More train photos

The second part of Photowalking, Train Museum edition, with Thomas Hawk is up.

Of all the 140+ videos I’ve done so far, I love Photowalking the most. What about you?

Oh, you get to see my son, the Apple geek, in part of this video. Oh, and the first Apple employee to appear on ScobleShow too!

You can see all of Thomas Hawk’s photos from this shoot linked off of his post on his blog.

[podtech content=http://media1.podtech.net/media/2007/02/PID_010151/Podtech_ScobleShow_Photowalking5_pt2.flv&postURL=http://www.podtech.net/scobleshow/technology/1352/photowalking-5-thomas-hawk-takes-us-around-sacramento-train-museum-part-ii&totalTime=2050000&breadcrumb=3F34K2L1]

Comments

  1. Very neat Photo shots!!! I am always amazed at the total lack of knowledge displayed by some of our history, yet awled by their expertise in other areas.
    I believe the adage “Different Strokes” applies. We live in such a huge diverse society anymore that it is impossible to have even a slight working knowledge of all areas of interest. Perhaps someday in the distant future some visitor to a museum will be looked at todays technology and wonder about the lives of those persons that dealt with it on a day to day excistance. I for one seriously miss my spell checker. I would love to visit the Museum shown. Your trip, video and photos are great. I would be visiting though from a personal love of “Railroad Lore”, rail history has always been a great part of my life and now perhaps you too will want to go a bit further and learn more of our past.

  2. Very neat Photo shots!!! I am always amazed at the total lack of knowledge displayed by some of our history, yet awled by their expertise in other areas.
    I believe the adage “Different Strokes” applies. We live in such a huge diverse society anymore that it is impossible to have even a slight working knowledge of all areas of interest. Perhaps someday in the distant future some visitor to a museum will be looked at todays technology and wonder about the lives of those persons that dealt with it on a day to day excistance. I for one seriously miss my spell checker. I would love to visit the Museum shown. Your trip, video and photos are great. I would be visiting though from a personal love of “Railroad Lore”, rail history has always been a great part of my life and now perhaps you too will want to go a bit further and learn more of our past.

  3. I love the photowalks and I think this one is the best so far. Anyways, I just wanted to comment on the size of your embedded player, it seems a little too small to me.

  4. I love the photowalks and I think this one is the best so far. Anyways, I just wanted to comment on the size of your embedded player, it seems a little too small to me.

  5. I have been sharing your photowalking podcasts with my girlfriend and her dad (who both shoot weddings and candid children’s photos). I know they are invaluable, as I sometimes take her Nikon out after I’m done watching Thomas mosey around just so I can play around with his suggestions.

    Just as I was starting to get her interested, you released the Heather Champ walk (A video that I knew she would love, as she is really into polaroids and film photography). So, we sat there watching, hoping to get some cool polaroid techniques.

    I have to say that video totally killed my master plan to get her tuned into some of the great resources the web has to offer. I was counting on Heather to not only take some cool shots with a polaroid, but also to entice my girlfriend into playing around with Flickr. Unfortunately, she did neither. We spent the whole time sitting there wondering if she was ever going to snap one off.

    You really need to get Heather on again. I can check out her polaroids anytime on her site, but I’d love to learn more about how she gets good, crisp images. I’m already taking her suggestion and looking around for a SX-70 (which was worth watching the video for me), but I absolutely need to see something from her.

    Does she shake her polaroids? Does she get film cheap somewhere? Where does she put all the photos in her house? Can she take just one picture so you can call it photowalking and not holdingapolaroidwalking?

  6. I have been sharing your photowalking podcasts with my girlfriend and her dad (who both shoot weddings and candid children’s photos). I know they are invaluable, as I sometimes take her Nikon out after I’m done watching Thomas mosey around just so I can play around with his suggestions.

    Just as I was starting to get her interested, you released the Heather Champ walk (A video that I knew she would love, as she is really into polaroids and film photography). So, we sat there watching, hoping to get some cool polaroid techniques.

    I have to say that video totally killed my master plan to get her tuned into some of the great resources the web has to offer. I was counting on Heather to not only take some cool shots with a polaroid, but also to entice my girlfriend into playing around with Flickr. Unfortunately, she did neither. We spent the whole time sitting there wondering if she was ever going to snap one off.

