Comparing blog search engines for Seagate news

OK, let’s look again at blog search engines. It’s been just about an hour since Seagate’s news went up. So, let’s compare blog search engines and see how they are doing.

Google Blog Search for Seagate (note, this is different than the “main” Google engine — also, you have to click “sorted by date” to get the latest stuff).
IceRocket for Seagate.
Sphere for Seagate.
Technorati for Seagate.
Ask for Seagate.

Sorry guys. Google is just trouncing you here. Not only did it have my article first, but it had Jon Fortt’s article on DAVE first too.

Google’s blog search also has less noise. My second favorite? It’s Ask. It had both my article and Gizmodo’s mention of it last night.

Technorati? Dave Sifry, what’s going on? Your engine is looking worse and worse as time goes along. I find that I’m using Technorati less and less as time goes along too. Nothing about DAVE is up on Technorati yet. In fact, I wonder if Technorati is even indexing my blog anymore?

Not a good performance at all for Technorati. If a big company (two, actually) are already beating a startup on speed and quality (they are) then the startup is toast.

Why are blog search engines important? Because it’s how everyone from political campaigns to corporate officers inside places like Seagate listen to what the bloggers are saying about them.

If a blog search engine isn’t up to the minute then the people who use that engine are at a disadvantage to people who are using another engine. It’s why I can link out to interesting stuff about Seagate before other bloggers wake up.

Oh, and it’s also a way I can keep track of who’s linking or not. :-)

One thing I don’t like about Google’s blog search is that it defaults to “sort by relevance.” I far prefer the “Sorted by date” option (you have to click that on the top right side of the page to get it to show you the newest stuff it found).

How long does it take your blog about Seagate to get into the blog search engines?

UPDATE: It’s now 6:12 a.m. — more than two hours since announcement — and Technorati still doesn’t have a single mention of DAVE. It doesn’t even have Gizmodo’s mention of Seagate that was posted last night. If Technorati isn’t getting Gizmodo into its index, what hope does any other blogger have of getting into Technorati. Google actually has improved over the past two hours, while Technorati has gotten worse. And people wonder why I’m a Google fan…

Comments

  1. Good observation. I personally have found Ask to be a better blog search tool as well. While I’m fairly new to blogging I have have been reading them and searching for them for years, and I’ve already pretty much relegated Technorati to very low priority, near to complete dismissal

    I have heard other grumblings about Technorati as well.

  2. Good observation. I personally have found Ask to be a better blog search tool as well. While I’m fairly new to blogging I have have been reading them and searching for them for years, and I’ve already pretty much relegated Technorati to very low priority, near to complete dismissal

    I have heard other grumblings about Technorati as well.

  3. More marketing for Seagate masked as a “conversation” about blog search…nice touch. You have not found the right balance yet to re-establish the “authentic you” since landing at Podtech. From the grumblings, it seems that the authentic you is what long time readers respected about you.

    I read your book…and for some strange reason, I actually believed that you meant the things that you wrote. It’s rather ironic that your blog no longer seems to embody the principles that made your book so popular. There’s really very little “naked conversation” here at all anymore…

    Selling your soul doesnt seem to be the answer either, but at least your brand’s implosion by doing so makes interesting reading….and thats all that matters right? If readership goes down, there is always the guaranteed Microsoft/Apple/Google linkbait article.

  4. More marketing for Seagate masked as a “conversation” about blog search…nice touch. You have not found the right balance yet to re-establish the “authentic you” since landing at Podtech. From the grumblings, it seems that the authentic you is what long time readers respected about you.

    I read your book…and for some strange reason, I actually believed that you meant the things that you wrote. It’s rather ironic that your blog no longer seems to embody the principles that made your book so popular. There’s really very little “naked conversation” here at all anymore…

    Selling your soul doesnt seem to be the answer either, but at least your brand’s implosion by doing so makes interesting reading….and thats all that matters right? If readership goes down, there is always the guaranteed Microsoft/Apple/Google linkbait article.

  5. “Who Knew:” one of the principles about my book is that having a conversation is a lot better if you sign your name to things. Where’s yours?

    But, regarding my “authentic me,” if you want that, then watch the “Cooking with Geeks” thing and avoid anything that is getting sponsored. It’s very easy to do. Just search my RSS feed for “Seagate” or “Intel” and delete any post that has those two in it and read everything else.

    Seagate is the topic of conversation this morning. Tomorrow we’ll be talking about something else.

  6. “Who Knew:” one of the principles about my book is that having a conversation is a lot better if you sign your name to things. Where’s yours?

    But, regarding my “authentic me,” if you want that, then watch the “Cooking with Geeks” thing and avoid anything that is getting sponsored. It’s very easy to do. Just search my RSS feed for “Seagate” or “Intel” and delete any post that has those two in it and read everything else.

    Seagate is the topic of conversation this morning. Tomorrow we’ll be talking about something else.

