Comparing blog search engines for Seagate news

OK, let’s look again at blog search engines. It’s been just about an hour since Seagate’s news went up. So, let’s compare blog search engines and see how they are doing.

Google Blog Search for Seagate (note, this is different than the “main” Google engine — also, you have to click “sorted by date” to get the latest stuff).
IceRocket for Seagate.
Sphere for Seagate.
Technorati for Seagate.
Ask for Seagate.

Sorry guys. Google is just trouncing you here. Not only did it have my article first, but it had Jon Fortt’s article on DAVE first too.

Google’s blog search also has less noise. My second favorite? It’s Ask. It had both my article and Gizmodo’s mention of it last night.

Technorati? Dave Sifry, what’s going on? Your engine is looking worse and worse as time goes along. I find that I’m using Technorati less and less as time goes along too. Nothing about DAVE is up on Technorati yet. In fact, I wonder if Technorati is even indexing my blog anymore?

Not a good performance at all for Technorati. If a big company (two, actually) are already beating a startup on speed and quality (they are) then the startup is toast.

Why are blog search engines important? Because it’s how everyone from political campaigns to corporate officers inside places like Seagate listen to what the bloggers are saying about them.

If a blog search engine isn’t up to the minute then the people who use that engine are at a disadvantage to people who are using another engine. It’s why I can link out to interesting stuff about Seagate before other bloggers wake up.

Oh, and it’s also a way I can keep track of who’s linking or not. :-)

One thing I don’t like about Google’s blog search is that it defaults to “sort by relevance.” I far prefer the “Sorted by date” option (you have to click that on the top right side of the page to get it to show you the newest stuff it found).

How long does it take your blog about Seagate to get into the blog search engines?

UPDATE: It’s now 6:12 a.m. — more than two hours since announcement — and Technorati still doesn’t have a single mention of DAVE. It doesn’t even have Gizmodo’s mention of Seagate that was posted last night. If Technorati isn’t getting Gizmodo into its index, what hope does any other blogger have of getting into Technorati. Google actually has improved over the past two hours, while Technorati has gotten worse. And people wonder why I’m a Google fan…

109 thoughts on “Comparing blog search engines for Seagate news

  1. You’re right: Technorati sucks. Their spidering/indexing/updating is inexplicable. Legit Blogs get removed with no warning. There’s no rhyme or reason. You can’t count on indexing or updates or consistency of any kind.

    I’ve completely given up on searching technorati tags now and only search through google blogs — google blog search results have been more precise and far more useful. But google has its own drawbacks, although the dinosaur speed of technorati does not seem to be one of them.

    good article. thanks

  2. You’re right: Technorati sucks. Their spidering/indexing/updating is inexplicable. Legit Blogs get removed with no warning. There’s no rhyme or reason. You can’t count on indexing or updates or consistency of any kind.

    I’ve completely given up on searching technorati tags now and only search through google blogs — google blog search results have been more precise and far more useful. But google has its own drawbacks, although the dinosaur speed of technorati does not seem to be one of them.

    good article. thanks

  3. Robert:
    I’m just trying to help. I know how blog search engines work pretty well, actually. I do that for living.

    You are saying you watched results from the moment the news broke. Good, then, if you really watched them from that exact moment on, you didn’t miss it.

    This still doesn’t mean that the source of the news *pinged* either Technorati or one of the ping servers. That is how blog search engines know they need to go and refetch a certain blog’s feed. Like I said, Google may be using the regular web search engine practices and maybe it’s going out and refetching known feeds on its own, without being pinged. You didn’t address this in your reply above.
    Whether Technorati and other blog search engines should be doing that or not is up for discussion. What do you think? Should Technorati and others (also) practively fetch blogs without waiting to be pinged?

    I actually did run some tests and analyzed top 10 Google Blog search engine results for the search “Seagate”. I didn’t write down the exact numbers, but I discovered that, at the time I run the search:

    - 1 hit was a hardware store in Australia – not a blog
    - 1 hit was on digg.com – not a blog
    - 4 or 5 hits were forums/bulletin boards – not blogs
    - the remaining 3-4 were blogs, one of which had a completely messed up RSS feed

    I didn’t check Technorati’s results, but the above tells me that Google might be good on speed and quantity, but not on quality, at least when it comes to its blog search. Would you agree?

    Did you analyze Technorati’s or Google’s results for qulity or did you only look for that one missing post for that one search for “Seagate”?

  4. Robert:
    I’m just trying to help. I know how blog search engines work pretty well, actually. I do that for living.

    You are saying you watched results from the moment the news broke. Good, then, if you really watched them from that exact moment on, you didn’t miss it.

    This still doesn’t mean that the source of the news *pinged* either Technorati or one of the ping servers. That is how blog search engines know they need to go and refetch a certain blog’s feed. Like I said, Google may be using the regular web search engine practices and maybe it’s going out and refetching known feeds on its own, without being pinged. You didn’t address this in your reply above.
    Whether Technorati and other blog search engines should be doing that or not is up for discussion. What do you think? Should Technorati and others (also) practively fetch blogs without waiting to be pinged?

    I actually did run some tests and analyzed top 10 Google Blog search engine results for the search “Seagate”. I didn’t write down the exact numbers, but I discovered that, at the time I run the search:

    - 1 hit was a hardware store in Australia – not a blog
    - 1 hit was on digg.com – not a blog
    - 4 or 5 hits were forums/bulletin boards – not blogs
    - the remaining 3-4 were blogs, one of which had a completely messed up RSS feed

    I didn’t check Technorati’s results, but the above tells me that Google might be good on speed and quantity, but not on quality, at least when it comes to its blog search. Would you agree?

    Did you analyze Technorati’s or Google’s results for qulity or did you only look for that one missing post for that one search for “Seagate”?

  5. Petko: Technorati shows the newest posts first. I watched it from the time the news broke. You don’t understand how blog search works. It works FAR different than Google’s main search engine.

    The thing is, the results are pretty consistent.

    They were demonstratable the same way last summer at Gnomedex.

    I’ll do it again when we have a news event I know about and can watch.

    Why don’t you do your own tests?

  6. Petko: Technorati shows the newest posts first. I watched it from the time the news broke. You don’t understand how blog search works. It works FAR different than Google’s main search engine.

    The thing is, the results are pretty consistent.

    They were demonstratable the same way last summer at Gnomedex.

    I’ll do it again when we have a news event I know about and can watch.

    Why don’t you do your own tests?

  7. Robert:
    How deep in the search results did you dig?
    Perhaps Technorati indexed it way before Googleboys and indexed a number of posts after the one you were looking for, which would put the target post further back in the search results.

    How can you be sure those other blogs pinged Technorati?
    If they didn’t, it’s no wonder Technorati didn’t know they published something new. Like I said, maybe Google practively crawls blogs, like it crawls non-blogs. Technorati doesn’t do that currently.

    Do blogs whose posts you didn’t find publish valid feeds? I mean, valid RSS or Atom format? Sites often mess this up, and if this was a case of an invalid format, maybe Google’s feed parser is more forgiving than Technorati’s.

    There are a lot of factors here, a lot of possible problems, and they are not all on the blog search engine end, so one should be careful pointing fingers without having analyzed all the possibilities.

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