Comments

  1. Hey Robert, Schematic will be a sponsor of Mix07. We’ve been doing lots of work for Microsoft and other clients on platforms like Media Center, WPF, WPF/E and more.

    I’ll be there in Vegas along with lots of our crew, and we’d love to get together and show you some of the stuff we’ve been working on. Drop a line if you’re interested.

    –Matthew Rechs
    Chief Technology Officer
    Schematic
    http://www.schematic.com

  2. Hey Robert, Schematic will be a sponsor of Mix07. We’ve been doing lots of work for Microsoft and other clients on platforms like Media Center, WPF, WPF/E and more.

    I’ll be there in Vegas along with lots of our crew, and we’d love to get together and show you some of the stuff we’ve been working on. Drop a line if you’re interested.

    –Matthew Rechs
    Chief Technology Officer
    Schematic
    http://www.schematic.com

  3. Jeff’s org, oh, and well DPE in general is a complete waste of money, both in people and capital resources. Having been in and around that org for the past 5+ years I have yet to see anything useful come out. Now in the product group I see just how correct that statement is. PGs have no use for DPE, and zero respect for their work or opinion. And customers/partners and the field (aside from a few fan boys) have zero use for an org that flits in and out and has no direct or long term accountability to their success. The whole org (and their VP) need to just be blown up. Good people like Michael (don’t know him so I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt) if they are here just to do audience evangelism…should be in CMO and not sucking on the teat of a useless org.

  4. Jeff’s org, oh, and well DPE in general is a complete waste of money, both in people and capital resources. Having been in and around that org for the past 5+ years I have yet to see anything useful come out. Now in the product group I see just how correct that statement is. PGs have no use for DPE, and zero respect for their work or opinion. And customers/partners and the field (aside from a few fan boys) have zero use for an org that flits in and out and has no direct or long term accountability to their success. The whole org (and their VP) need to just be blown up. Good people like Michael (don’t know him so I’ll give him the benefit of the doubt) if they are here just to do audience evangelism…should be in CMO and not sucking on the teat of a useless org.

  5. “I firmly believe that Microsoft is the only company that will enable the seamless transition for users to move in and out of the different aspects of their lives.”

    I thought he was already working for the Borg. With such blinders who needs analysts!

  6. “I firmly believe that Microsoft is the only company that will enable the seamless transition for users to move in and out of the different aspects of their lives.”

    I thought he was already working for the Borg. With such blinders who needs analysts!

  7. No news: why don’t you sign your name to these posts? Obviously someone thinks that DPE is worth the investment.

    DPE plans the PDC. You saying THAT isn’t worth the investment? Really? Amazing. I guess if you’re an engineer or a product manager you believe that word will get out about your product without conferences, without blogs (have you read Tim Sneath’s blogging about WPF?) or without people like Eileen in the UK meeting with customers, visiting local user groups, etc.

    Well, let me know how that all works out.

  8. No news: why don’t you sign your name to these posts? Obviously someone thinks that DPE is worth the investment.

    DPE plans the PDC. You saying THAT isn’t worth the investment? Really? Amazing. I guess if you’re an engineer or a product manager you believe that word will get out about your product without conferences, without blogs (have you read Tim Sneath’s blogging about WPF?) or without people like Eileen in the UK meeting with customers, visiting local user groups, etc.

    Well, let me know how that all works out.

  9. We’ve done a lot of work with both DPE (Developer & Platform Evangelism) and with a bunch of product teams at Microsoft, and I think DPE is an outstanding organization. They bridge the gap between a totally revenue-focused enterprise sales team, and a roadmap-focused program manager. Our clients have found a lot of value in talking to people who have a deep understanding of the technology as well as the skills and experience to visualize real-world applications.

    –mjr

  10. We’ve done a lot of work with both DPE (Developer & Platform Evangelism) and with a bunch of product teams at Microsoft, and I think DPE is an outstanding organization. They bridge the gap between a totally revenue-focused enterprise sales team, and a roadmap-focused program manager. Our clients have found a lot of value in talking to people who have a deep understanding of the technology as well as the skills and experience to visualize real-world applications.

    –mjr

  11. DPE does have a fan-boy base of a handful of MVPs that are loyal (#6), but the ROI from that select few is really low.