  7. I would like to see Google put it’s blog search engine link on the main page. I use their personalized home page and have the blog search as a link in my bookmarks.
    The default links : Web Images Video News Maps more , are needed also, but with the popularity of blogging, Google becoming a predominate force as a RSS reader, it would be nice that I could do a search with having to jump all over the place.

    Guy

  8. I would like to see Google put it’s blog search engine link on the main page. I use their personalized home page and have the blog search as a link in my bookmarks.
    The default links : Web Images Video News Maps more , are needed also, but with the popularity of blogging, Google becoming a predominate force as a RSS reader, it would be nice that I could do a search with having to jump all over the place.

    Guy

  9. Robert,
    I totally agree w/ poster #2. IT seems less and less of news and other great tech news/information and more and more why does no one link to me and why can’t I find my blog better on the search engines….

    You have completely sold out and are nothing but a big shill for your sponsers. SOrry I enjoyed reading your blog more when you were at Microsoft.

  10. Robert,
    I totally agree w/ poster #2. IT seems less and less of news and other great tech news/information and more and more why does no one link to me and why can’t I find my blog better on the search engines….

    You have completely sold out and are nothing but a big shill for your sponsers. SOrry I enjoyed reading your blog more when you were at Microsoft.

  11. Jonathan: nothing but a big shill for my sponsors? Hmmm, I’ve put up more than 120 videos. Only about five have been from my sponsors.

    So, ignore those. But, so far only about 5% of my work has been for my sponsors. Far from “nothing.”

  12. Jonathan: nothing but a big shill for my sponsors? Hmmm, I’ve put up more than 120 videos. Only about five have been from my sponsors.

    So, ignore those. But, so far only about 5% of my work has been for my sponsors. Far from “nothing.”

  13. And, anyway, replace “Seagate” above with anything else. The point still stands. Google is kicking ass in the blog search business.

    But, I guess, no one wants to talk about THAT.

    Note that Google is NOT one of my sponsors, which refutes your whole point that I’m totally sold out and not bringing any value here.

  14. And, anyway, replace “Seagate” above with anything else. The point still stands. Google is kicking ass in the blog search business.

    But, I guess, no one wants to talk about THAT.

    Note that Google is NOT one of my sponsors, which refutes your whole point that I’m totally sold out and not bringing any value here.

  15. Do you get some sort of bonus depending on how many times you type the word Seagate since they are a sponsor of yours? What happed to full disclosure? Shouldn’t you have mentioned in this post that Seagate PAYS you?

  16. Do you get some sort of bonus depending on how many times you type the word Seagate since they are a sponsor of yours? What happed to full disclosure? Shouldn’t you have mentioned in this post that Seagate PAYS you?

  17. Frank: I mentioned that in the post just previous to this one.

    If you don’t know Seagate pays me by now, you aren’t a reader I want sticking around here.

    No, I get no bonus. In fact, Seagate has not made any mentions of them on my blog a requirement for their sponsorship. Translation: they are getting all this for free.

    But, I appreciate companies who pay my salary and let me keep doing what I love to do.

  18. Frank: I mentioned that in the post just previous to this one.

    If you don’t know Seagate pays me by now, you aren’t a reader I want sticking around here.

    No, I get no bonus. In fact, Seagate has not made any mentions of them on my blog a requirement for their sponsorship. Translation: they are getting all this for free.

    But, I appreciate companies who pay my salary and let me keep doing what I love to do.

  19. How long do you think those companies will continue to pay your salary after you have lost all credibility with your readers?

  20. How long do you think those companies will continue to pay your salary after you have lost all credibility with your readers?

  21. “Google’s blog search also has less noise. My second favorite? It’s Ask. It had both my article and Gizmodo’s mention of it last night.”

    I’d put Ask in first place for relevance ranking and for finding unexpected references, but Google’s blog search first for completeness and speed (how fast results appear). Then IceRocket, which still finds a few things the others don’t.

    Technorati’s at the bottom of the list. I only check it once every week or two, and the results are sparse and disappointing.

  22. “Google’s blog search also has less noise. My second favorite? It’s Ask. It had both my article and Gizmodo’s mention of it last night.”

    I’d put Ask in first place for relevance ranking and for finding unexpected references, but Google’s blog search first for completeness and speed (how fast results appear). Then IceRocket, which still finds a few things the others don’t.

    Technorati’s at the bottom of the list. I only check it once every week or two, and the results are sparse and disappointing.

  23. Anonymous? Oh Robert, what do you want? I gave you my name and email address? I don’t have a blog that is why I left it blank. I am a longtime reader of yours Robert who has been amazed at the very least and disturbed at the very best with many of your posts recently. Or does this go back to your linking article Robert, that unless I am someone big or have a big blog, I am irrelevant to you?