    You really need to get Heather on again. I can check out her polaroids anytime on her site, but I’d love to learn more about how she gets good, crisp images. I’m already taking her suggestion and looking around for a SX-70 (which was worth watching the video for me), but I absolutely need to see something from her.

    Does she shake her polaroids? Does she get film cheap somewhere? Where does she put all the photos in her house? Can she take just one picture so you can call it photowalking and not holdingapolaroidwalking?

  7. John: do you write the National Football League and say “can you edit the SuperBowl down to two minutes?”

    Photowalking is about the process of making photographs. If you don’t care about photography you won’t care if this is five minutes, or 15, or 80. If you do care, you’ll find a way to carve out the time.

    Jacob: I actually agree with you. While the segment was really great, I was hoping to see more photography made. But I think Thomas sets such a high bar here. In 80 minutes he usually makes about 800 images with somewhere between 50 and 100 really good ones.

  8. John: do you write the National Football League and say “can you edit the SuperBowl down to two minutes?”

    Photowalking is about the process of making photographs. If you don’t care about photography you won’t care if this is five minutes, or 15, or 80. If you do care, you’ll find a way to carve out the time.

    Jacob: I actually agree with you. While the segment was really great, I was hoping to see more photography made. But I think Thomas sets such a high bar here. In 80 minutes he usually makes about 800 images with somewhere between 50 and 100 really good ones.

  9. Robert:
    Excellent point. I’m not sure how much exposure Heather had to the photowalking series before she was on it, but I imagine if she had seen any episodes, she would have been more keen on snapping photos. That or, like my girlfriend, she gets flack from her husband about buying $20 film cartridges ;)

  10. Robert:
    Excellent point. I’m not sure how much exposure Heather had to the photowalking series before she was on it, but I imagine if she had seen any episodes, she would have been more keen on snapping photos. That or, like my girlfriend, she gets flack from her husband about buying $20 film cartridges ;)

  11. Robert:
    That sounds excellent. What’s the status on making your videos iPod ready? I know I couldn’t watch on my iPod a few months ago. These would be really great to go along with Ze and Diggnation during my drive to work.

  12. Robert:
    That sounds excellent. What’s the status on making your videos iPod ready? I know I couldn’t watch on my iPod a few months ago. These would be really great to go along with Ze and Diggnation during my drive to work.

  13. Jacob: they should be viewable on iPods now. There’s an iPod link on each page and it should give you a video that works. Let me know if it doesn’t and what kind of iPod you have.

  14. Jacob: they should be viewable on iPods now. There’s an iPod link on each page and it should give you a video that works. Let me know if it doesn’t and what kind of iPod you have.

  15. Hi Robert:
    I heard you say you’ve thought about renting a pano camera to get a panorama of the train. It turns out that you don’t need a special camera to make panoramas. You can do it with your SLR and the Photomerge feature in Photoshop. Try putting your camera on a tripod and shooting a series of shots that overlap by about 30%. Then let Photoshop stitch them together (File>Automate>Photomerge). It’s awesome.

  16. Hi Robert:
    I heard you say you’ve thought about renting a pano camera to get a panorama of the train. It turns out that you don’t need a special camera to make panoramas. You can do it with your SLR and the Photomerge feature in Photoshop. Try putting your camera on a tripod and shooting a series of shots that overlap by about 30%. Then let Photoshop stitch them together (File>Automate>Photomerge). It’s awesome.

  17. WOW Love the photo walk—and will pass along!

    A new book is out by Kenneth and Mary Lou Reed about Railroad History. They worked real hard on the book and I love it.

    The book is a collection of some of Kenneth’s experiences as a fireman on the Evansville, Indianapolis and Terre Haute line of the New York Central Railroad. I started firing steam engines when I was 18 years old in 1953. It is also a compilation of writings and history of the Evansville and Indianapolis Railroad.

    To learn more go to:

    http://www.klreed.com/

    Thanks Deborah

  18. WOW Love the photo walk—and will pass along!

    A new book is out by Kenneth and Mary Lou Reed about Railroad History. They worked real hard on the book and I love it.

    The book is a collection of some of Kenneth’s experiences as a fireman on the Evansville, Indianapolis and Terre Haute line of the New York Central Railroad. I started firing steam engines when I was 18 years old in 1953. It is also a compilation of writings and history of the Evansville and Indianapolis Railroad.

    To learn more go to:

    http://www.klreed.com/

    Thanks Deborah