YouTube pulling down posts

JD Lasica had a post removed from YouTube the other day. It’s not the first time. Rabbit Bites had a parody of Oprah pulled after one of Oprah’s lawyers complained to YouTube (they didn’t even email the show to get their side of story — parody is acceptable under US copyright law).

If you don’t see more posts from me today, it’s not due to YouTube. Maryam and I have a ton of chores to do to get ready for going to the LIFT conference in Switzerland.

Some CES cleanup: if you won in the Seagate contest we ran leading up to CES, can you contact Maryam with your street address and we’ll send out your prize? maryam@podtech.net.

Anyway, have a great Friday!

18 thoughts on “YouTube pulling down posts

  1. My daughter (10) scans and watches most Sky (UK) versions of The Simpsons on YouTube as well as other copyrighted material – cartoons. YouTube, its full of it.

    It got the audience is has purely from having content you cant find anywhere else (easily). Get rid of the copied stuff and YouTube will lose its audience. I predict YouTube will be gone in 5 years time, or another less ‘copyright’ minded startup will have overtaken it.

  2. My daughter (10) scans and watches most Sky (UK) versions of The Simpsons on YouTube as well as other copyrighted material – cartoons. YouTube, its full of it.

    It got the audience is has purely from having content you cant find anywhere else (easily). Get rid of the copied stuff and YouTube will lose its audience. I predict YouTube will be gone in 5 years time, or another less ‘copyright’ minded startup will have overtaken it.

  3. Right. go after the law itself. Agreed. Of course to do so you need a lawyer. The lawyers don’t seem to have much interest in stabbing their money-generating system in the eye. Consequently: forget it. Ain’t gonna happen and you ain’t gonna win. American law needs a massive overhaul, but it will never happen so long as Law Schools promote the concept of Law as a Money Making Scheme, rather than the Vehicle of Justice in the Land. So forget it.

  4. Right. go after the law itself. Agreed. Of course to do so you need a lawyer. The lawyers don’t seem to have much interest in stabbing their money-generating system in the eye. Consequently: forget it. Ain’t gonna happen and you ain’t gonna win. American law needs a massive overhaul, but it will never happen so long as Law Schools promote the concept of Law as a Money Making Scheme, rather than the Vehicle of Justice in the Land. So forget it.

  5. Don’t take me for a Google or YouTube apologist, because I’m far from it, but in this case it’s simply not their fault, they are merely complying with the take down provisions on the DMCA. Short story: if you’re hosting something and you’re served with a DMCA notice, even if it’s rubbish, you’re pretty much obliged to take the item down until such time the content creator files a counter claim to the take down notice…and as the host if you fail to comply with a take down notice you also become liable in any future action over breach of copyright with the person who put the content there in the first place…hence hosts (including YouTube) pull stuff down without question *ALL THE TIME*. Is it wrong? Hell yes, but thats the DMCA for you and the stupidity of American law. If anything go after the law, not firms such as Google which are forced to comply with it.

  6. Don’t take me for a Google or YouTube apologist, because I’m far from it, but in this case it’s simply not their fault, they are merely complying with the take down provisions on the DMCA. Short story: if you’re hosting something and you’re served with a DMCA notice, even if it’s rubbish, you’re pretty much obliged to take the item down until such time the content creator files a counter claim to the take down notice…and as the host if you fail to comply with a take down notice you also become liable in any future action over breach of copyright with the person who put the content there in the first place…hence hosts (including YouTube) pull stuff down without question *ALL THE TIME*. Is it wrong? Hell yes, but thats the DMCA for you and the stupidity of American law. If anything go after the law, not firms such as Google which are forced to comply with it.

  7. This is disturbing, but to be expected. Technically, since the blogs (server space) is not owned by the author, they reserve the right to delete posts which could be potentially litigious.

    I disagree with this since it smacks of censorship, but I understand since we live in the most litigious society the planet has ever seen.

    Solution: own and operate your own blog and server space. It’s not expensive. CAVEAT: You could be sued by litigious agents of fortune looking to make a quick buck from someone who they know has no power team of overpriced litigious practioners.

    I’m convinced that as the years go on and blogging becomes a “norm” like email, that we will start seeing a ton of lawsuits over things posted on blogs. I don’t have a blog since I’m not politically correct and what I have to say about politicians and my views would likely be taken the “right” way. I don’t mince my words and I shouldn’t have to for anyone. My blog, my opinions. Unfortunately, however, the US tort reform is a long way, if ever, from occuring.

    Moreover, I’m concerned that what people truly want to say, they cannot, even now. Some people risk it all on their blogs, but they may one day rue the day they did. Employers are always scouring the net for potential employees’ blogs and web sites. Hence, I have neither. I work for a very conservative employer that would not appreciate my blogging. I both like my employer and my job, but it’s not a risk I’m willing to take, at least not under my real name.

    Google doing this does not surprise me in the least. Yahoo doing this on Geocities or on Flickr would not surprise me either. Both of these companies have complied with requests from the Chinese in pursuing men/women who were only doing what they thought was right.

    Funny thing: Trade with Cuba is wrong because the country is communist, but trade with China and Vietnam is vital to a spirit of international harmony.

  8. This is disturbing, but to be expected. Technically, since the blogs (server space) is not owned by the author, they reserve the right to delete posts which could be potentially litigious.

    I disagree with this since it smacks of censorship, but I understand since we live in the most litigious society the planet has ever seen.

    Solution: own and operate your own blog and server space. It’s not expensive. CAVEAT: You could be sued by litigious agents of fortune looking to make a quick buck from someone who they know has no power team of overpriced litigious practioners.

    I’m convinced that as the years go on and blogging becomes a “norm” like email, that we will start seeing a ton of lawsuits over things posted on blogs. I don’t have a blog since I’m not politically correct and what I have to say about politicians and my views would likely be taken the “right” way. I don’t mince my words and I shouldn’t have to for anyone. My blog, my opinions. Unfortunately, however, the US tort reform is a long way, if ever, from occuring.

    Moreover, I’m concerned that what people truly want to say, they cannot, even now. Some people risk it all on their blogs, but they may one day rue the day they did. Employers are always scouring the net for potential employees’ blogs and web sites. Hence, I have neither. I work for a very conservative employer that would not appreciate my blogging. I both like my employer and my job, but it’s not a risk I’m willing to take, at least not under my real name.

    Google doing this does not surprise me in the least. Yahoo doing this on Geocities or on Flickr would not surprise me either. Both of these companies have complied with requests from the Chinese in pursuing men/women who were only doing what they thought was right.

    Funny thing: Trade with Cuba is wrong because the country is communist, but trade with China and Vietnam is vital to a spirit of international harmony.

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