  24. Anonymous? Oh Robert, what do you want? I gave you my name and email address? I don’t have a blog that is why I left it blank. I am a longtime reader of yours Robert who has been amazed at the very least and disturbed at the very best with many of your posts recently. Or does this go back to your linking article Robert, that unless I am someone big or have a big blog, I am irrelevant to you?

  25. Frank: yes, why don’t you? So we can judge your background and who you work for and what biases you bring to the conversation. Sounds like you’re holding me up to a standard that you don’t want to live up to yourself.

  26. Frank: yes, why don’t you? So we can judge your background and who you work for and what biases you bring to the conversation. Sounds like you’re holding me up to a standard that you don’t want to live up to yourself.

  27. Holy Cow people – Scoble’s making a legitimate interesting point here about the changing dynamic of the second teir search business – and he used an example relevant to his life to illustrate it – big deal! Everyone needs to get off their righteous high horses and rejoin the conversation at ground level.

    That being said – agreed with everyone that’s pointed to TR’s declining quality. The “autority” ranking I find to be good for filtering out the splogs, etc – but their index is still sparse and out of date.

    I’ve also always liked TR for their API, which is a great resource. But that API hasn’t gotten much of an update in the year and a half that I’ve used it.

    So – they’re flat on the consumer front, flat on the developer front – does TR enter the “deadpool” yet?

    Perhaps its a case of the didn’t-get-aquired-blues.

  28. Holy Cow people – Scoble’s making a legitimate interesting point here about the changing dynamic of the second teir search business – and he used an example relevant to his life to illustrate it – big deal! Everyone needs to get off their righteous high horses and rejoin the conversation at ground level.

    That being said – agreed with everyone that’s pointed to TR’s declining quality. The “autority” ranking I find to be good for filtering out the splogs, etc – but their index is still sparse and out of date.

    I’ve also always liked TR for their API, which is a great resource. But that API hasn’t gotten much of an update in the year and a half that I’ve used it.

    So – they’re flat on the consumer front, flat on the developer front – does TR enter the “deadpool” yet?

    Perhaps its a case of the didn’t-get-aquired-blues.

  29. Robert, based on the actions you have taken over the last couple of days, I think you’re setting the bar a bit high for yourself when it comes to the standard I hold myself to. How about you just start being honest with people and you can work up from there?

    Why for this article did you choose to use Seagate as your example? You could of chosen any company out there. Why use them? You’re saying that Seagate being a sponsor had nothing to do with that? And I am not necessarily saying there is anything wrong with that. The issue here Robert is transparency and honesty.

  30. Robert, based on the actions you have taken over the last couple of days, I think you’re setting the bar a bit high for yourself when it comes to the standard I hold myself to. How about you just start being honest with people and you can work up from there?

    Why for this article did you choose to use Seagate as your example? You could of chosen any company out there. Why use them? You’re saying that Seagate being a sponsor had nothing to do with that? And I am not necessarily saying there is anything wrong with that. The issue here Robert is transparency and honesty.

  31. Frank: yes, why don’t you? So we can judge your background and who you work for and what biases you bring to the conversation. Sounds like you’re holding me up to a standard that you don’t want to live up to yourself.

    Thank you Robert for so perfectly illustrating my point that you need to get the hell out of your little technocirclejerk “cone of bits’ more often. It’s really amusing how the idea that only those with blogs are “legitmate” in your eyes.

    I really should start that “Real world for the tech dork” thing I’ve been thinking about. Lord knows, you’re the poster child for it.

  32. Frank: yes, why don’t you? So we can judge your background and who you work for and what biases you bring to the conversation. Sounds like you’re holding me up to a standard that you don’t want to live up to yourself.

    Thank you Robert for so perfectly illustrating my point that you need to get the hell out of your little technocirclejerk “cone of bits’ more often. It’s really amusing how the idea that only those with blogs are “legitmate” in your eyes.

    I really should start that “Real world for the tech dork” thing I’ve been thinking about. Lord knows, you’re the poster child for it.

  33. John: did I say anything about blogs above? No.

    I want to know who Frank is. Who does he work for?

    DOes he work for a competitor of mine? Does he work for Technorati?

    Sounds like it, cause he’s taking a blog post about one thing (blog search) and changing it into another thing (my credibility).

    This isn’t about blogging at all.

    I’ve met you. You have a TON of credibility with me because I know who you are, where you work, where you’re coming from, what your biases are.

    What do we know about Frank? Nothing other than he claims his name is “Frank.” Translation: HE has no credibility and is holding me up to a standard that HE isn’t willing to hold himself up to.

    That, to me, is worth pointing out.

  34. John: did I say anything about blogs above? No.

    I want to know who Frank is. Who does he work for?

    DOes he work for a competitor of mine? Does he work for Technorati?

    Sounds like it, cause he’s taking a blog post about one thing (blog search) and changing it into another thing (my credibility).

    This isn’t about blogging at all.