    Events like PDC (where I have attended and spoken countless times) could be executed just as well by a core marketing org. There is nothing that DPE brings to the table that is extra special. As far as product groups marketing their stuff….well they do a good job with the budgets that they are given. Per head, DPE has a MUCH HIGHER allocation of budget that if it were redirected would be much better suited in the product group. DPE is just another layer of indirection to the product group. Product groups don’t give a Pri 3 crap about feedback from DPE, whereas if you gave the product group the heads and money and let their PMs hit the road or manage the events, you’d have a much more real and direct customer interaction and input into the product design. DPE, the spend, the people, the VP, and the charter is just FLAWED.

  12. DPE does have a fan-boy base of a handful of MVPs that are loyal (#6), but the ROI from that select few is really low.

    Events like PDC (where I have attended and spoken countless times) could be executed just as well by a core marketing org. There is nothing that DPE brings to the table that is extra special. As far as product groups marketing their stuff….well they do a good job with the budgets that they are given. Per head, DPE has a MUCH HIGHER allocation of budget that if it were redirected would be much better suited in the product group. DPE is just another layer of indirection to the product group. Product groups don’t give a Pri 3 crap about feedback from DPE, whereas if you gave the product group the heads and money and let their PMs hit the road or manage the events, you’d have a much more real and direct customer interaction and input into the product design. DPE, the spend, the people, the VP, and the charter is just FLAWED.

  13. Too bad about Gartenberg. I guess he decided he didn’t like having any credibility. Becoming a shill for Microsoft is an ideal way to sell out.

  14. Too bad about Gartenberg. I guess he decided he didn’t like having any credibility. Becoming a shill for Microsoft is an ideal way to sell out.

  15. Robert,

    I’m not knocking the new guy, but let’s ask ourselves the following:

    What exactly has Microsoft done in recent memory that even deserves the nomenclature “interesting”?

    MS is not excatly innovative in any meaningful way. Yeah, yeah, I know… your Channel 9 friends… and, there are some real good programmers at MS…

    Vista is NOT interesting beyond using it as an argument against the evil of consumer-targeted DRM. Vista should serve as a warning to everyone who values their digital freedom.

    Unfortunately, in the US, we Americans are letting corporations slowly set the stage for a complete and utter lack of anonymity and freedom where computers are concerned.

    I use Linux for the reason of freedom. Linux is not that interesting, either. I’m at least honest about this, but freedom is far more interesting than DRM.

    MS is the Cuba of operating systems. Linux is the wild west. I far prefer the wild west, thanks.

  16. Robert,

    I’m not knocking the new guy, but let’s ask ourselves the following:

    What exactly has Microsoft done in recent memory that even deserves the nomenclature “interesting”?

    MS is not excatly innovative in any meaningful way. Yeah, yeah, I know… your Channel 9 friends… and, there are some real good programmers at MS…

    Vista is NOT interesting beyond using it as an argument against the evil of consumer-targeted DRM. Vista should serve as a warning to everyone who values their digital freedom.

    Unfortunately, in the US, we Americans are letting corporations slowly set the stage for a complete and utter lack of anonymity and freedom where computers are concerned.

    I use Linux for the reason of freedom. Linux is not that interesting, either. I’m at least honest about this, but freedom is far more interesting than DRM.

    MS is the Cuba of operating systems. Linux is the wild west. I far prefer the wild west, thanks.

  17. Peter: Halo. Xbox. And everyday I see more and more Microsoft-based SmartPhones (I remember a day, just two years ago, when I was the only one who had one in my circle of non-microsoft friends).

    And Microsoft can ALWAYS do something innovative in business. I learned in 1998 never to bet against any company with billions of dollars in the bank.

    As for Linux. I bought a Macintosh. It can run Linux too, just like it can run Windows. :-)

  18. Peter: Halo. Xbox. And everyday I see more and more Microsoft-based SmartPhones (I remember a day, just two years ago, when I was the only one who had one in my circle of non-microsoft friends).

    And Microsoft can ALWAYS do something innovative in business. I learned in 1998 never to bet against any company with billions of dollars in the bank.

    As for Linux. I bought a Macintosh. It can run Linux too, just like it can run Windows. :-)

  19. @10. Those are all well and good, but Peter asked for “interesting”. What’s interesting about a bloated MS OS on a phone? What’s interesting about a console game compared to the plethora of other console FPS games on the market? WII games, today, are MUCH MORE compelling than Halo. Xbox? marginally interesting.

    In the vast inventory of MS products, Xbox, Smartphones and Halo is the best you can come up with?

