn’t abandon the market until they were forced out by Jobs.

  21. @Bob Jones

    Um, no. You now darn well that the big devs like MS and Adobe were using CodeWarrior up until the intel switch, and only swithched to Xcode because XCode is the only IDE that can make universal binaries. This is common knowledge; don’t sit there and try to pretend that Codewarrior abandoned the market and forced everyone to switch to XCode. They didn’t abandon the market until they were forced out by Jobs.

  22. For some outside perspective on gifts, three suggestions:

    Read the piece in The NY Times today, byRonald Pies, M.D. for a look at the issues involved when patients offer gifts to therapists.

    Watch episode 7 of season 6 of the Sopranos, “Luxury Lounge.” See what happens when Christopher Moltisante encounters the marketing practice of bestowing luxury gifts on celebrities.

    Listen to Frank Loesser’s “Take back your Mink” from Guys and Dolls. (“I thought that each expensive gift you’d arrange was a token of your esteem. Now when I think of what you want in exchange, it all seems a horrible dream.”)

  23. For some outside perspective on gifts, three suggestions:

    Read the piece in The NY Times today, byRonald Pies, M.D. for a look at the issues involved when patients offer gifts to therapists.

    Watch episode 7 of season 6 of the Sopranos, “Luxury Lounge.” See what happens when Christopher Moltisante encounters the marketing practice of bestowing luxury gifts on celebrities.

    Listen to Frank Loesser’s “Take back your Mink” from Guys and Dolls. (“I thought that each expensive gift you’d arrange was a token of your esteem. Now when I think of what you want in exchange, it all seems a horrible dream.”)

  24. @Bob Jones,
    Project Builder predates OS X by many years — my NeXT Cube circa 1993 has an almost identical version of Project Builder to the one that Apple shipped in 10.0. As for XCode, Project Builder was, as noted above, early 90s technology. Competing development environments (Eclipse, IDEA, VS.Net) are newer and have more conveniences (code completion, for one), so Apple had to do something about upgrading Project Builder. Unlike Microsoft and Jetbrains, though, Apple provided it for free.

  25. @Bob Jones,
    Project Builder predates OS X by many years — my NeXT Cube circa 1993 has an almost identical version of Project Builder to the one that Apple shipped in 10.0. As for XCode, Project Builder was, as noted above, early 90s technology. Competing development environments (Eclipse, IDEA, VS.Net) are newer and have more conveniences (code completion, for one), so Apple had to do something about upgrading Project Builder. Unlike Microsoft and Jetbrains, though, Apple provided it for free.

  26. Nokia not being monopoly? Why nobody mentioned Symbian Ltd yet?! Symbian Ltd is owned in 49% by Nokia and practically is controlled by Nokia so if companies license Symbian for smartphones Nokia gets half of that no matter what… and on the hand Nokia itself releases Symbian phones with earlier access to the code and insider infos practically cannabilizing license takers of Symbian. In other words Symbian Ltd is just a puppet of Nokia, a cover-up invented to hide Nokia’s monopoly.

    So you see that Nokia is even worse than Microsoft – Microsoft is licensing Windows Mobile operating system but is not making Windows Mobile phones – and Nokia through their Symbian puppet do both!

    Scoble is spot on!

  27. Nokia not being monopoly? Why nobody mentioned Symbian Ltd yet?! Symbian Ltd is owned in 49% by Nokia and practically is controlled by Nokia so if companies license Symbian for smartphones Nokia gets half of that no matter what… and on the hand Nokia itself releases Symbian phones with earlier access to the code and insider infos practically cannabilizing license takers of Symbian. In other words Symbian Ltd is just a puppet of Nokia, a cover-up invented to hide Nokia’s monopoly.

    So you see that Nokia is even worse than Microsoft – Microsoft is licensing Windows Mobile operating system but is not making Windows Mobile phones – and Nokia through their Symbian puppet do both!

    Scoble is spot on!

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