    I’ve met you. You have a TON of credibility with me because I know who you are, where you work, where you’re coming from, what your biases are.

    What do we know about Frank? Nothing other than he claims his name is “Frank.” Translation: HE has no credibility and is holding me up to a standard that HE isn’t willing to hold himself up to.

    That, to me, is worth pointing out.

  35. >Why for this article did you choose to use Seagate as your example?

    Because I wrote about it this morning and was interested in tracking the news spread since I was the first one to break this story.

    Other stories I’m not sure who is first, so it’s hard to really use it to guage blog search quality.

  36. >Why for this article did you choose to use Seagate as your example?

    Because I wrote about it this morning and was interested in tracking the news spread since I was the first one to break this story.

    Other stories I’m not sure who is first, so it’s hard to really use it to guage blog search quality.

  37. Ah, I see so once again it is all about you. I think you have made that position of yours perfectly clear over the last couple of days.

    Thanks Robert for confirming what I am sure more than just myself have been questioning about you recently.

    Mr. No Credibility, because I don’t have a big blog like Robert Scoble, signing off.

  38. Ah, I see so once again it is all about you. I think you have made that position of yours perfectly clear over the last couple of days.

    Thanks Robert for confirming what I am sure more than just myself have been questioning about you recently.

    Mr. No Credibility, because I don’t have a big blog like Robert Scoble, signing off.

  39. Jeepers… Scoble compared a few search engine results for a story that was relevant to HIM. He is excited about the new DAVE device and mused a bit about search tools that are picking up (or not picking up) the story. We expect far too much, this is, after all, a personal blog. If you want to dictate the content, go to Digg.

  40. Jeepers… Scoble compared a few search engine results for a story that was relevant to HIM. He is excited about the new DAVE device and mused a bit about search tools that are picking up (or not picking up) the story. We expect far too much, this is, after all, a personal blog. If you want to dictate the content, go to Digg.

  41. Robert, first off who is running and hiding? You can make this about me, but it’s not, it’s about you and your credibility.

    I don’t work for Technorati or anyone else that you think is against you. Maybe it is time to come out of the bunker. I actually have been a longtime reader of yours Robert, but as everyone can see by your real quality responses to me, that seemed to be of very little value to you.

    If you actually want to know more about me Robert, you have my email address, feel free to email. If you are just doing this to make yourself look better in this comment thread, I think that is a lost cause.

  42. Robert, first off who is running and hiding? You can make this about me, but it’s not, it’s about you and your credibility.

    I don’t work for Technorati or anyone else that you think is against you. Maybe it is time to come out of the bunker. I actually have been a longtime reader of yours Robert, but as everyone can see by your real quality responses to me, that seemed to be of very little value to you.

    If you actually want to know more about me Robert, you have my email address, feel free to email. If you are just doing this to make yourself look better in this comment thread, I think that is a lost cause.

  43. “Sorry guys. Google is just trouncing you here. Not only did it have my article first, but it had Jon Fortt’s article on DAVE first too.

    Google’s blog search also has less noise. My second favorite? It’s Ask. It had both my article and Gizmodo’s mention of it last night.”

    I think your point would be better made by just comparing specific events, and not individual articles. It seems your criteria for a ‘good’ search is weather or not *your* article is linked. I don’t think that is the best barometer of a search engine.

    And since we’re into full disclosure now, I work for a university, and my support comes from US government research grants. I’m not affiliated with any search company :)

  44. “Sorry guys. Google is just trouncing you here. Not only did it have my article first, but it had Jon Fortt’s article on DAVE first too.

    Google’s blog search also has less noise. My second favorite? It’s Ask. It had both my article and Gizmodo’s mention of it last night.”

    I think your point would be better made by just comparing specific events, and not individual articles. It seems your criteria for a ‘good’ search is weather or not *your* article is linked. I don’t think that is the best barometer of a search engine.

    And since we’re into full disclosure now, I work for a university, and my support comes from US government research grants. I’m not affiliated with any search company :)

  45. Brian: no. All the search above is for simply the word “Seagate.” I also wanted to see who else wrote about Seagate, and how they found the information.

    OK, replace “Seagate” with anything else. Do my points about blog search engines still hold?

  46. Brian: no. All the search above is for simply the word “Seagate.” I also wanted to see who else wrote about Seagate, and how they found the information.

    OK, replace “Seagate” with anything else. Do my points about blog search engines still hold?

  47. Man alive. Brian – Scoble’s comparing the effectiveness of spidering/indexing – which can be gauged by how quickly a post from a blog that’s known to be widely crawled can get into the end-user searchable index.

    Frank – yes, Robert can sound a little off center now and then (as can we all), but it sounds like you’ve got a chip on your shoulder.

  48. Man alive. Brian – Scoble’s comparing the effectiveness of spidering/indexing – which can be gauged by how quickly a post from a blog that’s known to be widely crawled can get into the end-user searchable index.

