I was wrong about “NoFollow”

I was a supporter of the nofollow link, which told search engines not to count that link in their popularity ranking algorithms.

But, after seeing Loren Baker’s post about how lame nofollow is, I find I’m changing my mind.

I’m very concerned, for instance, about Wikipedia’s use of nofollow. More and more of my friends say they now go to Wikipedia to search first before going to Google. Imagine a world where Wikipedia could lock Google out of key information. Wouldn’t it be ironic that something that Google invented could actually be used against it?

That said, I don’t go for the point that comment links should be judged by search engines the same as links in a blog. That sounds really elitist, I know, but I’m seeing all sorts of gaming going on in comments and it’s a lot easier to build authoritative Webs in blogs than in comments.

84 thoughts on “I was wrong about “NoFollow”

  1. Not entirely true. They DO generally follow the links (so the page gets indexed) but the page gets no credit for the link to it. As google heavily use incoming links to influence the search position and key words, these nofollow links provide no help in this way.

    However, the page still gets indexed, so unique content may make it show up in google, and some search engines ignore the nofollow attribute anyway.

    If you want a search engine not to follow any links in the page you have to use it in robots or the header.

  2. I think the interesting part, google makes this job unknown so we dont know exactly what is happening.. if google is counting or not.. is nofollow links work for someting or not.. so there is always a hope :)

  3. I think the interesting part, google makes this job unknown so we dont know exactly what is happening.. if google is counting or not.. is nofollow links work for someting or not.. so there is always a hope :)

  4. I do-follow links now on my Aussie housewife blog. After a long time procrastinating I have seen the importance of dofollow and using the “do follow” principal to help keep the Internet better connected. http://www.reallyreally.net – Take a look at my dofollow blog and feel free to comment. Thank you, Regards Bree.

  5. I do-follow links now on my Aussie housewife blog. After a long time procrastinating I have seen the importance of dofollow and using the “do follow” principal to help keep the Internet better connected. http://www.reallyreally.net – Take a look at my dofollow blog and feel free to comment. Thank you, Regards Bree.

  6. Thanks for very interesting article. btw. I really enjoyed reading all of your posts. It’s interesting to read ideas, and observations from someone else’s point of view… makes you think more. So please keep up the great work. Greetings.

  7. Thanks for very interesting article. btw. I really enjoyed reading all of your posts. It’s interesting to read ideas, and observations from someone else’s point of view… makes you think more. So please keep up the great work. Greetings.

  8. On WordPress.com Robert wouldn’t be able to make an editorial decision to make that link live, because all links are nofollow in comments.
    The same is true for default wordpress.org blogs and MT, Typepad, Blogger.com etc etc

    I have links posted frequently in my comments that are highly relevant to the conversation on that post, but don’t warrant a separate post that will end up in all my readers feeds.

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