  20. @10. Those are all well and good, but Peter asked for “interesting”. What’s interesting about a bloated MS OS on a phone? What’s interesting about a console game compared to the plethora of other console FPS games on the market? WII games, today, are MUCH MORE compelling than Halo. Xbox? marginally interesting.

    In the vast inventory of MS products, Xbox, Smartphones and Halo is the best you can come up with?

  21. What’s interesting? Hundreds of thousands of people stood in line around the globe for an Xbox a Christmas ago. Same for Halo 2, which was the largest selling game up to that point.

    I guess my definition for “interesting” in business is different than your definition. What do you find “interesting?”

    WII hasn’t sold as many units as Xbox 360 has yet. So, why do you think that is “interesting?”

    Regarding why I couldn’t come up with anything else that’s interesting? Cause I didn’t think I needed to list a whole catalog. His point was that he couldn’t think of anything interesting that Microsoft did. I poked at his point by providing a few examples.

  22. What’s interesting? Hundreds of thousands of people stood in line around the globe for an Xbox a Christmas ago. Same for Halo 2, which was the largest selling game up to that point.

    I guess my definition for “interesting” in business is different than your definition. What do you find “interesting?”

    WII hasn’t sold as many units as Xbox 360 has yet. So, why do you think that is “interesting?”

    Regarding why I couldn’t come up with anything else that’s interesting? Cause I didn’t think I needed to list a whole catalog. His point was that he couldn’t think of anything interesting that Microsoft did. I poked at his point by providing a few examples.

  23. Robert,

    The Xbox is NOT interesting. It’s just another console gaming system like all the rest. The differences between them are minimal. Wii hasn’t sold in huge numbers because it’s not been out long enough.

    Smart phones are NOT interesting. The VAST majority of people care about nothing but having cool ringtones, texting ability, and a decent and cheap service plan. It’s only nerds that care about smart dityphones. They are not interesting outside of geek circles.

    What I mean about interesting is something that’s truly different. The iPod was sort of interesting, since it was the first real mobile music player of any note since the original Walkman. The iPod is now a common item and is no longer interesting.

    Linux is interesting in that it is a disruptive technology. The GPL is interesting since it’s a viral license. The fact that MS has a problem with Linux and the GPL makes them even that much more interesting from a business perspective.

    The difference between us, Robert, is you are easily taken in by all the shiny new stuff on the Internet.

    Intersting is something like the Opera browser. Just a browser, yes, but the fact that they can get all that in such a little amount of space is amazing and a testament to their coding prowess. It is, sadly, not free/libre software, but kudos nonetheless.

    If MS is so good, why does their OS still suck? Why can’t they get a handle on security? It’s not that hard.

    Why is MS so opposed to a total re-write of their OS?
    MS’s problem is that they are concerned with supporting legacy crapola. They need to do what Apple did with OS X and just move on and re-write. Sure, Apple took a great deal of the code from the BSD projects, but at least they had the guts to do a new OS. MS will suffer horribly until they get away from the registry, active x, and dlls. They need to base their OS on some form of *nix. They won’t and you know why? They suffer from the “not invented here” complex. Their pride is why Linux and FreeBSD are killing MS in the server market year after year and getting worse for MS every year.

    I’ve been an IT security guy now for years, and I have nothing good to say about MS’s track record with security. Nothing interesting there.

    Don’t even give me that lame line that MS is the biggest target. May be, but with those billions in the bank, they should have the BEST products in the world. They don’t.

    I remember reading about one of the MS leaders (forget who) stating that until people are interested in paying for security, MS wasn’t all that interested in doing it. People did “pay” alright. They payed for Nimda, Code Red, and all they other nasties that MS was susceptible to and still is.

    Security is interesting, Robert, and MS has the worst track record in the industry in that regard.

  24. Robert,

    The Xbox is NOT interesting. It’s just another console gaming system like all the rest. The differences between them are minimal. Wii hasn’t sold in huge numbers because it’s not been out long enough.

    Smart phones are NOT interesting. The VAST majority of people care about nothing but having cool ringtones, texting ability, and a decent and cheap service plan. It’s only nerds that care about smart dityphones. They are not interesting outside of geek circles.

    What I mean about interesting is something that’s truly different. The iPod was sort of interesting, since it was the first real mobile music player of any note since the original Walkman. The iPod is now a common item and is no longer interesting.