    Frank – yes, Robert can sound a little off center now and then (as can we all), but it sounds like you’ve got a chip on your shoulder.

  49. >>You can make this about me, but it’s not, it’s about you and your credibility.

    I get that already. This whole blog post, though, is about blog search and how well it is working. I am tracking a specific event and how well the search engines pick stuff up.

    It’s interesting how you took it off track and the fact that we don’t know anything about you (and I’m not going to email you, if you don’t have the ability to say it in public that speaks to your credibility) shows that you are willing to shoot arrows, but aren’t willing to put yourself through that scrutiny.

    Hence: I have more credibility than you, even after blowing a wad of it in the past four days. I blew it pretty darn transparently and out in public, too.

  50. >>You can make this about me, but it’s not, it’s about you and your credibility.

    I get that already. This whole blog post, though, is about blog search and how well it is working. I am tracking a specific event and how well the search engines pick stuff up.

    It’s interesting how you took it off track and the fact that we don’t know anything about you (and I’m not going to email you, if you don’t have the ability to say it in public that speaks to your credibility) shows that you are willing to shoot arrows, but aren’t willing to put yourself through that scrutiny.

    Hence: I have more credibility than you, even after blowing a wad of it in the past four days. I blew it pretty darn transparently and out in public, too.

  51. Robert,
    To give you an answer to your last question, I posted at 08:37 am CST and I am still not listed by Google blog search, however to be fair, I am a triple lower case letter z-lister.

    Guy

  52. Robert,
    To give you an answer to your last question, I posted at 08:37 am CST and I am still not listed by Google blog search, however to be fair, I am a triple lower case letter z-lister.

    Guy

  53. @21

    “One score and 14 years ago, a great American — Al Gore – in whose symbolic shadow we surf today, invented the Internet. This momentous invention came as a great beacon light of hope to millions anonymous men and women commenters who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their anonymity.

    But 34 year later, the anonymous commenter still is not free. 34 years later, the life of the anonymous commenter is still sadly crippled by the manacles of ridicule and the chains of judgementalism. 34 years later, the anonymous commenter lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of blogs. 34 years later, the anonymous commenter is still languishing in the corners of the internet and finds himself an exile the blogosphere….

    It would be fatal for the blogosphere to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the anonymous commenter’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality… Those who hope that the anonymous commenter needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the blogoshpere returns to business as usual….

    “I have a dream that one day in the blogosphere of the internet the anonymous commenter and the A-list bloggers will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

    I have a dream that one day even the Scobleizer, a blog rife with conflict, sweltering with the heat of oppression of anonymous commenters, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

    I have a dream that all anonymous commenters will one day live in blogosphere where they will not be judged by the anonymity of their personas but by the content of their comments.

    I have a dream”

  54. @21

    “One score and 14 years ago, a great American — Al Gore – in whose symbolic shadow we surf today, invented the Internet. This momentous invention came as a great beacon light of hope to millions anonymous men and women commenters who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their anonymity.

    But 34 year later, the anonymous commenter still is not free. 34 years later, the life of the anonymous commenter is still sadly crippled by the manacles of ridicule and the chains of judgementalism. 34 years later, the anonymous commenter lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of blogs. 34 years later, the anonymous commenter is still languishing in the corners of the internet and finds himself an exile the blogosphere….

    It would be fatal for the blogosphere to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the anonymous commenter’s legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality… Those who hope that the anonymous commenter needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the blogoshpere returns to business as usual….

    “I have a dream that one day in the blogosphere of the internet the anonymous commenter and the A-list bloggers will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

    I have a dream that one day even the Scobleizer, a blog rife with conflict, sweltering with the heat of oppression of anonymous commenters, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

    I have a dream that all anonymous commenters will one day live in blogosphere where they will not be judged by the anonymity of their personas but by the content of their comments.

    I have a dream”

  55. I agree Robert. Here is what your credibility is:

    You’re a sell-out whose once valued opinions have now been corrupted by greed and ego.

    I also agree that you have blown a “wad” of credibility over the last 4 days, but do you plan on learning from it at all or just continue saying, “I have more credibility than you cause I have this big blog and I am a big man”?

  56. I agree Robert. Here is what your credibility is:

    You’re a sell-out whose once valued opinions have now been corrupted by greed and ego.

    I also agree that you have blown a “wad” of credibility over the last 4 days, but do you plan on learning from it at all or just continue saying, “I have more credibility than you cause I have this big blog and I am a big man”?

  57. This is actually surprising to me–since my opinion when Google first overwhelmed me with blog results in my news alerts (without telling me first!) was that Google’s blogsearch picks up a lot more of the fake blogs and spam than did technorati. It’s clear they’re learning how important it is to improve…and remain the top search engine for everything.

  58. This is actually surprising to me–since my opinion when Google first overwhelmed me with blog results in my news alerts (without telling me first!) was that Google’s blogsearch picks up a lot more of the fake blogs and spam than did technorati. It’s clear they’re learning how important it is to improve…and remain the top search engine for everything.

  59. MLK @ 33,
    So you feel that pesonal attacks on somebody should be done in the shadows and not out in the open. If I wanted to use the same inane tatics as some commenters use here, you would not have a problem with some obscure writer calling you and your believe not only wrong and stupid but that you are a complete imbicle for being alive.

    Personaly, I want to face my accuser and let him/her know what I think about their comments.

    Guy

  60. MLK @ 33,
    So you feel that pesonal attacks on somebody should be done in the shadows and not out in the open. If I wanted to use the same inane tatics as some commenters use here, you would not have a problem with some obscure writer calling you and your believe not only wrong and stupid but that you are a complete imbicle for being alive.

    Personaly, I want to face my accuser and let him/her know what I think about their comments.

    Guy

  61. #36.. Actually, no I wouldn’t have a problem. I’m secure enough in my positions and opinions that I feel confident I can defend them without needing to resort to ad hominem attacks regarding the commenter. I can separate the message from the messenger and would not feel threatened by their anonymity. I’ve found that generally those that feel “attacked” by anonymous comments are insecure in their positions and feel threatened when needing to defend them.

  62. #36.. Actually, no I wouldn’t have a problem. I’m secure enough in my positions and opinions that I feel confident I can defend them without needing to resort to ad hominem attacks regarding the commenter. I can separate the message from the messenger and would not feel threatened by their anonymity. I’ve found that generally those that feel “attacked” by anonymous comments are insecure in their positions and feel threatened when needing to defend them.

  63. Robert,

    You ask what’s up with Technorati? I don’t know. I do notice though, that the XHTML markup on this page contains a LOT of errors. It’s just possible that these errors in the XHTML are confusing the Technorati spiders when they try to parse your blog.

    That’s probably not the reason, but you never know. Check out the errors in the markup here:

    http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fscobleizer.com%2F&charset=%28detect+automatically%29&doctype=Inline

  64. Robert,

    You ask what’s up with Technorati? I don’t know. I do notice though, that the XHTML markup on this page contains a LOT of errors. It’s just possible that these errors in the XHTML are confusing the Technorati spiders when they try to parse your blog.

    That’s probably not the reason, but you never know. Check out the errors in the markup here:

    http://validator.w3.org/check?uri=http%3A%2F%2Fscobleizer.com%2F&charset=%28detect+automatically%29&doctype=Inline

  65. Robert,

    You can click sorted by date to get the latest stuff. You can also use the “published” links on the left side of the page. If you last hour or last 12 hours, you’ll get recent stuff, too.

  66. Robert,

    You can click sorted by date to get the latest stuff. You can also use the “published” links on the left side of the page. If you last hour or last 12 hours, you’ll get recent stuff, too.

  67. Hey Bro … you know who Frank is. He is the a-hole we shot bottle rockets at in the 3rd grade. This is his anonymous way of getting back at you. Have fun this weekend.

  68. Hey Bro … you know who Frank is. He is the a-hole we shot bottle rockets at in the 3rd grade. This is his anonymous way of getting back at you. Have fun this weekend.

  69. Wow Scoble, I didn’t think you could come over as much of an ass as you did the past couple of days but you’ve gone even further and exceeded all expectations.

    Just because his questions rumble you a little bit, you have to act like an ass and start shooting off that he should tell you who he works for and his background. Not everyone has to have a blog to make a valid point! You need to get that into your head. It’s almost as if somebody’s arguements become invalid unless they give you their background info.

    Are you like this when you meet people in real life? You might be dropping your kid off at school and get speaking to another kid’s parents – all of a sudden a siren goes off in Scoble’s head and a voice inside him says “You’ve gotta find out the background of these people before any of what they said is true!! Quick get their web address”

    Do you actually become friends with anyone if they don’t have a site?

  70. Wow Scoble, I didn’t think you could come over as much of an ass as you did the past couple of days but you’ve gone even further and exceeded all expectations.

    Just because his questions rumble you a little bit, you have to act like an ass and start shooting off that he should tell you who he works for and his background. Not everyone has to have a blog to make a valid point! You need to get that into your head. It’s almost as if somebody’s arguements become invalid unless they give you their background info.

    Are you like this when you meet people in real life? You might be dropping your kid off at school and get speaking to another kid’s parents – all of a sudden a siren goes off in Scoble’s head and a voice inside him says “You’ve gotta find out the background of these people before any of what they said is true!! Quick get their web address”

    Do you actually become friends with anyone if they don’t have a site?

  71. I picked a few topics and ran through the various searches listed here (some combinations of scientific, numerical, ruby, molecular dynamics) and technorati was by far the worst, including several that were totally irrelevant. The others were more or less the same.