    Linux is interesting in that it is a disruptive technology. The GPL is interesting since it’s a viral license. The fact that MS has a problem with Linux and the GPL makes them even that much more interesting from a business perspective.

    The difference between us, Robert, is you are easily taken in by all the shiny new stuff on the Internet.

    Intersting is something like the Opera browser. Just a browser, yes, but the fact that they can get all that in such a little amount of space is amazing and a testament to their coding prowess. It is, sadly, not free/libre software, but kudos nonetheless.

    If MS is so good, why does their OS still suck? Why can’t they get a handle on security? It’s not that hard.

    Why is MS so opposed to a total re-write of their OS?
    MS’s problem is that they are concerned with supporting legacy crapola. They need to do what Apple did with OS X and just move on and re-write. Sure, Apple took a great deal of the code from the BSD projects, but at least they had the guts to do a new OS. MS will suffer horribly until they get away from the registry, active x, and dlls. They need to base their OS on some form of *nix. They won’t and you know why? They suffer from the “not invented here” complex. Their pride is why Linux and FreeBSD are killing MS in the server market year after year and getting worse for MS every year.

    I’ve been an IT security guy now for years, and I have nothing good to say about MS’s track record with security. Nothing interesting there.

    Don’t even give me that lame line that MS is the biggest target. May be, but with those billions in the bank, they should have the BEST products in the world. They don’t.

    I remember reading about one of the MS leaders (forget who) stating that until people are interested in paying for security, MS wasn’t all that interested in doing it. People did “pay” alright. They payed for Nimda, Code Red, and all they other nasties that MS was susceptible to and still is.

    Security is interesting, Robert, and MS has the worst track record in the industry in that regard.

  25. @12 interesting that you note Xbox, phones and Halo as interesting. All areas that if they were stand alone businesses would be out of money (well except for Halo…God bless Halo 2). I agree they are interesting, but they certainly don’t define Microsoft nor are they the reason for the hoardes of cash.

    I’d be interested if any of the money makers are on your list…like the Ribbon in Office 2007, or SQL Server AS, etc.

  26. @12 interesting that you note Xbox, phones and Halo as interesting. All areas that if they were stand alone businesses would be out of money (well except for Halo…God bless Halo 2). I agree they are interesting, but they certainly don’t define Microsoft nor are they the reason for the hoardes of cash.

    I’d be interested if any of the money makers are on your list…like the Ribbon in Office 2007, or SQL Server AS, etc.

  27. “hires another interesting person”…everyone is interesting in some way. Your value judgements about what shiny new thing (or person) is or isn’t interesting is silly. I think that if you’d actually been at Microsoft for any longer than 10 minutes you’d have found a lot more interesting people…same of other companies.

    You know what’s interesting…capitalism. How many of the shiny gadgets you interview on your show will be around in two years…that’s an interesting metric you might want to track. Forget you filming them…tell us how much money you would invest in them (if you could). How about some disclosure, that would be interesting.

    Pretty bird, pretty bird

  28. “hires another interesting person”…everyone is interesting in some way. Your value judgements about what shiny new thing (or person) is or isn’t interesting is silly. I think that if you’d actually been at Microsoft for any longer than 10 minutes you’d have found a lot more interesting people…same of other companies.

    You know what’s interesting…capitalism. How many of the shiny gadgets you interview on your show will be around in two years…that’s an interesting metric you might want to track. Forget you filming them…tell us how much money you would invest in them (if you could). How about some disclosure, that would be interesting.

    Pretty bird, pretty bird

  29. @15,

    Capitalism is NOT interesting. Not in the least.

    Capitalism has some serious flaws, not the least of which is over 50 million Americans not having health insurance. That’s interesting.

    As rich as this country is, we could provide the BEST healthcare in the world for free to all people.

    I’m not interested in hearing about the woes of illegal aliens taking advantage of ERs. I want to know what we can do to provide people with free healthcare.

    If I had my way, all pharm companies, and doctors would be state employees. Doctors would then become doctors for the right reasons, not only the monetary incentives. Let’s pay teachers, police, and firefighters what doctors get paid since they actually risk their lives. That’s interesting.

    Capitalism has its good points, but when working people cannot even afford health insurance, that’s evil.

    Here’s the rub… I can see for paying for health insurance if it covers EVERYTHING. Co-pays should be illegal. Prescription drugs should be affordable by everyone, not just the middle and upper classes.

    Like Spock said, “the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.”

  30. @15,

    Capitalism is NOT interesting. Not in the least.

    Capitalism has some serious flaws, not the least of which is over 50 million Americans not having health insurance. That’s interesting.

    As rich as this country is, we could provide the BEST healthcare in the world for free to all people.

    I’m not interested in hearing about the woes of illegal aliens taking advantage of ERs. I want to know what we can do to provide people with free healthcare.

    If I had my way, all pharm companies, and doctors would be state employees. Doctors would then become doctors for the right reasons, not only the monetary incentives. Let’s pay teachers, police, and firefighters what doctors get paid since they actually risk their lives. That’s interesting.

    Capitalism has its good points, but when working people cannot even afford health insurance, that’s evil.

    Here’s the rub… I can see for paying for health insurance if it covers EVERYTHING. Co-pays should be illegal. Prescription drugs should be affordable by everyone, not just the middle and upper classes.

    Like Spock said, “the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.”

  31. “Hundreds of thousands of people stood in line around the globe for an Xbox a Christmas ago.”

    XBox has been an unmitigated financial disaster for MSFT, which has already sunk in billions into it that’ll likely be never recovered. What’s worst, MSFT hasn’t even learned a lesson: after trying for nearly five years to beat the tiny Apple, the collective intelligence of all those “smart” people at MSFT gave us what? Zune! And screwed the lot of its “partners” in the process. Yeah, that’s really interesting.

  32. “Hundreds of thousands of people stood in line around the globe for an Xbox a Christmas ago.”

    XBox has been an unmitigated financial disaster for MSFT, which has already sunk in billions into it that’ll likely be never recovered. What’s worst, MSFT hasn’t even learned a lesson: after trying for nearly five years to beat the tiny Apple, the collective intelligence of all those “smart” people at MSFT gave us what? Zune! And screwed the lot of its “partners” in the process. Yeah, that’s really interesting.

  33. @17,

    Nail on the head. The Zune was a failure before it was released. No one is interested in DRM’d music anymore, as Steve Jobs himself is even saying.

    Capitalism is the force behind DRM, plain and simple. That’s another un-interesting part of capitalism. Capitalism is about money, greed, me, me, me.

  34. @17,

    Nail on the head. The Zune was a failure before it was released. No one is interested in DRM’d music anymore, as Steve Jobs himself is even saying.

    Capitalism is the force behind DRM, plain and simple. That’s another un-interesting part of capitalism. Capitalism is about money, greed, me, me, me.

  35. “Could Gartenberg be Microsoft’s next Scoble?” asks Microsoft shill Joe Wilcox at:

    Well, Roberto actually left MSFT, so he gets a positive point (though obviously he’s had a terrible time since cleansing himself off the odor). What a sad way for Gartenberg to cash in his reputation.

  36. “Could Gartenberg be Microsoft’s next Scoble?” asks Microsoft shill Joe Wilcox at:

    Well, Roberto actually left MSFT, so he gets a positive point (though obviously he’s had a terrible time since cleansing himself off the odor). What a sad way for Gartenberg to cash in his reputation.

  37. @19,

    There is some truth to what you say. The only reason anyone would work for MS is for the money. Some are paid better than others, but since the products they put out are DRM-laden and have evil licenses, I could never work for them even if they offered me millions of dollars. I value my integrity far too much.

    The fact that MS spends billions of dollars a year on R&D (more than the GNP of even many large countries), and still suffers from the worst security track record in the world of software is no one I would want to work for, some so-called interesting projects or not.

  38. @19,

    There is some truth to what you say. The only reason anyone would work for MS is for the money. Some are paid better than others, but since the products they put out are DRM-laden and have evil licenses, I could never work for them even if they offered me millions of dollars. I value my integrity far too much.

    The fact that MS spends billions of dollars a year on R&D (more than the GNP of even many large countries), and still suffers from the worst security track record in the world of software is no one I would want to work for, some so-called interesting projects or not.

  39. RE: The silence from Ray lately is getting deafening

    Since the disruption “Memo” and release of one microformat – zilch! And I am (was) a MS fan. There is so much capacity and capability there. Right now, I have to bet against Ray.

  40. RE: The silence from Ray lately is getting deafening

    Since the disruption “Memo” and release of one microformat – zilch! And I am (was) a MS fan. There is so much capacity and capability there. Right now, I have to bet against Ray.