    I would also say that the engine that processes things faster is not necessarily better than one that takes a little longer (and for me, a day or two is a little longer). It is one component, along with accuracy, signal to noise, and other things too. (Not that technorati does any better with those areas)

  72. I picked a few topics and ran through the various searches listed here (some combinations of scientific, numerical, ruby, molecular dynamics) and technorati was by far the worst, including several that were totally irrelevant. The others were more or less the same.

    I would also say that the engine that processes things faster is not necessarily better than one that takes a little longer (and for me, a day or two is a little longer). It is one component, along with accuracy, signal to noise, and other things too. (Not that technorati does any better with those areas)

  73. Robert,

    Very strange. Thanks for your honest and appraisal of Technorati search, sorry we failed you. I’m looking into what’s up right now. In our regular tests, we consistently show greater consistency, completeness, and less spam, but clearly we’re missing something big here.

    Thanks again for your criticism and feedback. We’ll be working harder to figure out what’s going on, and to win you back…

    Dave

  74. Robert,

    Very strange. Thanks for your honest and appraisal of Technorati search, sorry we failed you. I’m looking into what’s up right now. In our regular tests, we consistently show greater consistency, completeness, and less spam, but clearly we’re missing something big here.

    Thanks again for your criticism and feedback. We’ll be working harder to figure out what’s going on, and to win you back…

    Dave

  75. Robert:

    Interesting, but how big of search sample is that? 1 search?! How can you make such calls after running *1* search???? Make a hundred, or a thousand, please.

    Also, you didn’t mention pinging. Are you sure you (or your blog platform or hosting service) pings Technorati or Pingomatic or blo.gs or … when you publish a post?
    Maybe Google is preemptively refetching your blog, while Technorati listens for pings?

  76. Robert:

    Interesting, but how big of search sample is that? 1 search?! How can you make such calls after running *1* search???? Make a hundred, or a thousand, please.

    Also, you didn’t mention pinging. Are you sure you (or your blog platform or hosting service) pings Technorati or Pingomatic or blo.gs or … when you publish a post?
    Maybe Google is preemptively refetching your blog, while Technorati listens for pings?

  77. Robert:

    I see a LOT of relevant and timely posts about Segate here: http://www.technorati.com/search/Seagate

    Maybe just this part is the problem:
    “Not only did it have my article first, but it had Jon Fortt’s article on DAVE first too.”

    Is this really the right measure of quality?

    Try this one, too:
    http://www.technorati.com/search/Seagate+AND+DAVE

    Again, looks like a lot of very relevant and fresh content.

    Have you tried pinging Technorati? Maybe your ping somehow didn’t make it there. I think the URL to go to is http://www.technorati.com/ping

  78. Robert:

    I see a LOT of relevant and timely posts about Segate here: http://www.technorati.com/search/Seagate

    Maybe just this part is the problem:
    “Not only did it have my article first, but it had Jon Fortt’s article on DAVE first too.”

    Is this really the right measure of quality?

    Try this one, too:
    http://www.technorati.com/search/Seagate+AND+DAVE

    Again, looks like a lot of very relevant and fresh content.

    Have you tried pinging Technorati? Maybe your ping somehow didn’t make it there. I think the URL to go to is http://www.technorati.com/ping

  79. Petko: You missed the point of blog search which is speed. For the first three hours Technorati didn’t show a single “DAVE” link. Google and Ask showed a bunch.

  80. Petko: You missed the point of blog search which is speed. For the first three hours Technorati didn’t show a single “DAVE” link. Google and Ask showed a bunch.

  81. Petko: it’s not my blog I was tracking. I was tracking all the other blogs.

    And this isn’t the first search I’ve done a comparison on. I’ve noticed that Google is better on a whole range of searches lately.

  82. Petko: it’s not my blog I was tracking. I was tracking all the other blogs.

    And this isn’t the first search I’ve done a comparison on. I’ve noticed that Google is better on a whole range of searches lately.

  83. Robert:
    How deep in the search results did you dig?
    Perhaps Technorati indexed it way before Googleboys and indexed a number of posts after the one you were looking for, which would put the target post further back in the search results.

    How can you be sure those other blogs pinged Technorati?
    If they didn’t, it’s no wonder Technorati didn’t know they published something new. Like I said, maybe Google practively crawls blogs, like it crawls non-blogs. Technorati doesn’t do that currently.

    Do blogs whose posts you didn’t find publish valid feeds? I mean, valid RSS or Atom format? Sites often mess this up, and if this was a case of an invalid format, maybe Google’s feed parser is more forgiving than Technorati’s.

    There are a lot of factors here, a lot of possible problems, and they are not all on the blog search engine end, so one should be careful pointing fingers without having analyzed all the possibilities.

  84. Robert:
    How deep in the search results did you dig?
    Perhaps Technorati indexed it way before Googleboys and indexed a number of posts after the one you were looking for, which would put the target post further back in the search results.

    How can you be sure those other blogs pinged Technorati?
    If they didn’t, it’s no wonder Technorati didn’t know they published something new. Like I said, maybe Google practively crawls blogs, like it crawls non-blogs. Technorati doesn’t do that currently.

    Do blogs whose posts you didn’t find publish valid feeds? I mean, valid RSS or Atom format? Sites often mess this up, and if this was a case of an invalid format, maybe Google’s feed parser is more forgiving than Technorati’s.

    There are a lot of factors here, a lot of possible problems, and they are not all on the blog search engine end, so one should be careful pointing fingers without having analyzed all the possibilities.

  85. Petko: Technorati shows the newest posts first. I watched it from the time the news broke. You don’t understand how blog search works. It works FAR different than Google’s main search engine.

    The thing is, the results are pretty consistent.

    They were demonstratable the same way last summer at Gnomedex.

    I’ll do it again when we have a news event I know about and can watch.

    Why don’t you do your own tests?

  86. Petko: Technorati shows the newest posts first. I watched it from the time the news broke. You don’t understand how blog search works. It works FAR different than Google’s main search engine.

    The thing is, the results are pretty consistent.

    They were demonstratable the same way last summer at Gnomedex.

    I’ll do it again when we have a news event I know about and can watch.

    Why don’t you do your own tests?

  87. Robert:
    I’m just trying to help. I know how blog search engines work pretty well, actually. I do that for living.

    You are saying you watched results from the moment the news broke. Good, then, if you really watched them from that exact moment on, you didn’t miss it.

    This still doesn’t mean that the source of the news *pinged* either Technorati or one of the ping servers. That is how blog search engines know they need to go and refetch a certain blog’s feed. Like I said, Google may be using the regular web search engine practices and maybe it’s going out and refetching known feeds on its own, without being pinged. You didn’t address this in your reply above.
    Whether Technorati and other blog search engines should be doing that or not is up for discussion. What do you think? Should Technorati and others (also) practively fetch blogs without waiting to be pinged?

    I actually did run some tests and analyzed top 10 Google Blog search engine results for the search “Seagate”. I didn’t write down the exact numbers, but I discovered that, at the time I run the search:

    - 1 hit was a hardware store in Australia – not a blog
    - 1 hit was on digg.com – not a blog
    - 4 or 5 hits were forums/bulletin boards – not blogs
    - the remaining 3-4 were blogs, one of which had a completely messed up RSS feed

    I didn’t check Technorati’s results, but the above tells me that Google might be good on speed and quantity, but not on quality, at least when it comes to its blog search. Would you agree?

    Did you analyze Technorati’s or Google’s results for qulity or did you only look for that one missing post for that one search for “Seagate”?

  88. Robert:
    I’m just trying to help. I know how blog search engines work pretty well, actually. I do that for living.

    You are saying you watched results from the moment the news broke. Good, then, if you really watched them from that exact moment on, you didn’t miss it.

    This still doesn’t mean that the source of the news *pinged* either Technorati or one of the ping servers. That is how blog search engines know they need to go and refetch a certain blog’s feed. Like I said, Google may be using the regular web search engine practices and maybe it’s going out and refetching known feeds on its own, without being pinged. You didn’t address this in your reply above.
    Whether Technorati and other blog search engines should be doing that or not is up for discussion. What do you think? Should Technorati and others (also) practively fetch blogs without waiting to be pinged?

    I actually did run some tests and analyzed top 10 Google Blog search engine results for the search “Seagate”. I didn’t write down the exact numbers, but I discovered that, at the time I run the search:

    - 1 hit was a hardware store in Australia – not a blog
    - 1 hit was on digg.com – not a blog
    - 4 or 5 hits were forums/bulletin boards – not blogs
    - the remaining 3-4 were blogs, one of which had a completely messed up RSS feed

    I didn’t check Technorati’s results, but the above tells me that Google might be good on speed and quantity, but not on quality, at least when it comes to its blog search. Would you agree?

    Did you analyze Technorati’s or Google’s results for qulity or did you only look for that one missing post for that one search for “Seagate”?

  89. You’re right: Technorati sucks. Their spidering/indexing/updating is inexplicable. Legit Blogs get removed with no warning. There’s no rhyme or reason. You can’t count on indexing or updates or consistency of any kind.

    I’ve completely given up on searching technorati tags now and only search through google blogs — google blog search results have been more precise and far more useful. But google has its own drawbacks, although the dinosaur speed of technorati does not seem to be one of them.

    good article. thanks

  90. You’re right: Technorati sucks. Their spidering/indexing/updating is inexplicable. Legit Blogs get removed with no warning. There’s no rhyme or reason. You can’t count on indexing or updates or consistency of any kind.

    I’ve completely given up on searching technorati tags now and only search through google blogs — google blog search results have been more precise and far more useful. But google has its own drawbacks, although the dinosaur speed of technorati does not seem to be one of them.

    good article. thanks