  41. “There is so much capacity and capability there.”

    I wish people would stop saying that about MSFT. It was said that XBox team had so much smarts and capability, they gave us Zune. Ditto Search team, various Live offerings, etc. Either MSFT collecively needs the biggest dosage of anti-constipation medicine ever known to man or, perhaps, this “they are so smart” nonsense has got to be replaced by a larger dose of scepticsm about their “capacity and capability”.

  42. “There is so much capacity and capability there.”

    I wish people would stop saying that about MSFT. It was said that XBox team had so much smarts and capability, they gave us Zune. Ditto Search team, various Live offerings, etc. Either MSFT collecively needs the biggest dosage of anti-constipation medicine ever known to man or, perhaps, this “they are so smart” nonsense has got to be replaced by a larger dose of scepticsm about their “capacity and capability”.

  43. I just moved from the UK to Redmond to join Microsoft. I didn’t do it for the money and I don’t regret the decision for a single second. I see cool & interesting things every day.

  44. I just moved from the UK to Redmond to join Microsoft. I didn’t do it for the money and I don’t regret the decision for a single second. I see cool & interesting things every day.

  45. Peter, you want to know what’s interesting about Microsoft? Think about it – if it wasn’t interesting, Apple wouldn’t really be talking about it so much. In fact the it’s using Vista to sell Macs. How about that?

    anona, check out the Microsoft Research website. They’re doing some cool stuff over there.

  46. Peter, you want to know what’s interesting about Microsoft? Think about it – if it wasn’t interesting, Apple wouldn’t really be talking about it so much. In fact the it’s using Vista to sell Macs. How about that?

    anona, check out the Microsoft Research website. They’re doing some cool stuff over there.

  47. “anona, check out the Microsoft Research website. They’re doing some cool stuff over there.”

    Who cares about lab items? MSFT spent billions over the last decade on R&D. Show me stuff already SHIPPING that’s interesting. Otherwise MSFT shareholder suckers might as well send another plane or a brand new kitchen to Nathan Myrvold.

    The demonstrated inability of MSFT to create *and* profitably sell interesting stuff in *competitive* markets should have become obvious to anyone concerned enough to check the record. MSFT must have one of the worst R&D pay-off records in the industry. If I hear BillG one more time talking about “cool stuff” in his labs like, say, speech, I’ll gag. Ship it already and let’s yet another time the emperor has no clothes.

  48. “anona, check out the Microsoft Research website. They’re doing some cool stuff over there.”

    Who cares about lab items? MSFT spent billions over the last decade on R&D. Show me stuff already SHIPPING that’s interesting. Otherwise MSFT shareholder suckers might as well send another plane or a brand new kitchen to Nathan Myrvold.

    The demonstrated inability of MSFT to create *and* profitably sell interesting stuff in *competitive* markets should have become obvious to anyone concerned enough to check the record. MSFT must have one of the worst R&D pay-off records in the industry. If I hear BillG one more time talking about “cool stuff” in his labs like, say, speech, I’ll gag. Ship it already and let’s yet another time the emperor has no clothes.

  49. @17 “Like Spock said, “the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.”

    After all this time, I had no idea Vulcan’s were Communists. The things you learn…

  50. @17 “Like Spock said, “the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.”

    After all this time, I had no idea Vulcan’s were Communists. The things you learn…

  51. @28,

    That comment by Spock is in no way “communist”. Socialist, yes, but not communist. Please do a little reading on the vast differences between the two.

  52. @28,

    That comment by Spock is in no way “communist”. Socialist, yes, but not communist. Please do a little reading on the vast differences between the two.

  53. @29, I understand the differences, believe me. I made the mistake of using a capital “C”. Technically, what “Spock” said is close to Marx’s definition of communism: “from each according to his/her ability, to each according to his/her need.” And his defintion of socialism was: “from each according to his/her ability, to each according to his/her work.”

    I also understand that there aren’t many known examples of capitialism failing. Can’t say the same for socialism or communism.

  54. @29, I understand the differences, believe me. I made the mistake of using a capital “C”. Technically, what “Spock” said is close to Marx’s definition of communism: “from each according to his/her ability, to each according to his/her need.” And his defintion of socialism was: “from each according to his/her ability, to each according to his/her work.”

    I also understand that there aren’t many known examples of capitialism failing. Can’t say the same for socialism or communism.